CFP – IMCS Kalamazoo 2019 – The Society for the Study of Disability in the Middle Ages propose 3 themes: Medieval Disability and Pedagogy – Intersections of Race and Disability in the Global Middle Ages – Disability and Public Scholarship.

The Society for the Study of Disability in the Middle Ages Invites Proposals for the International Congress on Medieval StudiesMay 9-12 2019, Kalamazoo, MI

 

Medieval Disability and Pedagogy (a roundtable)

Contributors will discuss the ways in which disability has informed approaches to instruction, how to unite disability pedagogy and scholarship, possible texts for inclusion in the classroom, and selected assignments and activities that involve the medieval disability perspective. Participants will share practical ideas for effective activities, assignments, and readings.

 

Intersections of Race and Disability in the Global Middle Ages (a session of papers)

In this session, contributors will offer papers that explore the intersections between race and disability in the Middle Ages. We particularly seek approaches that consider non-Western, inter-disciplinary perspectives.

 

Disability and Public Scholarship (a session of papers)

In this session, participants will discuss the responsibilities of medieval disability studies to engage in public scholarship, how we can share our own public scholarship, and the ways that we as medieval disability studies scholars can be more active in public scholarship in order to support the value of our research.

Please send 250-word abstracts along with completed Participant Information Form to Tory Pearman at pearmatv@miamioh.edu by September 15.

Because medieval disability studies should pursue inclusive and intersectional scholarship, the SSDMA is committed to including perspectives representative of the diversity of the field and to amplifying voices that are too often marginalized by systemic discrimination in academic employment, publishing, funding, and conference programming

 

More infos on the organisator’s website !

CFP – Histories of Disability: local, global and colonial stories – 7-8 June 2018, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK.

Histories of Disability: local, global and colonial stories

7-8 June 2018, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK.

Back in 2001, the historian of American deafness Douglas Baynton argued that ‘Disability is everywhere in history, once you begin looking for it, but conspicuously absent in the histories we write’ (Baynton, 2001, p. 52). Since then the history of disability has burgeoned with many important studies showing this not only to be a significant field but a vibrant one. But several key areas remain to be thoroughly interrogated. The historiography remains largely limited to America and western Europe, historians have been slow to take up the exciting postcolonial questions explored by literary scholars and sociologists about the relationship between colonialism and disability, and a tendency has remained to treat the western experience of disability as a universal one. This workshop aims to interrogate these biases, shed light on geographical specificity of disability and think more about the global history of disability both empirically and theoretically.

Questions of interest might include, but are not limited to

· How is the experience and construction of disability specific to time and place?

· What is the relationship between the local and the global when considering the history of disability?

· How does disability intersect with other identities (such as race, gender, class and religion)?

· What is the relationship between disability and imperialism/colonialism?

· How can postcolonial theory help us better historicise the experience of disability?

· Does the concept of ‘disability’ itself work outside a western context?

· How are the histories of disability shaped by mobility, movement and travel?

Abstracts of c. 300 words should be sent to Esme Cleall, e.r.cleall@sheffield.ac.uk by 1st December 2017. I’d also be happy to answer any questions.

Contact Info:
Esme Cleall, University of Sheffield, e.r.cleall@sheffield.ac.uk
Contact Email:
e.r.cleall@sheffield.ac.uk