CFP – ICMS Kalamazoo 2019 – « Marked Bodies, Divine Remnants »

Marked Bodies, Divine Remnants
54th International Congress on Medieval Studies – Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo—May 9-12, 2019
Sponsored by the Hagiography Society – Organized by Stephanie Grace-Petinos

“[M]iracle is a prerequisite for sainthood, and more often than not miracle involves the marking of flesh” state Molly H. Bassett and Vincent W. Lloyd state in the introduction to their 2015 work Sainthood and Race: Marked Flesh, Holy Flesh (5). In many vitae, the saint’s marked flesh serves as proof of God’s privilege. The divine remnants imprinted upon a saint’s body could take many forms, such as missing limbs, scars, stigmata, suffering and pain, and being healed of— or gaining the ability to heal— impairment. After death, saints continued their embodied demarcation as relics, material remnants capable of channeling the divine that were further distinguished through division, enshrinement, veneration, and circulation throughout various geographical locales. This panel explores the ways in which hagiography represents how the divine is expressed upon saints’ bodies.
Possible questions include, but are not limited to:

  • What is the relationship between sainthood and physicality?
  • How does a saint’s divinely marked body juxtapose the sacred and the secular?
  • What is the role of disability, gender, and/or race?
  • What role does performance, spectacle, and/or audience play?
  • What limits, transgressions, or paradoxes does a marked body illuminate?

Please send abstracts of 250-300 words, along with a completed Participant Information form, to session organizer Stephanie Grace-Petinos (stephanie.grace.petinos@gmail.com) by Sept 15, 2018. Please include your name, title, and affiliation on the abstract itself. All abstracts not accepted for the session will be forwarded to Congress administrators for consideration in general sessions, as per Congress regulations.

Colloquium – Asclepius, the Paintbrush, and the Pen: Representations of Disease in Medieval and Early Modern European Art and Literature – May 4/5 – CMRS Medical Humanities Conference (UCLA)

CMRS Medical Humanities Conference

Asclepius, the Paintbrush, and the Pen: Representations of Disease in Medieval and Early Modern European Art and Literature

May 4May 5

Humanity has always approached disease with a mixture of curiosity and dread. Medieval and early modern people were no exception, displaying a deep fascination with virulent ailments and all sorts of physical deformities. But despite this a attraction, few artists of these eras engaged in the depiction of disease. When they did, their expression was particular to the medium used and differed among artists even when using the same medium. Since such an effort was outside their norm, what factors drove them to pick up pen or brush to approach maladies as a subject of esthetic expression? How did the artists’ experiences influence their choices in portraying disease? Were these depictions the result of something that interfered with their intent to faithfully reproduce the best of nature, or do they reflect a rebellion against what we generally assume to be the period`s artistic and literary quest: the portrayal of spiritual beauty and, later, the rediscovered beauty of the human body?

This conference, organized by Professor Massimo Ciavolella (Italian, UCLA) and Professor Rinaldo Canalis, MD (David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA), engages these questions and the contemporary perspective they elicit.

Funding for this symposium is provided by the Endowment for the UCLA Center for Medieval & Renaissance Studies.

 

SATURDAY, MAY 5, 2018 | UCLA ROYCE HALL 314
8:30 AM Registration, coffee
9:00 Welcoming Remarks
Session I | Allison Collins (UCLA), chair
9:15 Francis Wells (Royal Papworth Hospital, Cambridge)
“The Role of the Decorative Arts in Disease”
10:00 Break
10:15 Joachim Küpper (Freie Universität Berlin)
“Malady in Literary Texts from the Medieval and the Early Modern Periods – Some Hypotheses On a Paradoxical Constellation”
11:00 Break
11:15 Gaia Gubbini (Freie Universität Berlin)
“Leprosy, Melancholy, Folly, and their Representations in Medieval French Literature”
12:00 PM Break
12:15 Alain Touwaide (UCLA, The Huntington, and Institute for the Preservation of Medical Traditions )
“The Art of Medicine in Byzantium: Disease and Disability in Byzantine Manuscripts”
1:00 Lunch Break
Session II | Rinaldo Canalis (UCLA), chair
2:15 Domenico Bertoloni Meli (Indiana University Bloomington)
“Textures of Lesions – Textures of Prints”
3:00 Break
3:15 Manuela Gallerani (Università di Bologna)
“Illness in art and art in illness: reflections based on paradigmatic works by Italian Renaissance artists”
4:00 Break
4:15 Sara Frances Burdorff (UCLA)
“‘Yet have I in me something dangerous’: Demonopathy, the Pox, and the Melancholy Dane in Shakespeare’s Hamlet
SATURDAY, MAY 5, 2018 | UCLA ROYCE HALL 314
9:00 Coffee
Session III | Monique Kornell (CMRS Associate), chair
9:30 Valeria Finucci (Duke University)
“The King and the Art of Brain Surgery”
10:15 Break
10:30 Alfonso Paolella (University of Naples)
“The ‘mal franzoso’ between art, history and literature. Paracelso and Della Porta”
11:15 Break
11:30 Efraín Kristal (UCLA)
“Nicolas Poussin’s ‘The Plague at Ashdod’ and the French Disease”
12:15 Lunch Break
Session IV | Guendalina Ajello Mahler (CMRS Associate )
1:30 Jenni Kuuliala (University of Tampere)
“Miracle and the Monstrous: Disability and Deviant Bodies in the Late Middle Ages”
2:15 Break
2:30 Lori Jones (University of Ottawa)
“‘Fevers, Botches, and Carbuncles’: Describing the Plague in Late Medieval and Early Modern Medical Treatises”
3:15 Break
3:30 Roberto Fedi (Università per Stranieri di Perugia)
“The Ailing Artist”
4:15 Concluding Remarks

 

CFP – CALL FOR PAPERS The Maladies, Miracles and Medicine of the Middle Ages, II. Places, Spaces and Objects – The Graduate Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Reading – Friday 23. March 2018

The Maladies, Miracles and Medicine of the Middle Ages, II. Places, Spaces and Objects

The Graduate Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Reading Friday 23. March 2018.

As medievalists, we access our period through the written records, sites, and items that survive in order to form a deeper understanding of the period, one that goes beyond the page or the ruinous buildings that remain today. Using a wide range of sources is particularly valuable when considering the miraculous and the medicinal. After all, it is not just the writings, but the spaces, places and objects of both healthcare and of the holy which can inform and shape our research, and than of understanding. Indeed, in many instances these two elements combine, as can be seen through the production of miracle cures, the monastic collections of medical treatises, and medieval hospitals and monastic infirmaries.
But, what can these sources tell us of miracles, of medicine, of maladies? How did the miraculous and the medicinal relate to and/or oppose each other? What can we learn of faith and the faithful, and of ill-health and healing? It is questions such as these which the second ‘Maladies, Miracles and Medicine’ conference considers by bringing together post-graduate and early-career researchers who work on all aspects of the healing and the holy. The conference welcomes papers on all aspects of this theme whether your interests lie in archaeology, art, literature, medicine and science, or miracles and theology (or a little bit of everything). Particular themes to consider are:

  • Pilgrims as ‘patients’ and miraculous medicine
  • Hospitals, hospices and infirmaries as places of cure and places of piety
  •  Objects of healing and/or objects of faith
  • Landscapes and locations of religion and remedy
  • The written word as place, space, or object of cure or of faith
  • Personal devotion and home-based healthcare

Proposals for twenty-minute papers fitting broadly into one of the above themes are welcomed from all post-graduate and early-career researchers before the deadline, 5. January 2018. Proposals of no more than 200 words, and further enquiries are to be sent to the organisers, Dr Ruth Salter and Frances Cook, via: gcms.reading@gmail.com. Please be aware that further details will be released closer to the date.

CFP – Leeds 2017 – Pilgrimage: restoring physical, mental and spiritual health

Call for Papers: IMC Leeds 2017

Pilgrimage: Restoring Physical, Mental, and Spiritual Health

Sponsored by the Graduate Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Reading.
The thematic strand for the next International Medieval Congress (3-6 July 2017) at University of Leeds is Otherness. We invite you to submit proposals for 20-minute papers to take part in one or more sessions on the theme of pilgrimage as a restorative process between physical, mental, and spiritual sickness and health. We are particularly interested in papers that address identifications of pilgrims as « others » who were undertaking a unique physical and spiritual journey. Relevant topics include but are not limited to:
• Miraculous healing.

• Penitential pilgrimage.

• Proxy pilgrimage.

• Pilgrimage journeys.

• Experiences of pilgrims at shrines.

• Relics and saintly intercession.

• Monastic and lay interactions with the cult of saints.

If you would like to take part in these sessions, please send an abstract of no more than 200 words as well as a short bio to claire.trenery.2008@live.rhul.ac.uk by Friday 16 September 2016.

Organisers Ruth Salter (University of Reading, ) & Claire Treneryand (Royal Holloway, University of London, )