CFP – International Piers Plowman Society – Miami April 4 – 6 , 2019

Call for Papers – International Piers Plowman Society

Meeting Miami, April 4 – 6 , 2019 – Due Date for Submissions: September 7 , 2018

 

7. Medicine and the Body in Piers Plowman : A Roundtable

Organizer, Laura Godfrey, University of Connecticut (la ra.godfrey@uconn.edu)

Scholars have traditionally read the medical language, characters, and practices in Piers Plowman as symbolic of salvation, reducing actual medical practice to metaphor and symbolism. Recent scholarly turns to the body recenter the body in literary texts through attention to the somatic experiences described through allegory, satire, and personification. This roundtable invites papers that interrogate illness and remedy, the body and embodiment, the senses, and the theory and practice of medicine in Piers Plowman and alliterative poetry.

 

16 . Disability in the Age of Piers Plowman

Organizer: Rick Godden, Louisiana State University (rgodden1@lsu.edu)

This session will explore the representations of disability and impairment in the fourteen th century, especially withi n Piers Plowman or related texts. Langland reveals the fourteenth century’s ambivalent and multifaceted attitude toward disability and impairment. Characters in the poe m often treat disabled figures with either love or skepticism. On one hand, those who are too infirm to work are excused from the demands of labor, and are deemed worthy of charity and God’s love. On the other, there are “faitours” who readily assume the g uise of impairment in order to deceive and evade the duty to work. Will himself is interrogated by Reason in the C – Text about his inability to work, and he cites his own embodied difference, being too tall, as a justification. This session invites papers that examine disability in medieval literature from a variety of methodological approaches. Are there different representations of disability across the versions of Piers Plowman ? How do representations of disability in the poem intersect with legal, theol ogical, or social concerns in the fourteenth century? How do writers contemporary to Langland treat disability? What is the role of physical, cognitive, or s omatic impairment in the poem? How can we put the poem into conversation with Disability Studies? How does a consideration of disability in Piers Plowman reorient or contribute to current work on Langland? To medieval Disability Studies?

 

More info on the conference’s website

CFP – The Body and the Text: Medical Humanities and Medieval Literature, c. 1150 – 1550 Leeds International Medieval Congress, 1-4 July 2019

The Body and the Text: Medical Humanities and Medieval Literature, c. 1150 – 1550

Leeds International Medieval Congress, 1-4 July 2019

Recent years have witnessed a surge in scholarship in the field of the Medical Humanities. In considering medicine in its cultural and social contexts, the Medical Humanities has symbolised a ‘paradigm shift away from what might be called medical reductionism to medical holism, where patients are not reduced to diseases and bodies but rather are seen as whole persons in contexts and in relations’ (Cole et al, 2015:8). In seeking to merge disciplines and foster interactive dialogues, this area of research is inherently inclusive, dynamic, and elastic. Furthermore, since the topics of science, medicine, eith physiology, religion, astrology, and magic were often discussed withinh the same medieval texts and contexts, te multidisciplinarity of the Medical Humanities is particularly apt for Medieval Studies.

We therefore seek to put together a session or sessions on Medieval Literature and the Medical Humanities. Our focus is global and will include proposals from two complementary directions: how are medicine, health and wellbeing represented in medieval and early modern literature? How may literary texts from this period contribute to training and practice in the Medical Humanities?

Proposals may include but are not confined to the following: Representations of health and sickness in literary texts;

  • Depictions of medical knowledge, practice and practitioners in literary texts;
  • Representations of the senses and / or emotions;
  • The relationship between medicine and religion in the Middle Ages;
  • Engagement with texts (reading and listening) as a therapeutic practice in the Middle Ages;
  • A consideration of how medieval literature might contribute to training and practice in the Medical Humanities;
  • Defining the Medical Humanities in a medieval context.

Abstracts of no more than 300 words should be submitted to the session organisers Dr Alison Williams (a.j.williams@swansea…uk) and It Laura Kalas Williams (I.e.williams@swansea.ac.uk) by 31 August 2018.

Colloquium – Asclepius, the Paintbrush, and the Pen: Representations of Disease in Medieval and Early Modern European Art and Literature – May 4/5 – CMRS Medical Humanities Conference (UCLA)

CMRS Medical Humanities Conference

Asclepius, the Paintbrush, and the Pen: Representations of Disease in Medieval and Early Modern European Art and Literature

May 4May 5

Humanity has always approached disease with a mixture of curiosity and dread. Medieval and early modern people were no exception, displaying a deep fascination with virulent ailments and all sorts of physical deformities. But despite this a attraction, few artists of these eras engaged in the depiction of disease. When they did, their expression was particular to the medium used and differed among artists even when using the same medium. Since such an effort was outside their norm, what factors drove them to pick up pen or brush to approach maladies as a subject of esthetic expression? How did the artists’ experiences influence their choices in portraying disease? Were these depictions the result of something that interfered with their intent to faithfully reproduce the best of nature, or do they reflect a rebellion against what we generally assume to be the period`s artistic and literary quest: the portrayal of spiritual beauty and, later, the rediscovered beauty of the human body?

This conference, organized by Professor Massimo Ciavolella (Italian, UCLA) and Professor Rinaldo Canalis, MD (David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA), engages these questions and the contemporary perspective they elicit.

Funding for this symposium is provided by the Endowment for the UCLA Center for Medieval & Renaissance Studies.

 

SATURDAY, MAY 5, 2018 | UCLA ROYCE HALL 314
8:30 AM Registration, coffee
9:00 Welcoming Remarks
Session I | Allison Collins (UCLA), chair
9:15 Francis Wells (Royal Papworth Hospital, Cambridge)
“The Role of the Decorative Arts in Disease”
10:00 Break
10:15 Joachim Küpper (Freie Universität Berlin)
“Malady in Literary Texts from the Medieval and the Early Modern Periods – Some Hypotheses On a Paradoxical Constellation”
11:00 Break
11:15 Gaia Gubbini (Freie Universität Berlin)
“Leprosy, Melancholy, Folly, and their Representations in Medieval French Literature”
12:00 PM Break
12:15 Alain Touwaide (UCLA, The Huntington, and Institute for the Preservation of Medical Traditions )
“The Art of Medicine in Byzantium: Disease and Disability in Byzantine Manuscripts”
1:00 Lunch Break
Session II | Rinaldo Canalis (UCLA), chair
2:15 Domenico Bertoloni Meli (Indiana University Bloomington)
“Textures of Lesions – Textures of Prints”
3:00 Break
3:15 Manuela Gallerani (Università di Bologna)
“Illness in art and art in illness: reflections based on paradigmatic works by Italian Renaissance artists”
4:00 Break
4:15 Sara Frances Burdorff (UCLA)
“‘Yet have I in me something dangerous’: Demonopathy, the Pox, and the Melancholy Dane in Shakespeare’s Hamlet
SATURDAY, MAY 5, 2018 | UCLA ROYCE HALL 314
9:00 Coffee
Session III | Monique Kornell (CMRS Associate), chair
9:30 Valeria Finucci (Duke University)
“The King and the Art of Brain Surgery”
10:15 Break
10:30 Alfonso Paolella (University of Naples)
“The ‘mal franzoso’ between art, history and literature. Paracelso and Della Porta”
11:15 Break
11:30 Efraín Kristal (UCLA)
“Nicolas Poussin’s ‘The Plague at Ashdod’ and the French Disease”
12:15 Lunch Break
Session IV | Guendalina Ajello Mahler (CMRS Associate )
1:30 Jenni Kuuliala (University of Tampere)
“Miracle and the Monstrous: Disability and Deviant Bodies in the Late Middle Ages”
2:15 Break
2:30 Lori Jones (University of Ottawa)
“‘Fevers, Botches, and Carbuncles’: Describing the Plague in Late Medieval and Early Modern Medical Treatises”
3:15 Break
3:30 Roberto Fedi (Università per Stranieri di Perugia)
“The Ailing Artist”
4:15 Concluding Remarks

 

Sessions on Disability in the Middle Ages at ICMS Kalamazoo – 10/13 may 2018

Sessions on Disability in the Middle Ages at ICMS Kalamazoo

10/13 may 2018

 

Thursday 10 am

33 – BERNHARD 204
Medicine and Magic I: Healing Bodies
Sponsor: Societas Magica
Organizer: Marla Segol, Univ. at Buffalo
Presider: David Porreca, Univ. of Waterloo
1. Eating Words: Medical Charms as Healing Relics in Medieval England
Katherine Hindley, Nanyang Technological Univ.
2. Magical Plants in the Healing Arts
Helga Ruppe, Western Univ.
3. Occult Diagnosis: Physiognomy and the Medical Academy
Kira L. Robison, Univ. of Tennessee–Chattanooga

 

Thursday 1:30 pm

80 – BERNHARD 204
Medicine and Magic II: Healing Souls
Sponsor: Societas Magica
Organizer: Marla Segol, Univ. at Buffalo
Presider: Phillip A. Bernhardt-House, Skagit Valley College–Whidbey Island
1. Healing-Place for the Soul: Magic and Medicine in the Ancient Egyptian Library
Mark Roblee, Univ. of Massachusetts–Amherst
2. Embryologies: Medical and Ritual
Marla Segol
3. A Thirteenth-Century Version of the Almandal : Newly Discovered and Described for the First Time
Vajra Regan, Univ. of Toronto

 

Thursday 3:30

 

117 – SCHNEIDER 1255
A Science of the Human: Medical Discourse as a Way of Knowing
Sponsor: Italians and Italianists at Kalamazoo
Organizer: Matteo Pace, Columbia Univ.
Presider: Matteo Pace
1. Human Nature in, instead of beyond, Nature: A Reading of the Philosophical
Implications of the Commedia ’s Embryology
Humberto Ballesteros, Columbia Univ.
2. Dante and Medieval Medicine: Charting Connections between the Commedia and His Other Works
Paola Ureni, College of Staten Island and Graduate Center, CUNY
3. Petrarca and Botany: A Discourse on Healing
Theresa Holler, Univ. Bern
——————-
Friday, May 11 – 8:30 a.m.
East Ballroom, Bernhard Center
“Salvation is Medicine” – The Medieval Production and Gendered Erasures of
Therapeutic Knowledge
By Sara Ritchey (Univ. of Tennessee–Knoxville)
Sponsored by the Medieval Academy of America

 

Friday 10 am

211 – BERNHARD BROWN & GOLD ROOM
Medical Texts in Manuscript Culture
Sponsor: Medieval Academy of America
Organizer: Monica H. Green, Arizona State Univ.; Sara Ritchey, Univ. of
Tennesee–Knoxville
Presider: Monica H. Green
1. How to Read Bodies: Medicine, Mary, and Miracles in an Anglo-Norman Manuscript
Winston Black, Assumption College
2. Palliative Care for Life with Bodleian Library, Canonici Misc. 74
Amy V. Ogden, Univ. of Virginia
3. Healing through Words: Amulets, Formulae, and Spells in Medieval Hebrew Manuscripts on Women’s Health Care
Carmen Caballero Navas, Univ. de Granada

 

212 – SANGREN 1320
Vulnerability in the Middle Ages
Organizer: Hollis Shaul, Princeton Univ.
Presider: Elise Wang, Duke Univ.
1. The Wounded Knight-Healer: Corporeal Communities in the Old French Lancelot Grail
Mae Lyons-Penner, Stanford Univ.
2. Bodies before the Law: Ordeal and Legal Vulnerability in Medieval Iberia
Rachel Q. Welsh, New York Univ.
3. Peasant Perspectives on Protection and Vulnerability
Abigail Sargent, Princeton Univ.
4. Voices of the Vulnerable: Persuasion and Power in Robert Henryson’s Moral Fables
Emily Mahan, Univ. of Notre Dame

 

Friday – 1:30 PM

241 – SCHNEIDER 1220
Inclusion and Exclusion in the Middle Ages I
Sponsor: Program in Medieval Studies, Princeton Univ.
Organizer: Helmut Reimitz, Princeton Univ.
Presider: William Chester Jordan, Princeton Univ.
1. Urban Violence: Riot Culture and Dynamics in Late Antique Eastern
David A. Heayn, Graduate Center, CUNY
2. Christians under Islamic Rule: The Benefits of Collaboration and Inclusion
Chris Prejean, Univ. of California–Los Angeles
3. Inclusivity and Exclusivity in the Transmission of Poetic Knowledge in Early
Medieval Japan
Malgorzata Citko, Univ. of Hawaii–Manoa
4. At the Crossroads of Kingship and Disability: The Case of Baldwin IV of Jerusalem
Samantha Summers, Queen’s Univ. Kingston

 

267 – BERNHARD 212
Medicine in Cities: Public Health and Medical Professions
Sponsor: Medica: The Society for the Study of Healing in the Middle Ages
Organizer: William H. York, Portland State Univ.
Presider: William H. York
1. Minds in the Gutter: Plague, Sin, and Blame in Late Medieval Valencia
Abigail Agresta, Queen’s Univ. Kingston
2. Leprosy and Society in Medieval Bologna, 1100–1350
Courtney A. Krolikoski, McGill Univ.
3. “Per Modum Radicis”: Cultural Webs between Physicians and Poets in Duecento Bologna
Matteo Pace, Columbia Univ.
4. Pharmacy and Health Care in Late Byzantine Constantinople
Petros Bouras-Vallianatos, King’s College London

 

274 – SANGREN 1740
Tenth Anniversary Roundtable: Medieval Disability Studies, Then and Now (A Roundtable)
Sponsor: Society for the Study of Disability in the Middle Ages
Organizer: Joshua Eyler, Rice Univ.
Presider: Cameron Hunt McNabb, Southeastern Univ.
1. Survival
Christopher Baswell, Barnard College
2. Assessing the State of Medieval Disability Studies (by Editing a Scholarly Collection)
Kisha G. Tracy, Fitchburg State Univ.; John P. Sexton, Bridgewater State Univ.
3. Medieval Disability, or, What We Would Call Disability Today
Leah Pope Parker, Univ. of Wisconsin–Madison
4. Where There Were Few, Now There Are Many: The Future of Medieval Disability Studies?
Wendy J. Turner, Augusta Univ.
5. From Saint to Supercrip: Tracing the Inspiration Narrative from the Middle Ages to Modernity
Jessica Chace, New York Univ.
6. The Terms We Use
Joshua Eyler
7. Medieval Disability Studies: Looking Forward, Looking Back
Tory V. Pearman, Miami Univ. Hamilton

 

Friday 3:30 pm

 

330 – SANGREN 1740
Invisible Disabilities
Sponsor: Society for the Study of Disability in the Middle Ages
Organizer: Joshua Eyler, Rice Univ.
Presider: Joshua Eyler
1. Disabling Pride in the Pricke of Conscience
Michael Calabrese, California State Univ.–Los Angeles
2. Invisible and Intermittent: Markedness, Loss of Mind, and Communities in Later Medieval Miracle Stories
Leigh Ann Craig, Virginia Commonwealth Univ.
3. Deafness: Invisibility as Feignability, Silence as Affirmation
Julie Singer, Washington Univ. in St. Louis

 

324 – BERNHARD 212
Military Medicine: Wounds and Disease in Warfare
Sponsor: Medica: The Society for the Study of Healing in the Middle Ages
Organizer: William H. York, Portland State Univ.
Presider: Linda M. Keyser, Medica
1. Early Use of Medical Triage in the Saga of Saint Olaf
Theodore Cunningham, School of Medicine, Western Michigan Univ.
2. Controversial Wound Treatment by Three Medieval Surgeons: Hugh of Lucca,
Theodoric of Cervia, and Henry of Mondeville
Leigh Whaley, Acadia Univ.
3. Plague and the Great Company of 1361
Nicole Archambeau, Colorado State Univ.

 

Saturday 1:30

 

399 – VALLEY 2 GARNEAU LOUNGE
Corruption of Manly Men in Late Medieval England
Sponsor: Medieval Association of the Midwest (MAM)
Organizer: Matthew O’Donnell, Indiana Univ.–Bloomington
Presider: Matthew O’Donnell
1. “He shall nat be hole longe afftir”: Disabling Gawain in Le Morte Darthur
Kristin Bovaird-Abbo, Univ. of Northern Colorado
2. “Swiche Werk”: Performing Masculinity in Sir Orfeo
Walter Wadiak, Lafayette College
3. What Do Men Really Want? Desire in Sir Gawain and the Green Knight
Mickey Sweeney, Dominican Univ.

New publication – Book – Viewing Disability in Medieval Spanish Texts by Connie L. Scarborough.

Viewing Disability in Medieval Spanish Texts

by Connie L. Scarborough.

Amsterdam University Press,

Series: Premodern Health, Disease, and Disability

Description by the editor :

« This book is one of the first to examine medieval Spanish canonical works for their portrayals of disability in relationship to theological teachings, legal precepts, and medical knowledge. Connie L. Scarborough shows that physical impairments were seen differently through each lens. Theology at times taught that the disabled were « marked by God, » their sins rendered on their bodies; at other times, they were viewed as important objects of Christian charity. The disabled often suffered legal restrictions, allowing them to be viewed with other distinctive groups, such as the ill or the poor. And from a medical point of view, a miraculous cure could be seen as evidence of divine intervention. This book explores all these perspectives through medieval Spain’s miracle narratives, hagiographies, didactic tales, and epic poetry.  »

More infos on the editor website.