CFP – « Disability and the Medieval Cults of Saints: Interdisciplinary and Intersectional Approaches » – edited volume by Stephanie Grace-Petinos, Leah Pope Parker, and Alicia Spencer-Hall

CFP: Disability and the Medieval Cults of Saints: Interdisciplinary and Intersectional Approaches
Discussion published by Massimo Rondolino on Friday, July 27, 2018
Editors: Stephanie Grace-Petinos, Leah Pope Parker, and Alicia Spencer-Hall
We invite abstract submissions for 7,500-word essays to be included in an edited volume on the topic of Disability and the Medieval Cults of Saints. Because saints’ cults in the Middle Ages centralized the body—those of the saints themselves, those of devotees, and the idea of the body on earth and in the afterlife—scholars of medieval disability frequently find that our best sources are those that also deal with saints and sanctity. This volume therefore seeks to foster and assemble a wide range of approaches to disability in the context of medieval saints’ cults. We seek contributions spanning a variety of fields, including history, literature, art history, archaeology, material culture, histories of science and medicine, religious history, etc. We especially encourage contributions that extend beyond Roman Christianity (including non-Christian concepts of sanctity) and that extend beyond Europe/the West.
For the purposes of this volume, we define “disability” as broadly including physical impairment, diversity of bodily forms, chronic illness, neurodiversity (mental illness, cognitive impairment, etc), sensory impairment, and any other variation in bodily form or ability that affected medieval individuals’ role and treatment in their communities. We are open to topics spanning the medieval period both temporally and geographically, but also inclusive of late antiquity and the early modern era. The editors envision essays falling into three units: saints with disabilities; saints interacting with disability; and theorizing sanctity/disability.
We welcome proposals on topics including, but not limited to:
· Phenomenology of saints’ cults with respect to disability, e.g. pilgrimage, feast days, liturgy, etc;
· Materiality of sanctity involved in reliquaries, shrines, and relics;
· Doctrinal approaches to disability in relation to sanctity and holiness;
· Sanctity and bodies in the archaeological record;
· Intersections of disability and race/gender/sexuality/etc in hagiography, art, and material culture;
· Healing miracles and disabling miraculous punishments;
· Cross-cultural approaches to sanctity and disability;
· Saints who wrote about disability;
· Specific saints with connections to concepts of disability, e.g. Margaret of Antioch, Cosmas and Damian, Francis of Assisi, Dymphna, etc;
· Theorizing sanctity in relation to disability; and
· Saintly figures in non-hagiographic genres.
Timeline
Oct. 1, 2018 Proposals due
Oct. 31, 2018 Replies sent to proposals
Nov. 30, 2018 Volume proposal submitted to press (contributors will provide short abstracts and bios)
May 31, 2019 Essays due from contributors
Aug. 30, 2019 Editors deliver extensive feedback to contributors
Jan. 15, 2020 Revised essays due from contributors
April 3, 2020 Full volume manuscript delivered to press
Please submit abstracts of 300–400 words, along with a short author bio and a description of any images you anticipate wanting to include in your essay, to the editors at DisabilitySanctity@gmail.com by Monday, October 1, 2018.

Must see sessions on Disability History – International Medieval Congress – Leeds – 2018 2-5 July 2018

Must see ! sessions on Disability History –

International Medieval Congress –

Leeds – 2018 2-5 July 2018

Session 150
Title Scientific, Empirical, Biblical, and Hagiographical Knowledge in the Middle Ages, I: Astronomy, Computus, and Medicine
Date/Time Monday 2 July 2018: 11.15-12.45
Sponsor School of Arts, English & Languages, Queen’s University Belfast
Organiser Sarah Baccianti, School of Arts, English & Languages, Queen’s University Belfast
Moderator/Chair Ciaran Arthur, School of Arts, English & Languages, Queen’s University Belfast
Paper 150-a Anglo-Saxons’ Visions of Modern Science
(Language: English)
Marilina Cesario, School of Arts, English & Languages, Queen’s University Belfast
Pedro Lacerda, School of Mathematics & Physics, Queen’s University Belfast
Index Terms: Historiography – Medieval; Language and Literature – Old English; Science
Paper 150-b Why Write Computus in English?: Vernacularity and Computistical Inquiry
(Language: English)
Rebecca Stephenson, School of English, Drama & Film, University College Dublin
Index Terms: Language and Literature – Old English; Literacy and Orality; Science
Paper 150-c Pus, Boils, and Amputations: Surgery in Medieval Scandinavia
(Language: English)
Sarah Baccianti, School of Arts, English & Languages, Queen’s University Belfast
Index Terms: Language and Literature – Scandinavian; Medicine
Abstract This session will focus on attitudes to knowledge, which constitutes one of the most complex concepts in the Middle Ages, as suggested by the vast semantic range of the Latin terms commonly translated as ‘knowledge’, including scientia, cognitio, notitia, eruditio and sapientia.
It will consider how scientia was transmitted and manipulated in the Middle Ages by looking at diverse sources ranging from astronomical, computistical, and mechanical texts (medicine, agriculture, and navigation), maps and the environment, and liturgical and hagiographical compositions from England, Scandinavia, and the Continent. Furthermore it will discuss the ways in which scientific knowledge and biblical and hagiographical learning were used to exercise power and the role that beliefs played in shaping and promoting scientific thinking.
Session 339
Title Memory in the Angevin World
Date/Time Monday 2 July 2018: 16.30-18.00
Sponsor Angevin World Network
Organiser Michael Staunton, School of History, University College Dublin
Moderator/Chair Stephen Church, Department of History, King’s College London
Paper 339-a Remembering the Conquest of Ireland in the Angevin World
(Language: English)
Colin Veach, School of Histories, Languages & Cultures, University of Hull
Index Terms: Historiography – Medieval; Mentalities; Military History
Paper 339-b Remembering Illness in the Angevin World: Variations of Familial Memory in the Miracle Accounts of Gilbert of Sempringham
(Language: English)
Krystal Carmichael, School of History, University College Dublin
Index Terms: Hagiography; Historiography – Medieval; Medicine; Mentalities
Paper 339-c Remembering the Loss of Normandy
(Language: English)
Michael Staunton, School of History, University College Dublin
Index Terms: Historiography – Medieval; Mentalities; Military History
Abstract This session addresses the ways in which events were remembered in the lands ruled by the Angevin kings of England (c. 1154 – c. 1216), a time of much innovation and variety in the recording and remembering of the past. Paper (a) looks at how the invasion of Ireland was remembered outside Ireland, in Latin and vernacular texts. Paper (b) discusses disputed memories of miracles in hagiographical texts, particularly those associated with Gilbert of Sempringham. Paper (c) examines the divergent ways in which King John’s loss of Normandy was remembered across the ‘Angevin empire’.

 

Session 399
Title #disIMC: Current Challenges to Accessibility and Ways Forward – A Round Table Discussion
Date/Time Monday 2 July 2018: 16.30-18.00
Sponsor Medievalists with Disabilities Network
Organiser Alexandra R. A. Lee, Department of Italian, University College London
Moderator/Chair Alexandra R. A. Lee, Department of Italian, University College London
Abstract At the IMC 2017, Medievalists with Disabilities hosted its first event. #disIMC was a ‘bring your own lunch’ affair, slotted into the timetable at the last minute. It was a great success and marked the beginning of the Medievalists with Disabilities (#dismed) network.

This round table discussion will discuss accessibility in higher education and ways that we can address issues. We take the term disabilities in the broadest possible sense, incorporating invisible and visible conditions, chronic illness, and mental health, to name but a few. Panellists will address issues individuals have overcome in Higher Education, discuss what it is like to be in HE with a disability/chronic condition, and pinpoint issues that need further attention.

Participants include Joanne Edge (University of Cambridge), Edward Mills (University of Exeter), Emma Osborne (University of Glasgow), Alicia Spencer-Hall (University College London), and Therron Welstead (University of Wales Trinity Saint David).

 

Session 604
Title New Voices in Anglo-Saxon Studies, I
Date/Time Tuesday 3 July 2018: 11.15-12.45
Sponsor International Society of Anglo-Saxonists
Organiser Megan Cavell, Department of English Literature, University of Birmingham
Moderator/Chair Damian Fleming, Department of English & Linguistics, Indiana University-Purdue University, Fort Wayne
Paper 604-a ‘Se bið mihtigre se ðe gæð þonne se þe crypð’: Metaphoric Disability in the Old English Boethius
(Language: English)
Leah Pope Parker, English Department, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Index Terms: Language and Literature – Old English; Philosophy; Social History
Paper 604-b Women, Adornment, and Social Change: Necklaces in 7th-Century Anglo-Saxon England
(Language: English)
Katie Haworth, Department of Archaeology, Durham University
Index Terms: Archaeology – Artefacts; Women’s Studies
Paper 604-c Quid est vox?: Mystery and Mysticism
(Language: English)
Matthew Coker, St Hilda’s College, University of Oxford
Index Terms: Language and Literature – Celtic; Language and Literature – Latin; Language and Literature – Old English; Learning (The Classical Inheritance)
Abstract The New Voices sessions are intended for all scholars new to the field of Anglo-Saxon studies, including research students, newly-appointed lecturers, and anyone who has only recently begun to work in this area. They provide an interdisciplinary perspective and showcase new work in the field. All submissions are reviewed by the International Society of Anglo-Saxonists (ISAS), who determine the ultimate selection of papers through a process of blind peer review. This particular session focuses on bodies.

 

Session 1047
Title Reputation, Emotion, and Remembering Death and Illness
Date/Time Wednesday 4 July 2018: 09.00-10.30
Sponsor Prato Consortium for Medieval & Renaissance Studies, Monash University, Victoria
Organiser Peter Francis Howard, Centre for Medieval & Renaissance Studies, Monash University, Victoria
Moderator/Chair John Henderson, Department of History, Classics & Archaeology, Birkbeck, University of London / School of Philosophical , Historical & International Studies , Monash University
Paper 1047-a Recording a Place of Emotions and Violence: Mapping the Coronial Deaths of Medieval Oxfordshire
(Language: English)
Annie Blachly, Centre for Medieval & Renaissance Studies, Monash University, Victoria
Index Terms: Archives and Sources; Computing in Medieval Studies; Social History
Paper 1047-b The Insania and Piety of Herimann of Nevers: Remembering a Mentally Ill Carolingian Bishop
(Language: English)
Rachel Stone, Department of History, King’s College London / Learning Resources & Service Excellence, University of Bedfordshire
Index Terms: Ecclesiastical History; Medicine; Mentalities
Paper 1047-c Medical Memory of Sense and Emotion by Baverio de’Bonetti (d. 1480): A Physician of Bologna
(Language: English)
Gordon Whyte, School of Philosophical, Historical & International Studies, Monash University, Victoria
Index Terms: Medicine; Social History
Abstract Serious illness and sudden or violent death were familiar aspects of medieval life, but how did people choose to remember such experiences? Linked to the Body in the City Project, this session draws on a variety of different sources from across the Middle Ages recording illness and death, including medical treatises, coroners’ rolls, and forms of religious commemoration. The papers explore how the messy experiences of illness and death, and the complex emotions of those involved, could be interpreted and turned into more formal accounts of events, suitable for permanent record.

 

Session 1108
Title Sanctifying the Crip, Cripping the Sacred: Disability, Holiness, and Embodied Knowledge
Date/Time Wednesday 4 July 2018: 11.15-12.45
Sponsor Hagiography Society
Organiser Alicia Spencer-Hall, School of Languages, Linguistics & Film, Queen Mary, University of London
Moderator/Chair Alicia Spencer-Hall, School of Languages, Linguistics & Film, Queen Mary, University of London
Paper 1108-a Hildegard of Bingen’s Hagiography: The Community of Heaven and Earth and the Social Model of Disability
(Language: English)
Stephen Marc D’Evelyn, School for Policy Studies, University of Bristol
Index Terms: Gender Studies; Hagiography; Religious Life; Theology
Paper 1108-b Translations of (Dis)Ability, Disease, and Digestion in The Book of Margery Kempe
(Language: English)
Katherine Gubbels, English Department, Metropolitan Community College, Nebraska
Index Terms: Gender Studies; Hagiography; Medicine; Theology
Paper 1108-c Disability and Power in the Early Lives of St Francis of Assisi
(Language: English)
Donna Trembinski, Department of History, St Francis Xavier University, Nova Scotia
Index Terms: Gender Studies; Hagiography; Religious Life; Theology
Paper 1108-d Bodily Arithmetic: Physical and Sacred Identity in Tristan de Nanteuil
(Language: English)
Blake Gutt, Department of French, University of Cambridge
Index Terms: Gender Studies; Hagiography; Religious Life; Theology
Abstract A vast amount of our knowledge of the experience of impairment in the Middle Ages comes from religious works. An important manifestation of a presumptive saint’s holiness was their capacity to perform mystically curative healings to return their devotees to an able-bodied state. But medieval saints did not just tend to those with impairment. Some saints were themselves explicitly physically impaired, either permanently or temporarily. Saints’ ascetic self-mortification could also lead to impairment. In all instances, the saint’s body is divergent to the able-bodied norm of those around them, the non-saintly. It operates as a vector of the divine in miraculous healing of others; a receptacle of the divine in their ability to withstand extreme ascetic degradation. What is at stake if we consider the medieval saint’s body as impaired, disabled, emphatically non-able-bodied?

Ultimately, this panel seeks to interrogate the ways in which the body – be that the saintly body, the disabled body, and/or the saintly and disabled body – acts as a site of embodied knowledge. More specifically, it aims to consider the body as a site of somatic memorialization: the corporeal matter of memory formation, memory retention, and temporal disturbance. How do impairments – writ on holy and profane bodies alike – bear witness to events, subject positions, even evanescent truths? And what does this form of productive bodily witnessing bring to bear on the concept of disability itself? This panel is comprised of four 15-minute papers.

More infos on the IMC Leeds website !

Permeable bodies 05 – 06 October 2018 – University college london

Permeable bodies – 05/06 October 2018 – University college london

In recent years, the human body has gained a prominent position in discussions of medieval and early modern cultures. The troublesome contingency of the human body encompassed critical boundaries between inside and outside, and became a central concern in religious, political, and economical developments. Medieval bodies were permeable microcosms, not only sites containment but also of revelatory experiences. In the early modern period, body and identity were indistinct, interdependent categories, inseparable from the natural and cultural space that they inhabited. This logic of perpetual fluidity both generated a disquieting sense of impending doom, but also allowed for the propagation of multiple possibilities of understanding, which materialised into a rich visual and material culture.

We are delighted to invite all those interested in medieval and early modern studies to a 2-day conference on Friday 5 and Saturday 6 October 2018 at University College London. This event will explore medieval and early modern notions of the changing body, as well as changing notions of the body. Images and ideas of permeable bodies will serve as an inclusive platform of inquiry into bodies of different race, gender, sex, and ability.

We welcome 20 minutes talks from scholars of any career stage. We are particularly interested in incisive and provoking perspectives on bodies traditionally relegated to the margins, in conjunction with gender and disability studies. We seek critical and original responses on the theme of corporeal permeability across not only disciplines, but also chronological and geographical boundaries.

The conference includes a workshop at the Wellcome Library, where selected images from the archives will be displayed in a private study room.

Keynote speaker: Dr. Jack Hartnell (University of East Anglia)

Please send a short abstract (200-300 words) and a biography (100 words) by Monday 23 July to Laura Scalabrella Spada and Lauren Rozenberg at permeablebodies@gmail.com. We will notify applicants by Monday 6 August.

Bursaries available on application. Please visit permeablebodies.wordpress.com for more details on how to apply, updates, and additional information.

 

More infos on the organistor’s website

CFP – Skin in Medieval and Early Modern Worlds – Perth Medieval and Renaissance Group/UWA Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies Annual Conference

Skin in Medieval and Early Modern Worlds

Perth Medieval and Renaissance Group/UWA Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies Annual Conference

13 October 2018

From the organisators website :

Keynote Speaker: Dr Lisa Beaven (La Trobe University), ‘Living Flesh: Splendor, Sex and Sickness on the Surface of the Skin’.

Skin as a material served a vital role in premodern economies. It was an essential ingredient in clothing and tools, and it formed the primary material for the manuscripts on which knowledge and ideas were recorded and preserved. Beyond the many uses for the skins of animals, the idea of skin interested artists, scholars, and theologians. As a boundary or surface, skin presented a range of symbolic possibilities. Images of skin, such as its piercing, often acted as metaphors for the uncovering of secrets or the interpretation of allegory. Premodern observers, likewise, often believed that the appearance and colour of an individual’s skin indicated truths about their inner nature. Diseases of the skin, such as leprosy, attracted legislation and intellectual speculation, drawing together the immaterial world of ideas regarding skin and the treatment of actual human skins.

We are interested in papers that address the many premodern uses of skin, as well representations of and ideas about skin. This conference is multidisciplinary and wide-ranging; we welcome papers from the fields of book culture and manuscript studies, history, material culture, medicine, disability studies, race studies, crime and punishment, art, literature, and theology.

The conference organisers invite proposals for 20-minute papers.

Please send a paper title, 250-word abstract, and a short (no more than 100-word) biography to pmrg.cmems.conference@gmail.com by 31 May 2018.

 

 

More infos on the organisators website.

New book – Trauma in Medieval Society – by Wendy J. Turner and Christina Lee

Trauma in Medieval Society

Series: Explorations in Medieval Culture, Volume: 7

 

 

Submary from the editor website:

Trauma in Medieval Society is an edited collection of articles from a variety of scholars on the history of trauma and the traumatised in medieval Europe. Looking at trauma as a theoretical concept, as part of the literary and historical lives of medieval individuals and communities, this volume brings together scholars from the fields of archaeology, anthropology, history, literature, religion, and languages. The collection offers insights into the physical impairments from and psychological responses to injury, shock, war, or other violence—either corporeal or mental. From biographical to socio-cultural analyses, these articles examine skeletal and archival evidence as well as literary substantiation of trauma as lived experience in the Middle Ages.

Contributors are Carla L. Burrell, Sara M. Canavan, Susan L. Einbinder, Michael M. Emery, Bianca Frohne, Ronald J. Ganze, Helen Hickey, Sonja Kerth, Jenni Kuuliala, Christina Lee, Kate McGrath, Charles-Louis Morand Métivier, James C. Ohman, Walton O. Schalick, III, Sally Shockro, Patricia Skinner, Donna Trembinski, Wendy J. Turner, Belle S. Tuten, Anne Van Arsdall, and Marit van Cant.

More info on the editor website.