Sessions on health, illness and disability history in kalamazoo 2022!

Carreful : time GMT +2 (Paris summer time)

Monday, May 9, 2022

 

Live Recorded: No

Sponsored By: Societas Magica

    Description
    Magic is hard to define, control, and censure. The use and study of magic overlaps and intersects with various disciplines, practices, and geographical locations. This panel has papers that explore the places where these cross-currents occur in inquisitorial, medicinal, legal, and literary miracles.
     
    Papers

     

    Live Recorded: Yes

    Sponsored By: Society for the Study of Disability in the Middle Ages

      Tuesday, May 10, 2022

       

      Live Recorded: Yes

      Sponsored By: Manuscript Technologies Forum Interest Group, The English Association

        Papers

        5:00 PM – 6:30 PM

         

        Live Recorded: Yes

        Sponsored By: Medieval Romance Society

         

        Live Recorded: No

        Sponsored By: John Gower Society

        Papers

         

        Live Recorded: No

        Sponsored By: Medieval Makars Society

           

          Live Recorded: Yes

          Sponsored By: Manuscript Technologies Forum Interest Group, The English Association

             

            Live Recorded: Yes

            Sponsored By: Medica: The Society for the Study of Healing in the Middle Ages

              11:00 PM – 12:30 AM 

               

              Live Recorded: Yes

                  Papers
                   

                  Live Recorded: Yes

                  Sponsored By: Italians and Italianists at Kalamazoo

                  Wednesday, May 11, 2022

                   

                  Live Recorded: Yes

                  Sponsored By: Medieval Association of the Midwest (MAM)

                     

                    Live Recorded: Yes

                    Sponsored By: International Courtly Literature Society (ICLS), North American Branch

                     

                     

                     

                    Live Recorded: Yes

                    Sponsored By: International Courtly Literature Society (ICLS), North American Branch

                      Friday, May 13, 2022

                       

                      Live Recorded: Yes

                      Sponsored By: Society for the Study of Disability in the Middle Ages

                         

                        Live Recorded: Yes

                         

                        Live Recorded: No

                        Sponsored By: Medieval Association for Rural Studies (MARS)

                           

                          Live Recorded: Yes

                              Saturday, May 14, 2022

                               

                              Live Recorded: Yes

                                   

                                  Live Recorded: No

                                      CFP – Invisible & Under-Represented? Disability History, Objects & Heritage Conference – 22-23 March 2022 (online)

                                       

                                      About Invisible & Under-Represented

                                      The experiences and histories of disabled people, like other marginalised groups, are often absent or hidden the museum or archive. Almost twenty years ago, both Annie Delin (2002) and Catherine Kudlick (2002) separately suggested that the place of disability in our shared past has been ‘buried in the footnotes’ or the ‘unglamorous backwaters of history’. How much has changed? More to the point, how much still needs to change and how might this shape how we look at the material preserved in museums and archives? Disabled people often develop unique relationships with the material world (Ott, 2018), and so perhaps objects offer opportunities to embed disabled people and their histories into the public consciousness.

                                      This student led conference seeks to highlight the work of researchers investigating object based histories of disability and/or the place of disability and disabled people in museums, archives and heritage institutions. We hope to create spaces to foster further discussion around these ideas and methodologies, whilst also reaching out to those unfamiliar with the study of disability or disability history. With this conference we hope to inspire new conversations between the academic and heritage sectors, sparking new ideas about how disability and it’s history can be made more visible in the narratives they construct.

                                      Call For Abstracts

                                      This conference seeks to highlight the work of researchers who are investigating object-based histories of disability and/or the place of disability and disabled people in museums, archives and heritage institutions. The experiences and histories of disabled people, like other marginalised groups, are often absent from the museum or archive. However, due to disabled people’s unique relation to the material world (Ott, 2018), objects can be drawn upon by the heritage industry to bring disabled people and their narratives into the public consciousness.


                                      We hope to create spaces to foster further discussion around these topics, alongside presenting these ideas and methodologies to those not within the study of disability or disability history. Ideally, talks will be orientated both towards those within the academic and heritage sectors, promoting further work between the two. We are particularly keen to highlight work being undertaken by PGRs.

                                       

                                      We welcome abstracts and expressions of interest from all who would like to take part in this conference as a speaker.

                                      Topics Might Include

                                      • Absence/invisibility of disability in museums and archives                                                                                         

                                      • Objects and material culture of disability                                                                                                                  

                                      • Highlighting disability in existing archives and collections                                                                                      

                                      • Methodologies in the study of disability history                                                                                                           

                                      • How we interpret disability historically / the ethics of display                                                                                         

                                      • Democratising disability heritage / barriers to access in academia and heritage                                                                                                                                            

                                      • Activism and museums / Heritage as a site of activism                                                                                           

                                      • Disability in art and heritage                                                                                                                                              

                                      • Changing language and terminology of disability / tackling offensive language in the archive                                                                                                                       

                                      • Disability and other intersectional identities and histories                                                                                           

                                      • Problematic commemoration of disabled people / historical ‘supercrips’

                                       

                                      Submitting an Abstract

                                      Abstracts should be a maximum 200 words, and clearly outline the premise of your proposed 20 minute paper. Please also provide:

                                      • your full name 
                                      • a short biography (Maximum 100 words) 
                                      • an email address that we can contact you on.

                                      Please submit your abstract to underrephistory22@gmail.com by 23:59 (GMT) on Friday 21st January 2022.

                                       

                                      Please note, to ensure accessibility, successful speakers will be contacted to explain any terminology that may need to be explained for BSL translators. For any further accessibility details for speakers, please contact underrephistory22@gmail.com.

                                       

                                      More infos on the editor website

                                      New book – John Henderson, Frederika Jacobs, Jonathan Nelson (eds), Representing Infirmities. Diseased Bodies in Renaissance Italy, London: Routledge, 2020.

                                      Representing Infirmity. Diseased Bodies in Renaissance Italy

                                      Edited ByJohn Henderson, Fredrika Jacobs, Jonathan K. Nelson, 1st Edition, 2020, 272 pages, eBook ISBN9781003032885

                                      This volume is the first in-depth analysis of how infirm bodies were represented in Italy from c. 1400 to 1650. Through original contributions and methodologies, it addresses the fundamental yet undiscussed relationship between images and representations in medical, religious, and literary texts.

                                      This volume is the first in-depth analysis of how infirm bodies were represented in Italy from c. 1400 to 1650. Through original contributions and methodologies, it addresses the fundamental yet undiscussed relationship between images and representations in medical, religious, and literary texts.

                                      Looking beyond the modern category of ‘disease’ and viewing infirmity in Galenic humoral terms, each chapter explores which infirmities were depicted in visual culture, in what context, why, and when. By exploring the works of artists such as Caravaggio, Leonardo, and Michelangelo, this study considers the idealized body altered by diseases, including leprosy, plague, goitre, and cancer. In doing so, the relationship between medical treatment and the depiction of infirmities through miracle cures is also revealed. The broad chronological approach demonstrates how and why such representations change, both over time and across different forms of media. Collectively, the chapters explain how the development of knowledge of the workings and structure of the body was reflected in changed ideas and representations of the metaphorical, allegorical, and symbolic meanings of infirmity and disease.

                                      The interdisciplinary approach makes this study the perfect resource for both students and specialists of the history of art, medicine and religion, and social and intellectual history across Renaissance Europe.

                                      TABLE OF CONTENTS

                                      Part I|67 pages – Approaches to the representation of infirmity

                                      Chapter 1|25 pages – Cancer in Michelangelo’s Night. An Analytical Framework for Retrospective Diagnoses

                                      By Jonathan K. Nelson

                                      Chapter 2|19 pages – The Language of Medicine in Renaissance Preaching

                                      With Peter Howard

                                      Chapter 3|21 pages- Representing Infirmity in Early Modern Florence

                                      By John Henderson

                                      Part II|48 pages – Institutions and visualizing illness

                                      Chapter 4|22 pages – On Display, Poverty as infirmity and its visual representation at the hospital of Santa Maria della Scala in Siena

                                      With Maggie Bell

                                      Chapter 5|24 pages – The Friar as Medico, Picturing leprosy, institutional care, and Franciscan virtues in La Franceschina

                                      With Diana Bullen Presciutti

                                      Part Part III|71 pages – Disease and treatment

                                      Chapter 6|22 pages – The Drama of Infirmity, Cupping in sixteenth-century Italy

                                      With Evelyn Welch

                                      Chapter 7|26 pages – Suffering through it, Visual and textual representations of bodies in surgery in the wake of Lepanto (1571)

                                      With Paolo Savoia

                                      Chapter 8|21 pages – Artistic Representations of Goitre in Early Modern Art in Italy

                                      With Danielle Carrabino

                                      Part IV|59 pages – Saints and miraculous healing

                                      Chapter 9|22 pages – Infirmity in Votive Culture, A case study from the sanctuary of the Madonna dell’Arco, Naples

                                      By Fredrika Jacobs

                                      Chapter 10|20 pages – Infirmity and the Miraculous in the Early Seventeenth Century, The San Carlo cycle of paintings in the Duomo of Milan

                                      With Jenni Kuuliala

                                      Chapter 11|15 pages – Epilogue, Did Mona Lisa suffer from hypothyroidism? Visual representations of sickness and the vagaries of retrospective diagnosis

                                      With Michael Stolberg

                                      More infos on the editor’s website

                                      Call for Book Chapter Proposals – Intersections of Critical Animal Studies and Critical Disability Studies

                                      This edited volume aims to contribute to an emergent body of literature located at the intersection of critical animal studies and critical disability studies. This volume seeks to illuminate innovative ways to theorize and empirically examine the encounters between disabled/non-disabled human and disabled/non-disabled nonhuman animals, while providing a balanced portrait of the different experiences and perspectives of these social actors. This edited volume will be submitted for consideration as part of the Multispecies Encounters series published by Routledge.

                                      The proposed volume will contain 10 to 12 chapters of approximately 20 pages each. Providing for an interdisciplinary view of current work at the intersections of critical animal and disability studies, we welcome submissions from a wide range of academic fields. At this stage, the editors invite book chapter abstracts (250 words maximum) submitted with a tentative title and brief author biography. Please send abstracts for review by December 15, 2018 in a Word format to: Alan Santinele Martino at santina@mcmaster.ca and Sarah May Lindsay at lindsays@mcmaster.ca. Do not hesitate to contact us if you have any questions. We expect to have the book proposal submitted to the publisher by January 31, 2019.

                                      Volume Editors:

                                      Dr. Samantha Hurn (University of Exeter)
                                      Sarah May Lindsay (McMaster University)
                                      Alan Santinele Martino (McMaster University)

                                      CFP – “Disability and the Medieval Cults of Saints: Interdisciplinary and Intersectional Approaches” – edited volume by Stephanie Grace-Petinos, Leah Pope Parker, and Alicia Spencer-Hall

                                      CFP: Disability and the Medieval Cults of Saints: Interdisciplinary and Intersectional Approaches
                                      Discussion published by Massimo Rondolino on Friday, July 27, 2018
                                      Editors: Stephanie Grace-Petinos, Leah Pope Parker, and Alicia Spencer-Hall
                                      We invite abstract submissions for 7,500-word essays to be included in an edited volume on the topic of Disability and the Medieval Cults of Saints. Because saints’ cults in the Middle Ages centralized the body—those of the saints themselves, those of devotees, and the idea of the body on earth and in the afterlife—scholars of medieval disability frequently find that our best sources are those that also deal with saints and sanctity. This volume therefore seeks to foster and assemble a wide range of approaches to disability in the context of medieval saints’ cults. We seek contributions spanning a variety of fields, including history, literature, art history, archaeology, material culture, histories of science and medicine, religious history, etc. We especially encourage contributions that extend beyond Roman Christianity (including non-Christian concepts of sanctity) and that extend beyond Europe/the West.
                                      For the purposes of this volume, we define “disability” as broadly including physical impairment, diversity of bodily forms, chronic illness, neurodiversity (mental illness, cognitive impairment, etc), sensory impairment, and any other variation in bodily form or ability that affected medieval individuals’ role and treatment in their communities. We are open to topics spanning the medieval period both temporally and geographically, but also inclusive of late antiquity and the early modern era. The editors envision essays falling into three units: saints with disabilities; saints interacting with disability; and theorizing sanctity/disability.
                                      We welcome proposals on topics including, but not limited to:
                                      · Phenomenology of saints’ cults with respect to disability, e.g. pilgrimage, feast days, liturgy, etc;
                                      · Materiality of sanctity involved in reliquaries, shrines, and relics;
                                      · Doctrinal approaches to disability in relation to sanctity and holiness;
                                      · Sanctity and bodies in the archaeological record;
                                      · Intersections of disability and race/gender/sexuality/etc in hagiography, art, and material culture;
                                      · Healing miracles and disabling miraculous punishments;
                                      · Cross-cultural approaches to sanctity and disability;
                                      · Saints who wrote about disability;
                                      · Specific saints with connections to concepts of disability, e.g. Margaret of Antioch, Cosmas and Damian, Francis of Assisi, Dymphna, etc;
                                      · Theorizing sanctity in relation to disability; and
                                      · Saintly figures in non-hagiographic genres.
                                      Timeline
                                      Oct. 1, 2018 Proposals due
                                      Oct. 31, 2018 Replies sent to proposals
                                      Nov. 30, 2018 Volume proposal submitted to press (contributors will provide short abstracts and bios)
                                      May 31, 2019 Essays due from contributors
                                      Aug. 30, 2019 Editors deliver extensive feedback to contributors
                                      Jan. 15, 2020 Revised essays due from contributors
                                      April 3, 2020 Full volume manuscript delivered to press
                                      Please submit abstracts of 300–400 words, along with a short author bio and a description of any images you anticipate wanting to include in your essay, to the editors at DisabilitySanctity@gmail.com by Monday, October 1, 2018.