Archives par mot-clé : Otherness

CFP – Skin in Medieval and Early Modern Worlds – Perth Medieval and Renaissance Group/UWA Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies Annual Conference

Skin in Medieval and Early Modern Worlds

Perth Medieval and Renaissance Group/UWA Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies Annual Conference

13 October 2018

From the organisators website :

Keynote Speaker: Dr Lisa Beaven (La Trobe University), ‘Living Flesh: Splendor, Sex and Sickness on the Surface of the Skin’.

Skin as a material served a vital role in premodern economies. It was an essential ingredient in clothing and tools, and it formed the primary material for the manuscripts on which knowledge and ideas were recorded and preserved. Beyond the many uses for the skins of animals, the idea of skin interested artists, scholars, and theologians. As a boundary or surface, skin presented a range of symbolic possibilities. Images of skin, such as its piercing, often acted as metaphors for the uncovering of secrets or the interpretation of allegory. Premodern observers, likewise, often believed that the appearance and colour of an individual’s skin indicated truths about their inner nature. Diseases of the skin, such as leprosy, attracted legislation and intellectual speculation, drawing together the immaterial world of ideas regarding skin and the treatment of actual human skins.

We are interested in papers that address the many premodern uses of skin, as well representations of and ideas about skin. This conference is multidisciplinary and wide-ranging; we welcome papers from the fields of book culture and manuscript studies, history, material culture, medicine, disability studies, race studies, crime and punishment, art, literature, and theology.

The conference organisers invite proposals for 20-minute papers.

Please send a paper title, 250-word abstract, and a short (no more than 100-word) biography to pmrg.cmems.conference@gmail.com by 31 May 2018.

 

 

More infos on the organisators website.

New book – Trauma in Medieval Society – by Wendy J. Turner and Christina Lee

Trauma in Medieval Society

Series: Explorations in Medieval Culture, Volume: 7

 

 

Submary from the editor website:

Trauma in Medieval Society is an edited collection of articles from a variety of scholars on the history of trauma and the traumatised in medieval Europe. Looking at trauma as a theoretical concept, as part of the literary and historical lives of medieval individuals and communities, this volume brings together scholars from the fields of archaeology, anthropology, history, literature, religion, and languages. The collection offers insights into the physical impairments from and psychological responses to injury, shock, war, or other violence—either corporeal or mental. From biographical to socio-cultural analyses, these articles examine skeletal and archival evidence as well as literary substantiation of trauma as lived experience in the Middle Ages.

Contributors are Carla L. Burrell, Sara M. Canavan, Susan L. Einbinder, Michael M. Emery, Bianca Frohne, Ronald J. Ganze, Helen Hickey, Sonja Kerth, Jenni Kuuliala, Christina Lee, Kate McGrath, Charles-Louis Morand Métivier, James C. Ohman, Walton O. Schalick, III, Sally Shockro, Patricia Skinner, Donna Trembinski, Wendy J. Turner, Belle S. Tuten, Anne Van Arsdall, and Marit van Cant.

More info on the editor website.

Corps hybrides aux frontières de l’humain au Moyen Âge – Université catholique de Louvain, 19-20 avril 2018

Corps hybrides aux frontières de l’humain au Moyen Âge

Colloque international (Université catholique de Louvain, 19-20 avril 2018)

 

 

Programme

Jeudi 19 avril 2018

14h

Accueil des participants

14h30
Séance I / Imaginer la frontière de l’humain : entre texte et enluminure

Christine Ferlampin-Acher
(U. de Rennes II)
Le monstre Malegrape dans Artus de Bretagne (§§ 108 ss.) entre textes et images

Damien Kempf (U. of Liverpool)
Monstrous Tales, Monstrous Beasts : Saracens as Hybrids

András Borgó (U. Innsbruck)
Hybrid Bodies in Hebrew Manuscript Illuminations

16h

Pause café

16h30
Séance II / Narrations monstrueuses : fantaisie du soi et de l’autre

Miranda Griffin (U. of Cambridge)
Mélusine and Margaret : Assemblages and Monstrous Maternity

Jessy Simonini (ENS, Paris)
Cors, bras et chiere aveit semblant as noz: images du centaure dans le Roman de Troie

Antonella Sciancalepore
(UCLouvain)
Chevaliers-poisson et enfants-arbalète: recherches sur les hybridations humain-inorganique

Vendredi 20 avril 2018

9h15

Accueil

9h30

Séance III / Encadrer le monstre : la science face à l’hybride

Pierre-Olivier Dittmar (EHESS, Paris)
Le Monstres des hommes

Catherine Megan Crossley (U. of Liverpool)
Human or Hybrid? Medieval Monstrous Men and the Question of the Soul

10h30

Pause café

11h

Séance IV / Lost in time : les transformations de l’hybride

Jacqueline Leclercq-Marx (ULB, Bruxelles)
Une frontière très mouvante. L’humanisation du monstrueux dans le haut Moyen Âge et le Moyen Âge central

Grégory Clesse – Florence Ninitte (UCLouvain – U. zu Köln)
Pérégrinations des peuples hybrides dans les histoires et géographies de l’Orient

Clémence Gauche (U. de Nantes)
Identité aux frontières de l’humain : monstres et hybrides dans les sceaux de la fin du Moyen-Âge (XIIe-XVIe siècles)

 

13h45

Séance V / Table ronde conclusive

Modérée par Cristina Noacco (U. de Toulouse II) et Antonella Sciancalepore

 

More infos on the UCLouvain website.

Mental Illness in Ancient Medicine. From Celsus to Paul of Aegina – by Chiara Thumiger and P. N. Singer

Mental Illness in Ancient Medicine. From Celsus to Paul of Aegina

By Chiara Thumiger and P. N. Singer

publication Brill 2018

 

Summary from the publisher :

In Mental Illness in Ancient Medicine: From Celsus to Paul of Aegina a detailed account is given, by a range of experts in the field, of the development of different conceptualizations of the mind and its pathology by medical authors from the beginning of the imperial period to the seventh century CE. New analysis is offered, both of the dominant texts of Galen and of such important but neglected figures as Rufus, Archigenes, Athenaeus of Attalia, Aretaeus, Caelius Aurelianus and the Byzantine ‘compilers’. The work of these authors is considered both in its medical-historical context and in relation to philosophical and theological debates – on ethics and on the nature of the soul – with which they interacted.

 

More on the publisher website.

Portraits of Human Monsters in the Renaissance – Dwarves, Hirsutes, and Castrati as Idealized Anatomical Anomalies by Touba Ghadessi

Portraits of Human Monsters in the Renaissance – Dwarves, Hirsutes, and Castrati as Idealized Anatomical Anomalies

by Touba Ghadessi

publication by Medieval Institute Publications

From the editors website :

« At the center of this interdisciplinary study are court monsters–dwarves, hirsutes, and misshapen individuals–who, by their very presence, altered Renaissance ethics vis-à-vis anatomical difference, social virtues, and scientific knowledge. The study traces how these monsters evolved from objects of curiosity, to scientific cases, to legally independent beings. The works examined here point to the intricate cultural, religious, ethical, and scientific perceptions of monstrous individuals who were fixtures in contemporary courts. »

 

More infos from the Editors website.

 

New book – Prosthesis in Medieval and Early Modern Culture – Edited by Chloe Porter, Katie L. Walter, Margaret Healy

Prosthesis in Medieval and Early Modern Culture

Edited by Chloe Porter, Katie L. Walter, Margaret Healy

2018 Routledge

Description by the editor :

« ‘Prosthesis’ denotes a rhetorical ‘addition’ to a pre-existing ‘beginning’, a ‘replacement’ for that which is ‘defective or absent’, a technological mode of ‘correction’ that reveals a history of corporeal and psychic discontent. Recent scholarship has given weight to these multiple meanings of ‘prosthesis’ as tools of analysis for literary and cultural criticism. The study of pre-modern prosthesis, however, often registers as an absence in contemporary critical discourse.

This collection seeks to redress this omission, reconsidering the history of prosthesis and its implications for contemporary critical responses to, and uses of, it. The book demonstrates the significance of notions of prosthesis in medieval and early modern theological debate, Reformation controversy, and medical discourse and practice. It also tracks its importance for imaginings of community and of the relationship of self and other, as performed on the stage, expressed in poetry, charms, exemplary and devotional literature, and as fought over in the documents of religious and cultural change. Interdisciplinary in nature, the book engages with contemporary critical and cultural theory and philosophy, genre theory, literary history, disability studies, and medical humanities, establishing prosthesis as a richly productive analytical tool in the pre-modern, as well as the modern, context. This book was originally published as a special issue of the Textual Practice journal. »

More infos on the editor website !

Meetings – Seminar – Birkbeck Medieval Seminar: The Productive Medieval Body, Fri 1 June 2018, Keynes Library, School of Arts, Birkbeck, 43 Gordon Square, London.

Birkbeck Medieval Seminar: The Productive Medieval Body

Fri 1 June 2018,

Keynes Library, School of Arts, Birkbeck, 43 Gordon Square, London.

 

The Birkbeck Medieval Seminar is an annual event. It is free and open to all scholars of the Middle Ages. It is designed to foster conversation and debate on a particular topic within medieval studies by providing the opportunity to hear new research from experts in the field. We are a welcoming and inclusive environment. This venue is fully accessible. Please contact Isabel Davis (i.davis@bbk.ac.uk) for further information or if you need help using the registration site.

Speakers:

Kim Phillips (Auckland);

Maaike van der Lugt (Paris – Diderot);

Vincent Gillespie (Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford)

and Alicia Spencer-Hall (UCL).

Titles to be confirmed.

Coffee and tea is provided but you will need to find or bring your own lunch.

Please note: this is a free event and, as such, if you book a ticket and later find out that you cannot attend, please do cancel your booking so that your place can be made available to someone else.

 

More infos on the Evenbrite of the event

Meeting – International Workshop “Gender(ed) Histories of Health, Healing and the Body, 1250-1550” – 25/26 jan. 2018 at a.r.t.e.s. Cologne

International Workshop “Gender(ed) Histories of Health, Healing and the Body, 1250-1550”

Thursday, January 25 to Friday, January 26 2018 / a.r.t.e.s. Graduate School for the Humanities Cologne, Aachener Str. 217, 50931 Cologne

 

Participation is free, to register please send an email to Eva Cersovky (cersovse@uni-koeln.de) by Friday, January 19, 2018.

This international workshop aims at systematically exploring the manifold relations between gender, health and healing during the 13th to 16th centuries, situating them at the nexus of medical, social, cultural, religious and economic concerns. Speakers focus on areas of the field which still require additional and more comprehensive attention with regard to gender, e.g. the household as a site of giving and receiving care but also of producing medicine, the healing and caring practices of religious women, the role of miscellanies or print in disseminating medical and bodily knowledge as well as perceptions of disability, infertility and age, to only name a few. Considering how distinct forms of healing were gendered in different texts and contexts and by different groups of people, speakers employ a wide variety of sources from a number of European countries as well as the Arabic world, ranging from medical treatise and recipes to hagiography and archival documents of practice as well as literary, visual and material sources. The workshop brings together historians from five countries, different disciplines and at all career stages, providing a forum for international discussion and reflection upon methodological and theoretical frameworks of the field.

 

Programm

Thursday, 25 January 2018

10:00-10:30: Eva-Maria Cersovsky and Ursula Gießmann (both Univ. of Cologne): Welcome and Introduction

10:30-11:30 KEYNOTE: Sharon Strocchia (Emory Univ.): The Politics of Household Medicine at the Early Medici Court

11:30-11:45: Coffee Break

SESSION I: SOURCES OF RELIGIOUS HEALING
Chair: Sabine von Heusinger (Univ. of Cologne)

11:45-12:30: Sara M. Ritchey (Univ. of Tennessee): Foliated Healing: Miscellanies as Sources for Gendered Medical Practice in the Late Medieval Low Countries

12:30-13:15: Krisztina Ilko (Univ. of Cambridge): Friars, Women, and Saints. Investigating Healing Miracles of the Early Augustinian Beati

13:15-14:45: Lunch

14:45-15:30: Iliana Kandzha (Central European Univ. Budapest): Female Saints as Agents of Female Healing?: Issues of Gendered Practices and Patronage in the Cult of St Cunigunde (1200-1350)

SESSION II: PRODUCING, TRANSMITTING AND APPLYING KNOWLEDGE
Chair: Bernhard Hollick (Univ. of Cologne / GHI London)

15:30-16:15: Linda Ehrsam Voigts (Univ. of Missouri): Women and Medical Distillation at a Great Household in Late-Medieval England

16:15-16:45: Coffee Break

16:45-17:30: Belle S. Tuten (Juniata College): Care of the Breast in Late Medieval Medicine

17:30-18:15: Julia Gruman Martins (Univ. of London): Understanding/Controlling the Female Body in Ten Recipes: Print and the Dissemination of Medical Knowledge about Women in the Early 16th Century

Friday, 26 January 2018

SESSION III: INFIRMITY AND CARE
Chair: Letha Böhringer (Univ. of Cologne)

09:00-09:45: Donna Trembinski (St. Francis Xavier Univ.): At the Intersection of Sex and Gender: Infirm Masculinities and Femininities in the Thirteenth Century

09:45-10:30: Cordula Nolte (Univ. of Bremen): Domestic Care in the 15th and 16th Centuries: Expectations, Experiences, and Practices from a Gendered Perspective

10:30-11:00: Coffee Break

11:00-11:45: Eva-Maria Cersovsky (Univ. of Cologne): Ubi non est mulier, gemescit egens: Gendered Discourses of Care during the Later Middle Ages

SESSION IV: (IN)FERTILITY AND REPRODUCTION
Chair: Ursula Gießmann (Univ. of Cologne)

11:45-12:30: Catherine Rider (Univ. of Exeter): Gender, Old Age, and the Infertile Body in Medieval Medicine

12:30-13:30: Lunch

13:30-14:15: Lauren Wood (Univ. of California): Si Non Caste Tamen Caute: Contraception and Abortion in the Middle Ages

14:15-15:00: Ayman Yasin Atat (TU Braunschweig): Dealing with Menstrual Disorders in Arabic/Ottoman Medicine

15:00-15:30: Concluding discussion

CFP – Brussels Medieval Culture and War Conference: Power, Authority, and Normativity – Université Saint-Louis of Bruxelles, 24–26 May 2018

Brussels Medieval Culture and War Conference: Power, Authority, and Normativity

Université Saint-Louis – Bruxelles
24–26 May 2018

An omnipresent phenomenon, war was a dominant social fact that impacted every aspect of society in the Middle Ages. Moving away from so-called ‘histoire-bataille’ that studied war on its own as an isolated succession of battles, studies have moved towards investigation of the reciprocal relationships between military conflicts and the economic, legal, political, religious, and social spheres in the Middle Ages.

Capture d_écran 2017-12-16 à 18.05.18

After previous meetings held at the University of Leeds in 2016 and the University of Lisbon in 2017, the 2018 edition of the ‘Medieval Culture and War Conference’ will take place at the Saint-Louis University, Brussels, and will focus on the theme of ‘Power, Authority, and Normativity’. We particularly welcome papers that discuss how medieval warfare, through the organisation, the techniques, and the discourses it mobilised, contributed to the shaping of power and power relationships, and how these power relations, in turn, could influence the adoption of certain forms of military organisation and techniques of warfare; how it related to the concept of authority; and how it was regulated by changing sets of rules over the period. How did power relationships, ideas about authority, and evolving norms have an impact on medieval warfare in theory and in practice? Interdisciplinary approaches from various theoretical backgrounds (e.g. archaeologi- cal, art historical, historical, literary, or sociological perspectives) are encouraged.

Subjects may include, but are not limited to:

  • Theory, doctrine, and ideology of war
  • War, propaganda, and rulership
  • Law and legislation on warfare
  • Literature on war and chivalry
  • Chivalric ethos and military discipline
  • Military justice and violence
  • Military organisation and logistics
  • Warfare and religion
  • Gender and war
  • Fortifications, weaponry, and technology
  • Real and imagined relations between combatants and non-combatants
  • Ideas of ‘Others’ and ‘Otherness’ in warfare
  • Funding of warfare

The conference, organised by the Research Centre for the include keynote presentations by Justine Firnhaber-Baker (University of St Andrews) and Bertrand Schnerb (Université Lille 3). The working language for the conference is English. Please submit an abstract of 250–300 words for a twenty-minute paper, or a proposal for a thematic session of three twenty-minute papers, with a short biography of 150 words, to brusselscultureandwar@gmail.com by 31 January 2018. Contributions from postgraduates and early career researchers are encouraged. A publication of selected proceedings is planned.

 

Brussels Organisation Commi ee: Eric Bousmar (Université Saint-Louis – Bruxelles), Michael Depreter (Université libre de Bruxelles/Université Saint-Louis – Bruxelles), Philippe Desmette (Université Saint-Louis – Bruxelles), Gilles Lecuppre (Université catholique de Louvain), and Quentin Verreycken (Université catholique de Louvain/Université Saint-Louis – Bruxelles).

In conjunction with the Leeds Executive Organisation Committee and the Lisbon Organisation Committee.

For more information visit their website: cultureandwarconference.wordpress.com/.

CFP – Corps hybrides aux frontières de l’humain au Moyen Âge – Université Catholique de Louvain, 19-20 avril 2018

Appel à contribution – Corps hybrides aux frontières de l’humain au Moyen Âge

Colloque international, Université Catholique de Louvain, 19-20 avril 2018
Deadline : 31 décembre 2017

Dans la pensée médiévale, le corps humain fonctionne comme un miroir de l’univers et un modèle pour comprendre la nature, pour interpréter la Bible, pour renforcer les structures sociales et politiques. La déformation et la métamorphose du corps mettent en question cette fonction, surtout quand le corps franchit les frontières entre les différentes espèces et se contamine avec le non-humain, qu’il soit animal, végétal ou objet inanimé.

A l’époque médiévale, la littérature, l’art et la science enjambaient la distance qui sépare l’humain et le non-humain au moyen de créatures hybrides, dont l’identité était marquée par l’ambivalence. Les monstres anthropomorphes, les peuples exotiques censés avoir des traits animaux ou végétaux, les figures humaines intégrant des armes ou d’autres objets dans leurs corps, les animaux ou les plantes portant des ressemblances inquiétantes avec les humains : autant de créations qui dessinaient une constellation de possibilités dans un continuum des êtres.

Si la recherche sur la tératologie s’est parfois occupée de ces combinaisons d’humain et non-humain, les investigations se sont surtout concentrées sur les monstres en tant que représentation de l’altérité. Le temps est venu pour changer de perspective et pour considérer ces corps hybrides comme les produits d’une réflexion sur la possibilité (ou l’impossibilité) de penser l’être humain comme un être fluide et ouvert au non-humain.

Les communications, de la durée d’environ 20 minutes, porteront sur des cas d’interférence du corps humain avec l’animal, le végétal et l’inanimé, et viseront à répondre à des questions telles que : Quelle est la fonction du corps hybride dans la relation à l’humain ? Qu’est-ce qu’il enseigne au lecteur ? Comment l’hybride s’inscrit-t-il dans la représentation de l’identité sociale, politique ou ethnique ?

Modalité de soumission

Nous invitons chaleureusement celles et ceux qui seraient intéressés à nous envoyer une proposition. Cet appel est ouvert aux chercheurs et chercheuses à tous les niveaux de leur carrière, dans les domaines de la littérature, de l’art, de l’histoire culturelle et de l’histoire des sciences du Moyen Âge. Les propositions consisteront en un titre et un résumé de communication d’environ 250 mots, et devront être envoyées à l’adresse antonella.sciancalepore@uclouvain.be avant le 31 décembre 2017.

Comité organisateur

Baudouin Van den Abeele (Université Catholique de Louvain)
Antonella Sciancalepore (Université Catholique de Louvain)
Mattia Cavagna (Université Catholique de Louvain)
Craig Baker (Université Libre de Bruxelles)

History of Disease, Disability & Medicine in Medieval Europe