Archives par mot-clé : impairment

New book – Trauma in Medieval Society – by Wendy J. Turner and Christina Lee

Trauma in Medieval Society

Series: Explorations in Medieval Culture, Volume: 7

 

 

Submary from the editor website:

Trauma in Medieval Society is an edited collection of articles from a variety of scholars on the history of trauma and the traumatised in medieval Europe. Looking at trauma as a theoretical concept, as part of the literary and historical lives of medieval individuals and communities, this volume brings together scholars from the fields of archaeology, anthropology, history, literature, religion, and languages. The collection offers insights into the physical impairments from and psychological responses to injury, shock, war, or other violence—either corporeal or mental. From biographical to socio-cultural analyses, these articles examine skeletal and archival evidence as well as literary substantiation of trauma as lived experience in the Middle Ages.

Contributors are Carla L. Burrell, Sara M. Canavan, Susan L. Einbinder, Michael M. Emery, Bianca Frohne, Ronald J. Ganze, Helen Hickey, Sonja Kerth, Jenni Kuuliala, Christina Lee, Kate McGrath, Charles-Louis Morand Métivier, James C. Ohman, Walton O. Schalick, III, Sally Shockro, Patricia Skinner, Donna Trembinski, Wendy J. Turner, Belle S. Tuten, Anne Van Arsdall, and Marit van Cant.

More info on the editor website.

New book – Prosthesis in Medieval and Early Modern Culture – Edited by Chloe Porter, Katie L. Walter, Margaret Healy

Prosthesis in Medieval and Early Modern Culture

Edited by Chloe Porter, Katie L. Walter, Margaret Healy

2018 Routledge

Description by the editor :

« ‘Prosthesis’ denotes a rhetorical ‘addition’ to a pre-existing ‘beginning’, a ‘replacement’ for that which is ‘defective or absent’, a technological mode of ‘correction’ that reveals a history of corporeal and psychic discontent. Recent scholarship has given weight to these multiple meanings of ‘prosthesis’ as tools of analysis for literary and cultural criticism. The study of pre-modern prosthesis, however, often registers as an absence in contemporary critical discourse.

This collection seeks to redress this omission, reconsidering the history of prosthesis and its implications for contemporary critical responses to, and uses of, it. The book demonstrates the significance of notions of prosthesis in medieval and early modern theological debate, Reformation controversy, and medical discourse and practice. It also tracks its importance for imaginings of community and of the relationship of self and other, as performed on the stage, expressed in poetry, charms, exemplary and devotional literature, and as fought over in the documents of religious and cultural change. Interdisciplinary in nature, the book engages with contemporary critical and cultural theory and philosophy, genre theory, literary history, disability studies, and medical humanities, establishing prosthesis as a richly productive analytical tool in the pre-modern, as well as the modern, context. This book was originally published as a special issue of the Textual Practice journal. »

More infos on the editor website !

New publication – Book – Viewing Disability in Medieval Spanish Texts by Connie L. Scarborough.

Viewing Disability in Medieval Spanish Texts

by Connie L. Scarborough.

Amsterdam University Press,

Series: Premodern Health, Disease, and Disability

Description by the editor :

« This book is one of the first to examine medieval Spanish canonical works for their portrayals of disability in relationship to theological teachings, legal precepts, and medical knowledge. Connie L. Scarborough shows that physical impairments were seen differently through each lens. Theology at times taught that the disabled were « marked by God, » their sins rendered on their bodies; at other times, they were viewed as important objects of Christian charity. The disabled often suffered legal restrictions, allowing them to be viewed with other distinctive groups, such as the ill or the poor. And from a medical point of view, a miraculous cure could be seen as evidence of divine intervention. This book explores all these perspectives through medieval Spain’s miracle narratives, hagiographies, didactic tales, and epic poetry.  »

More infos on the editor website.

CFP – ‘Objects, Extensions, Prosthetics: The Body and Subjectivity in the Pre-Modern Period’ – 28th Feb 2018 – Newcastle University.

Objects, Extensions, Prosthetics: The Body and Subjectivity in the Pre-Modern Period

Wednesday 28th February 2018, 1-6pm Newcastle University.

We invite postgraduates and early career researchers based in the North to give short (15 minute) talks at an afternoon seminar event on Wednesday 28th February 2018. This event will include a key note from Professor Helen Smith (University of York) in response to the talks given and a group discussion of the topics to close, as well as a free lunch included. The seminar will focus on how objects function as extensions of the self the medieval and early modern period. Can objects be sites of emotional or literary expression? Do they reflect pre-modern notions vi interior/exterior selves? Can they be considered as Metonymic’ substitutions for the self? We invite PGRs/ECRs to present on this theme a, well as partake in group discussions over the course of the afternoon. Topics might include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • The body (skin, hair)
  • Fashion (clothing, textiles)
  • Prosthetics
  • Books (print., literary or personal, notebooks)
  • Stage props (/object and costumes)
  • Household items
  • Religious/sacred objects

If you would like to get involved with this seminar event and give a short paper, please send an expression of interest along with topic details (no more than 200 words) no later than 15thJanuary 2018. and/or any queries. to Emily Rowe – e.c.rowe2@newcastle.ac.uk

Meeting – Neuro-handwriting analysis: Where the Medieval and the 21st Century Collide by The Trinity Long Room Hub, Arts and Humanities Research Institute – 18th january

Description

Presenters: Dr Deborah Thorpe (TCD), Professor Stephen Smith (University of York, UK), Dr Márjory Da Costa-Abreu (DIMAp/UFRN, Brazil)

Bios:
Dr Deborah Thorpe is a Trinity Long Room Hub Marie Skłodowska-Curie Cofund Fellow. Trained as a palaeographer and a medical historian, she uses a combination of historical handwriting analysis and neurological insight to analyse the impact of ageing and age-related medical disorders on medieval script.

Professor Stephen Smith is a professor in the Department of Electronic Engineering at the University of York. His research is centred on developing evolutionary algorithms, a form of artificial intelligence, and applying them to the diagnosis and monitoring of neurological conditions such as Parkinson’s through the analysis of patients’ movements. Stephen is also co-founder and director of ClearSky Medical Diagnostics Ltd., a university spin-out company set up with the assistance of the Royal Academy of Engineering that markets clinically validated medical devices, developed from his research. Stephen is a Chartered Engineer and a Fellow of the British Computer Society.

Dr. Márjory Da Costa-Abreu is a lecturer in Artificial Intelligence at DIMAp/UFRN. She has a PhD in Electronic Engineering from the University of Kent (UK) and a MSc in Computer Science from UFRN (BR). She has experience in Biometrics analysis and identity prediction, forensics, the effects of ageing in biometrics and soft-biometric prediction techniques.

More info on Evenbrite website.

CFP – Canadian Society for the History of Medicine (CSHM) 2018 / Société canadienne d’histoire de la médecine 2018 – May 26-28, University of Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

Call for Papers: Canadian Society for the History of Medicine (CSHM) 2018

Call for Papers Canadian Society for the History of Medicine (CSHM) 2018 – Deadline 8 December 2017
May 26-28, University of Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

The CSHM will hold its annual meeting and conference on May 26-28 at the University of Regina, in conjunction with the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences. The Programme Committee calls for papers that address the theme of this year’s Congress: “Gathering Diversities.”

Scholars are invited to give papers related to diversity in the history of medicine, health and healing; or that address historical experiences of patient diversity and equity (gender, race, sexuality, ability). Proposals on topics unrelated to the Congress theme are also welcome.

Please submit an abstract and one-page CV for consideration by 20 November 2017 by e-mail to Esyllt Jones, esyllt.jones@umanitoba.ca. Abstracts must not exceed 350 words. We encourage proposals for organised panels of three (3) related papers; in this case, please submit a panel proposal of less than 350 words in addition to an abstract and one-page CV from each presenter. The Committee will notify applicants of its decision by December 15, 2017. Those who accept an invitation to present at the meeting agree to provide French and English versions of the accepted abstract for inclusion in the bilingual Program Book.


Appel de présentations, Société canadienne d’histoire de la médecine (SCHM) 2018 –APPEL A CONTRIBUTION JUSQU’AU 8 DÉCEMBRE
Le 26-28 mai, Université de Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

La SCHM tiendra son congrès annuel le 26-28 mai à l’Université de Regina, dans le cadre du Congrès des sciences humaines. Le comité du programme fait un appel de présentations sur le thème du congrès cette année : « Rassembler les diversités ».

Les chercheurs sont invités à offrir une présentation se rapportant à la diversité dans l’histoire de la médecine, de la santé et de la guérison, ou qui considère des exemples historiques de diversité et d’équité chez les patients (sexe, race, sexualité, capacité). Les présentations sur des thèmes sans rapport avec le thème du Congrès sont également les bienvenues.

Veuillez envoyer un résumé et un CV d’une page pour examen avant le 20 novembre 2017 par courriel à Esyllt Jones, esyllt.jones@umanitoba.ca. Les résumés ne doivent pas dépasser 350 mots. Nous encourageons les propositions de présentations en groupes de trois (3) documents connexes; pour ces cas, veuillez soumettre une proposition de table ronde de moins de 350 mots en plus d’un résumé et d’un CV d’une page pour chaque présentateur. Le Comité avisera les demandeurs de sa décision d’ici le 15 décembre 2017. Ceux qui acceptent l’invitation à présenter au congrès s’engagent à fournir des versions française et anglaise du résumé qu’ils ont soumis pour l’inclusion dans le programme bilingue du congrès.

Plus d’info sur le site des organisateurs.

CFP – Histories of Disability: local, global and colonial stories – 7-8 June 2018, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK.

Histories of Disability: local, global and colonial stories

7-8 June 2018, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK.

Back in 2001, the historian of American deafness Douglas Baynton argued that ‘Disability is everywhere in history, once you begin looking for it, but conspicuously absent in the histories we write’ (Baynton, 2001, p. 52). Since then the history of disability has burgeoned with many important studies showing this not only to be a significant field but a vibrant one. But several key areas remain to be thoroughly interrogated. The historiography remains largely limited to America and western Europe, historians have been slow to take up the exciting postcolonial questions explored by literary scholars and sociologists about the relationship between colonialism and disability, and a tendency has remained to treat the western experience of disability as a universal one. This workshop aims to interrogate these biases, shed light on geographical specificity of disability and think more about the global history of disability both empirically and theoretically.

Questions of interest might include, but are not limited to

· How is the experience and construction of disability specific to time and place?

· What is the relationship between the local and the global when considering the history of disability?

· How does disability intersect with other identities (such as race, gender, class and religion)?

· What is the relationship between disability and imperialism/colonialism?

· How can postcolonial theory help us better historicise the experience of disability?

· Does the concept of ‘disability’ itself work outside a western context?

· How are the histories of disability shaped by mobility, movement and travel?

Abstracts of c. 300 words should be sent to Esme Cleall, e.r.cleall@sheffield.ac.uk by 1st December 2017. I’d also be happy to answer any questions.

Contact Info:
Esme Cleall, University of Sheffield, e.r.cleall@sheffield.ac.uk
Contact Email:
e.r.cleall@sheffield.ac.uk

Call for papers – Violence and the Mind – Fifteenth annual McGill-queens graduate conference in history – McGill University in Montréal – 1-3 March 2018

CALL FOR PAPERS – Violence and the Mind

Fifteenth annual McGill-queens graduate conference in history, to be held at McGill University in Montréal, Québec, Canada, 1-3 March 2018

The foundational role played by violence in forging and re-shaping human society can be readily discerned within the study of slavery, colonialism, gender & sexuality, economics, revolution and military history. Indeed, questions regarding violence, whether they be immediate or latent, manifest across the many subfields of historical inquiry. And yet, to think about violence historically is a daunting task, requiring study across an immense spectrum of geographic and temporal horizons. Scholars who make such an attempt often find themselves further challenged in defining the conceptual parameters of violence itself. Studies of epochal and generational violence often turn to the question of embodiment, while studies of trauma or structural violence may choose to leave the body behind entirely. The theme of the 2018 McGill-Queen’s Graduate Conference in History, « Violence and the Mind », provides a platform for graduate students to situate these problems as they continue to explore violence historically by foregrounding the interior lives of historical subjects. We welcome emerging scholars from across the disciplines to present research that questions how violence is produced, elaborated, interpreted and experienced by the mind. We encourage proposals that present historiographical, theoretical, and comparative approaches to such forms of violence across a variety of regions and time periods. Hopeful participants should propose 15-20 minute presentations that speak to the following questions and themes: How are the interior lives of human beings shaped, historically, by violence? What distinguishes violence committed against bodies from violence committed against mi.? How can historians study the relationship between violence and subjective experience? Who is distinct (and what is similar) about violence produced or directed towards the mental realm? To what extent can the various subfields of history, which explicitly study violence, be approached together when inner experiences are taken as the point of departure? How can the notion of structural violence contend with individual psychologies?
Potential areas of enquiry may include (but are not limited to):

• The history of ideology.

• The history of psychoanalysis

• The history of medicine, including psychology and psychiatry.

• Colonialism

• Slavery

• Racism and Critical Race Theory

• Military history, including trauma

• Queer theory and the history of sexuality and gender

• Philosophy of Mind

• Disability Studies

• History of emotions

• Indigenous studies, reconciliation and settler colonialism.

Please submit an abstract of no more than 400 words as well as a brief academic biography in Word or PDF format to mcgillqueens2018@gmail.com by 8 december 2017.

CFP – The Old and the Young: Medieval Bodies Ignored – ICMS Kalamazoo 2018

The Old and the Young:
Medieval Bodies Ignored

Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Sponsored Sessions at Kalamazoo, May 1043 2018

These sessions will concentrate upon the experiences and bodies of the old and the young, Recognising that the medieval normative body (male,
middle aged and white) has influenced the way we look at the MA, the intention of these sessions is to highlight the experiences of children and the elderly which are outside the boundaries of said norm. Furthermore, we wish to gain a greater understanding of how other factors (gender, race, ability, wealth, bodily status, power) intersect with and impact upon the experiences of elderly and young people. While medieval childhood studies is by no means a neglected field, historiography has recently turned away from a ‘panhistorical and essentialist’ child-centric model. This allows us to examine the experiences of a child within culturally specific contexts in which it might be neglected, abandoned or dismissed. Meanwhile, the old are often marginalised in scholarship, within the medieval discourse and in our lived reality. The hope is that by examining their experiences in concert with one another, we will be able to build up a clearer understanding of the lived experience of the old and the young in the Middle Ages.

Intersectional, interdisciplinary abstracts would be particularly welcomed.
Possible Topics Include:
‘ Specific historical experiences of being young and old
‘ Body as physical entity and as a site of rhetoric
‘ Dual nature of body: site of discourse and identity
‘ Descriptions of old and young bodies

Please submit a 250-word proposal for a 15- to 20-minute paper as well as a Participant Information Form to medievalbodiesignored@gmail.com by September 15, 2017.