Archives par mot-clé : Medicine

CFP – Skin in Medieval and Early Modern Worlds – Perth Medieval and Renaissance Group/UWA Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies Annual Conference

Skin in Medieval and Early Modern Worlds

Perth Medieval and Renaissance Group/UWA Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies Annual Conference

13 October 2018

From the organisators website :

Keynote Speaker: Dr Lisa Beaven (La Trobe University), ‘Living Flesh: Splendor, Sex and Sickness on the Surface of the Skin’.

Skin as a material served a vital role in premodern economies. It was an essential ingredient in clothing and tools, and it formed the primary material for the manuscripts on which knowledge and ideas were recorded and preserved. Beyond the many uses for the skins of animals, the idea of skin interested artists, scholars, and theologians. As a boundary or surface, skin presented a range of symbolic possibilities. Images of skin, such as its piercing, often acted as metaphors for the uncovering of secrets or the interpretation of allegory. Premodern observers, likewise, often believed that the appearance and colour of an individual’s skin indicated truths about their inner nature. Diseases of the skin, such as leprosy, attracted legislation and intellectual speculation, drawing together the immaterial world of ideas regarding skin and the treatment of actual human skins.

We are interested in papers that address the many premodern uses of skin, as well representations of and ideas about skin. This conference is multidisciplinary and wide-ranging; we welcome papers from the fields of book culture and manuscript studies, history, material culture, medicine, disability studies, race studies, crime and punishment, art, literature, and theology.

The conference organisers invite proposals for 20-minute papers.

Please send a paper title, 250-word abstract, and a short (no more than 100-word) biography to pmrg.cmems.conference@gmail.com by 31 May 2018.

 

 

More infos on the organisators website.

New book – Trauma in Medieval Society – by Wendy J. Turner and Christina Lee

Trauma in Medieval Society

Series: Explorations in Medieval Culture, Volume: 7

 

 

Submary from the editor website:

Trauma in Medieval Society is an edited collection of articles from a variety of scholars on the history of trauma and the traumatised in medieval Europe. Looking at trauma as a theoretical concept, as part of the literary and historical lives of medieval individuals and communities, this volume brings together scholars from the fields of archaeology, anthropology, history, literature, religion, and languages. The collection offers insights into the physical impairments from and psychological responses to injury, shock, war, or other violence—either corporeal or mental. From biographical to socio-cultural analyses, these articles examine skeletal and archival evidence as well as literary substantiation of trauma as lived experience in the Middle Ages.

Contributors are Carla L. Burrell, Sara M. Canavan, Susan L. Einbinder, Michael M. Emery, Bianca Frohne, Ronald J. Ganze, Helen Hickey, Sonja Kerth, Jenni Kuuliala, Christina Lee, Kate McGrath, Charles-Louis Morand Métivier, James C. Ohman, Walton O. Schalick, III, Sally Shockro, Patricia Skinner, Donna Trembinski, Wendy J. Turner, Belle S. Tuten, Anne Van Arsdall, and Marit van Cant.

More info on the editor website.

Medieval Medicine – London Medieval Society Colloquium – 5th May 2018 – London

Medieval Medicine –
London Medieval Society Colloquium
Saturday 5th May 2018,


Join us to explore medieval medicine at this one day colloquium with papers ranging from medical expertise and remedies in England and Normandy and the dissemination of Arabic and Persian medical works in Byzantium to the mapping the medieval brain and the origins of public health. Guest speakers include Alison Hudson (British Library), Elma Brenner (Wellcome Institute), Petros Bouras-Vallianatos (King’s College London), Bill MacLehose (UCL) and Peregrine Horden (Royal Holloway). A wine reception which will immediately follow the colloquium.


Programme:
10.45 Registration
11.00 ‘Feeling no Pain? Remedies and Rhetoric in England c.1000’,
Alison Hudson (British Library).
11.45 ‘Medical Expertise in Medieval Normandy’,
Elma Brenner (Wellcome Institute)
12.30 Lunch
1.30 ‘The Dissemination of Arabic and Persian Medical Works in Byzantium’,
Petros Bouras-Vallianatos (King’s College London)
2.15 ‘The Normal and the Pathological: Mapping the Brain in Medieval Medicine’,
Bill MacLehose (UCL)
3.00 Coffee
3.30 ‘The Origins of European Public Health?’
Peregrine Horden (Royal Holloway)
4.15 Round Table (Chair: Daniel McCann, Lincoln College, Oxford)
5.00 Wine Reception
Information:
Find about more on the london medieval society website:

Disability in Latin Medieval Philosophy and Theology Disability in Latin Medieval Philosophy and Theology conference – April 26–28, 2018 – Notre Dame University

Disability in Latin Medieval Philosophy and Theology Disability in Latin Medieval Philosophy and Theology conference

April 26–28, 2018

McKenna Hall Notre Dame Conference Center

Programme :

Organizers:     Prof. Richard Cross (richard.cross@nd.edu)

Prof. Scott M. Williams (swillia8@unca.edu)

 

Thursday, April 26th, 2018

3:00-3:30pm    Coffee & Snacks

 

3:30-4:50pm  –  Kevin Timpe, “Thomas Aquinas on Disability” (Calvin College)

Chair: Christina van Dyke (Calvin College)

Commentator: Richard Cross (University of Notre Dame)

 

Friday, April 27th, 2018

8:15-9:00am    Breakfast & Coffee for All

 

9:00-10:20am  –  Gloria Frost, “Congenital Disabilities” (University of St. Thomas)  (via Skype)

Chair: Miguel Romero (Salve Regina University)

Commentator: Scott M. Williams (UNC Asheville)

 

10:35-11:55am  –  John Slotemaker, “Aquinas and Ockham on the Imago Dei and Intellectual Disabilities”

Chair: Mark K. Spencer (University of St. Thomas)

Commentator: Miguel Romero (Salve Regina University)

 

12-1:30pm    Lunch for all

 

1:30-2:50pm  –  Scott M. Williams, “Ableism, Medieval Concepts of Personhood, and Imago Dei Trinitatis

Chair: Richard Cross (University of Notre Dame)

Commentator: John Slotemaker (Fairfield University)

 

3:05-4:25pm  –  Miguel Romero, “Interpreting amentia in the Aristotelian-Thomistic Tradition: 16th Century Spanish Colonialism and the Disappearance of a Latin Medieval Account of Cognitive Impairment”

Chair: Thomas Ward (Baylor University)

Commentator: Mark K. Spencer (University of St. Thomas)

 

 

Saturday, April 28th, 2018

8:15-9:00am    Breakfast & Coffee for All

 

9:00-10:20am  –  Christina van Dyke, “Taking the ‘Dis’ out of Disability: Martyrs, Mystics, and Mothers in the Middle Ages” (Calvin College)

Chair: Kevin Timpe (Calvin College)

Commentator: Scott M. Williams (UNC Asheville)

 

10:35-11:55am  –  Mark K. Spencer, “Separated Souls: Disability in the Intermediate State”

Chair: Richard Cross (University of Notre Dame)

Commentator: Thomas Ward (Baylor University)

 

12-1:30pm    Lunch for all

 

1:30-2:50pm  –  Richard Cross, “Disabilities in Heaven”

Chair: Scott M. Williams (UNC Asheville)

Commentator: Christina van Dyke (Calvin College)

 

3:05-4:25pm – Thomas Ward, “Thomas Aquinas and Duns Scotus: Disabilities and the Beatific Vision”

Chair: John Slotemaker (Fairfield University)

Commentator: Kevin Timpe (Calvin College)

 

4:35-5:15 – Closing Panel Session with Conference Speakers

Chair: Scott M. Williams (UNC Asheville)

More infos on the university of Notre Dame website.

Mental Illness in Ancient Medicine. From Celsus to Paul of Aegina – by Chiara Thumiger and P. N. Singer

Mental Illness in Ancient Medicine. From Celsus to Paul of Aegina

By Chiara Thumiger and P. N. Singer

publication Brill 2018

 

Summary from the publisher :

In Mental Illness in Ancient Medicine: From Celsus to Paul of Aegina a detailed account is given, by a range of experts in the field, of the development of different conceptualizations of the mind and its pathology by medical authors from the beginning of the imperial period to the seventh century CE. New analysis is offered, both of the dominant texts of Galen and of such important but neglected figures as Rufus, Archigenes, Athenaeus of Attalia, Aretaeus, Caelius Aurelianus and the Byzantine ‘compilers’. The work of these authors is considered both in its medical-historical context and in relation to philosophical and theological debates – on ethics and on the nature of the soul – with which they interacted.

 

More on the publisher website.

CFP – Society for the Social History of Medicine Conference 2018 – Conformity, Resistance, Dialogue and Deviance in Health and Medicine Liverpool, 11-13 July 2018.

Society for the Social History of Medicine Conference 2018

Conformity, Resistance, Dialogue and Deviance in Health and Medicine

Liverpool, 11-13 July 2018

Hosted by The Centre for the Humanities and Social Sciences of Health, Medicine and Technology

The Society for the Social History of Medicine hosts a major, biennial, international, and interdisciplinary conference, and from 11-13 July 2018 it will meet in Liverpool to explore the theme of ‘Conformity, Resistance, Dialogue and Deviance in Health and Medicine’.

This broad theme plays on several levels. It reflects local Liverpool health heritage as a site of public health innovation; independent and at times radical approaches to health politics, health inequalities, health determinants, treatment and therapies (including technological innovation, community and collective practices, and the use of arts in health).

Call for Papers

Upcoming SSHM Events

The Society for the Social History of Medicine hosts a major biennial, international, and interdisciplinary conference. From 11-13 July 2018 it will meet in Liverpool to explore the theme of ‘Conformity, Resistance, Dialogue and Deviance in Health and Medicine’.

This broad theme plays on several levels. It reflects local Liverpool health heritage as a site of public health innovation; independent and at times radical approaches to health politics, health inequalities, health determinants, treatment and therapies (including technological innovation, community and collective practices, and the use of arts in health).

We envisage that this conference theme will also stimulate participants to think about how medical orthodoxy has been shaped and re-molded, and how patients and practitioners choose to conform to conventional practices, seek alternatives, resist or compromise. The theme further facilitates a transnational conference strand, examining the construction of, and attitudes towards, Western and other medical traditions and health systems. In light of this theme, the 2018 conference committee encourages papers, sessions, round-tables and other interventions that examine, challenge, and refine histories of conformity, resistance, dialogue and deviance in medicine and health. These might be set in relation to inclusions, exclusions and injustices; insiders, outsiders and mediators; peoples, places and cultures; and diverse and expanding new social histories of health and medicine.

But the biennial conference is not exclusive in terms of its theme, and reflects the diversity of the discipline of the social history of medicine. Proposals that consider all topics relevant to histories of health and medicine broadly conceived are invited. Nor are submissions restricted to any area of study: we welcome a range of disciplinary approaches, time periods and geographical contexts. Submissions from scholars across the range of career stages are most welcome, and especially from postgraduate and early career researchers.

Possible topics include:

  • Health and medicine in colonial, postcolonial and transnational contexts
  • The political economy of health and medicine
  • Theories and practices of conformity and deviancy in health and medicine
  • New ways of framing working within the social history of medicine
  • Radical politics and resistance to dominant medical knowledge and practice
  • Critical theory and social movements such as feminist, postcolonial, disability and queer theory and activism in relation to health and medicine
  • Relations between different cultures of health and medicine
  • Inequalities of health and medical care
  • Public health
  • The environment and health
  • Animals, disease and health
  • Work and health
  • Arts and health
  • Popular representations of health and medicine

Individual submissions should include a 250 word abstract, including five key words and a one paragraph CV/resume with contact information.
Panel submissions should include three papers (each with a 250 word abstract, including five key words and a short CV), a chair, and a 100-word panel abstract.
Round table submissions should include the names of four participants (each with a short CV), a chair, a 500-word abstract and five key words.
We also invite poster presentations, short films and ideas for new sessions.

Deadline for Proposals
Friday 2 February 2018
sshm2018@liverpool.ac.uk

Bursaries

The Society offers bursaries to assist students in meeting the financial costs of attending the conference. Find out more and how to apply here.

New book – Prosthesis in Medieval and Early Modern Culture – Edited by Chloe Porter, Katie L. Walter, Margaret Healy

Prosthesis in Medieval and Early Modern Culture

Edited by Chloe Porter, Katie L. Walter, Margaret Healy

2018 Routledge

Description by the editor :

« ‘Prosthesis’ denotes a rhetorical ‘addition’ to a pre-existing ‘beginning’, a ‘replacement’ for that which is ‘defective or absent’, a technological mode of ‘correction’ that reveals a history of corporeal and psychic discontent. Recent scholarship has given weight to these multiple meanings of ‘prosthesis’ as tools of analysis for literary and cultural criticism. The study of pre-modern prosthesis, however, often registers as an absence in contemporary critical discourse.

This collection seeks to redress this omission, reconsidering the history of prosthesis and its implications for contemporary critical responses to, and uses of, it. The book demonstrates the significance of notions of prosthesis in medieval and early modern theological debate, Reformation controversy, and medical discourse and practice. It also tracks its importance for imaginings of community and of the relationship of self and other, as performed on the stage, expressed in poetry, charms, exemplary and devotional literature, and as fought over in the documents of religious and cultural change. Interdisciplinary in nature, the book engages with contemporary critical and cultural theory and philosophy, genre theory, literary history, disability studies, and medical humanities, establishing prosthesis as a richly productive analytical tool in the pre-modern, as well as the modern, context. This book was originally published as a special issue of the Textual Practice journal. »

More infos on the editor website !

CFP – ‘Objects, Extensions, Prosthetics: The Body and Subjectivity in the Pre-Modern Period’ – 28th Feb 2018 – Newcastle University.

Objects, Extensions, Prosthetics: The Body and Subjectivity in the Pre-Modern Period

Wednesday 28th February 2018, 1-6pm Newcastle University.

We invite postgraduates and early career researchers based in the North to give short (15 minute) talks at an afternoon seminar event on Wednesday 28th February 2018. This event will include a key note from Professor Helen Smith (University of York) in response to the talks given and a group discussion of the topics to close, as well as a free lunch included. The seminar will focus on how objects function as extensions of the self the medieval and early modern period. Can objects be sites of emotional or literary expression? Do they reflect pre-modern notions vi interior/exterior selves? Can they be considered as Metonymic’ substitutions for the self? We invite PGRs/ECRs to present on this theme a, well as partake in group discussions over the course of the afternoon. Topics might include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • The body (skin, hair)
  • Fashion (clothing, textiles)
  • Prosthetics
  • Books (print., literary or personal, notebooks)
  • Stage props (/object and costumes)
  • Household items
  • Religious/sacred objects

If you would like to get involved with this seminar event and give a short paper, please send an expression of interest along with topic details (no more than 200 words) no later than 15thJanuary 2018. and/or any queries. to Emily Rowe – e.c.rowe2@newcastle.ac.uk

Meeting – International Workshop “Gender(ed) Histories of Health, Healing and the Body, 1250-1550” – 25/26 jan. 2018 at a.r.t.e.s. Cologne

International Workshop “Gender(ed) Histories of Health, Healing and the Body, 1250-1550”

Thursday, January 25 to Friday, January 26 2018 / a.r.t.e.s. Graduate School for the Humanities Cologne, Aachener Str. 217, 50931 Cologne

 

Participation is free, to register please send an email to Eva Cersovky (cersovse@uni-koeln.de) by Friday, January 19, 2018.

This international workshop aims at systematically exploring the manifold relations between gender, health and healing during the 13th to 16th centuries, situating them at the nexus of medical, social, cultural, religious and economic concerns. Speakers focus on areas of the field which still require additional and more comprehensive attention with regard to gender, e.g. the household as a site of giving and receiving care but also of producing medicine, the healing and caring practices of religious women, the role of miscellanies or print in disseminating medical and bodily knowledge as well as perceptions of disability, infertility and age, to only name a few. Considering how distinct forms of healing were gendered in different texts and contexts and by different groups of people, speakers employ a wide variety of sources from a number of European countries as well as the Arabic world, ranging from medical treatise and recipes to hagiography and archival documents of practice as well as literary, visual and material sources. The workshop brings together historians from five countries, different disciplines and at all career stages, providing a forum for international discussion and reflection upon methodological and theoretical frameworks of the field.

 

Programm

Thursday, 25 January 2018

10:00-10:30: Eva-Maria Cersovsky and Ursula Gießmann (both Univ. of Cologne): Welcome and Introduction

10:30-11:30 KEYNOTE: Sharon Strocchia (Emory Univ.): The Politics of Household Medicine at the Early Medici Court

11:30-11:45: Coffee Break

SESSION I: SOURCES OF RELIGIOUS HEALING
Chair: Sabine von Heusinger (Univ. of Cologne)

11:45-12:30: Sara M. Ritchey (Univ. of Tennessee): Foliated Healing: Miscellanies as Sources for Gendered Medical Practice in the Late Medieval Low Countries

12:30-13:15: Krisztina Ilko (Univ. of Cambridge): Friars, Women, and Saints. Investigating Healing Miracles of the Early Augustinian Beati

13:15-14:45: Lunch

14:45-15:30: Iliana Kandzha (Central European Univ. Budapest): Female Saints as Agents of Female Healing?: Issues of Gendered Practices and Patronage in the Cult of St Cunigunde (1200-1350)

SESSION II: PRODUCING, TRANSMITTING AND APPLYING KNOWLEDGE
Chair: Bernhard Hollick (Univ. of Cologne / GHI London)

15:30-16:15: Linda Ehrsam Voigts (Univ. of Missouri): Women and Medical Distillation at a Great Household in Late-Medieval England

16:15-16:45: Coffee Break

16:45-17:30: Belle S. Tuten (Juniata College): Care of the Breast in Late Medieval Medicine

17:30-18:15: Julia Gruman Martins (Univ. of London): Understanding/Controlling the Female Body in Ten Recipes: Print and the Dissemination of Medical Knowledge about Women in the Early 16th Century

Friday, 26 January 2018

SESSION III: INFIRMITY AND CARE
Chair: Letha Böhringer (Univ. of Cologne)

09:00-09:45: Donna Trembinski (St. Francis Xavier Univ.): At the Intersection of Sex and Gender: Infirm Masculinities and Femininities in the Thirteenth Century

09:45-10:30: Cordula Nolte (Univ. of Bremen): Domestic Care in the 15th and 16th Centuries: Expectations, Experiences, and Practices from a Gendered Perspective

10:30-11:00: Coffee Break

11:00-11:45: Eva-Maria Cersovsky (Univ. of Cologne): Ubi non est mulier, gemescit egens: Gendered Discourses of Care during the Later Middle Ages

SESSION IV: (IN)FERTILITY AND REPRODUCTION
Chair: Ursula Gießmann (Univ. of Cologne)

11:45-12:30: Catherine Rider (Univ. of Exeter): Gender, Old Age, and the Infertile Body in Medieval Medicine

12:30-13:30: Lunch

13:30-14:15: Lauren Wood (Univ. of California): Si Non Caste Tamen Caute: Contraception and Abortion in the Middle Ages

14:15-15:00: Ayman Yasin Atat (TU Braunschweig): Dealing with Menstrual Disorders in Arabic/Ottoman Medicine

15:00-15:30: Concluding discussion

Journée d’étude – « Soigner au Moyen Âge », le 9 janvier 2018 à l’espace Mendès France de Poitiers

Soigner au Moyen Âge

9 Janvier 2018 à  10 h 00

POITIERS (86) | Espace Mendès France

Journée d’études sous la direction scientifique de Laurence Moulinier-Brogi, professeur d’histoire médiévale, université Lumière-Lyon 2, membre du CIHAM-UMR 5648.

9h30 – Accueil

10h-10h30 – Mot de bienvenue par Didier Moreau, directeur de l’Espace Mendès France et introduction par Martin Aurell, directeur du Centre d’études supérieures de civilisation médiévale (CESCM), université de Poitiers et Laurence Moulinier-Brogi

10h30-11h15Les formes de la relation patient-médecin au Moyen Âge par Marilyn Nicoud, professeur d’Histoire médiévale, université d’Avignon et des Pays du Vaucluse, CIHAM-UMR 5648

11h15-11h30 – Questions

11h30-12h15Soigner du poison à la fin du Moyen Âge. Des écrits spécialisés ? par Franck Collard, professeur d’Histoire médiévale, université Paris-Nanterre, CHISCO-EA 1587

12h15-12h30 – Questions

12h30 – Déjeuner

14h-14h45Le rôle du vin dans la médecine médiévale par Azélina Jaboulet-Vercherre, docteur en Histoire, EPHE, IVe Section, Visiting Professor, IEP, Paris

14h45-15h – Questions

15h-15h45Soigner et transmettre au XIIe siècle : « magister Egidius » par Mireille Ausécache, docteur en Histoire, EPHE, IVe Section

15h45-16h – Questions

16h-16h15 – Pause

16h15-17hErreurs médicales, échecs et tromperies par Laurence Moulinier-Brogi, professeur d’histoire médiévale, université Lumière-Lyon 2, membre du CIHAM-UMR 5648

17h15-17h30 – Conclusion

En partenariat avec le Centre d’études supérieures de civilisation médiévale (CESCM) de l’université de Poitiers dans le cadre de l’Atelier interdisciplinaire.

Information à retrouver sur le site web de l’espace Mendès France.

History of Disease, Disability & Medicine in Medieval Europe