CFP: ‘More Fuss about the Body’ Volume – deadline February 1!

Call for Proposals for an Edited Volume:

More Fuss about the Body:
New Medievalists’ Perspectives

Editors: Leah Pope Parker and Stephanie Grace-Petinos

In her 1995 essay “Why All the Fuss about the Body?: A Medievalist’s Perspective,” Caroline Walker Bynum presented a nuanced picture of embodiment in the past in order “to suggest that we in the present would do well to focus on a wider range of topics in our study of body or bodies.”* The same year saw the release of Bynum’s magisterial exploration of the body, identity, and medieval Christian eschatology in The Resurrection of the Body in Western Christianity, 200–1336. Almost 25 years later, Bynum’s call for diversity with respect to histories of the body still inspires increasingly nuanced approaches to medieval embodiment.

 London, British Library, “Harley Psalter” Harley MS 603, fol. 6v

London, British Library, “Harley Psalter” Harley MS 603, fol. 6v

We invite proposals for short essays of approximately 5,000 words for a volume of original research that seeks to revisit, expand, and update the ideas presented in Bynum’s seminal essay, while using it as a springboard for future investigations concerning the body, both medieval and modern. We seek essays that deal with personhood, identity, and the material body, updating histories of the body through areas of study that have grown in popularity since the mid-1990s, including disability studies, trans studies, queer theory, postcolonial studies, posthumanism, ecocriticism, animal studies, and the global Middle Ages, along with new developments in feminist and critical race theory. Possible essay topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Bodily integrity and the limits of the body, healing damage to the body, or bodies and borders (i.e. the treatment of bodies in immigration/incarceration);
  • Theologies of death and resurrection and rituals of burial and remembrance;
  • Bodies centered and marginalized—including discussion of recent movements such as #metoo and Black Lives Matter;
  • Gender expression and/through the body;
  • Normativity (cisheteronormativity, compulsory ablebodiedness, etc);
  • Flora and fauna, cyborgs and prosthesis;
  • Present-day concepts of embodiment and their medieval predecessors as presented in popular culture;
  • Comparative and cross-cultural concepts of the body; and/or
  • The body in queer/crip time.

The organizers of this panel are committed to including perspectives representative of the diversity of the field, and especially welcome proposals from “new” medievalists, that is in broad terms, those who have joined the field since 1995. In the spirit of Bynum’s invitation to consider “a wider range of topics in our study of body or bodies,” we welcome papers that offer critical reflections upon the field of medieval studies, and which represent diverse and innovative perspectives on medieval histories of the body and contemporary medievalisms.

Please send abstracts, accompanied by an author bio of no more than 200 words, to leahpopeparker@gmail.com by February 1, 2019.

NB: In order to achieve an accelerated production timeline, essay drafts will be due to the editors in fall 2019.


*Caroline Walker Bynum, “Why All the Fuss About the Body? A Medievalist’s Perspective,” Critical Inquiry 22 (1995): 1–33, p. 8.

More infos on the editor website

Permeable bodies 05 – 06 October 2018 – University college london

Permeable bodies – 05/06 October 2018 – University college london

In recent years, the human body has gained a prominent position in discussions of medieval and early modern cultures. The troublesome contingency of the human body encompassed critical boundaries between inside and outside, and became a central concern in religious, political, and economical developments. Medieval bodies were permeable microcosms, not only sites containment but also of revelatory experiences. In the early modern period, body and identity were indistinct, interdependent categories, inseparable from the natural and cultural space that they inhabited. This logic of perpetual fluidity both generated a disquieting sense of impending doom, but also allowed for the propagation of multiple possibilities of understanding, which materialised into a rich visual and material culture.

We are delighted to invite all those interested in medieval and early modern studies to a 2-day conference on Friday 5 and Saturday 6 October 2018 at University College London. This event will explore medieval and early modern notions of the changing body, as well as changing notions of the body. Images and ideas of permeable bodies will serve as an inclusive platform of inquiry into bodies of different race, gender, sex, and ability.

We welcome 20 minutes talks from scholars of any career stage. We are particularly interested in incisive and provoking perspectives on bodies traditionally relegated to the margins, in conjunction with gender and disability studies. We seek critical and original responses on the theme of corporeal permeability across not only disciplines, but also chronological and geographical boundaries.

The conference includes a workshop at the Wellcome Library, where selected images from the archives will be displayed in a private study room.

Keynote speaker: Dr. Jack Hartnell (University of East Anglia)

Please send a short abstract (200-300 words) and a biography (100 words) by Monday 23 July to Laura Scalabrella Spada and Lauren Rozenberg at permeablebodies@gmail.com. We will notify applicants by Monday 6 August.

Bursaries available on application. Please visit permeablebodies.wordpress.com for more details on how to apply, updates, and additional information.

 

More infos on the organistor’s website

CFP – Skin in Medieval and Early Modern Worlds – Perth Medieval and Renaissance Group/UWA Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies Annual Conference

Skin in Medieval and Early Modern Worlds

Perth Medieval and Renaissance Group/UWA Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies Annual Conference

13 October 2018

From the organisators website :

Keynote Speaker: Dr Lisa Beaven (La Trobe University), ‘Living Flesh: Splendor, Sex and Sickness on the Surface of the Skin’.

Skin as a material served a vital role in premodern economies. It was an essential ingredient in clothing and tools, and it formed the primary material for the manuscripts on which knowledge and ideas were recorded and preserved. Beyond the many uses for the skins of animals, the idea of skin interested artists, scholars, and theologians. As a boundary or surface, skin presented a range of symbolic possibilities. Images of skin, such as its piercing, often acted as metaphors for the uncovering of secrets or the interpretation of allegory. Premodern observers, likewise, often believed that the appearance and colour of an individual’s skin indicated truths about their inner nature. Diseases of the skin, such as leprosy, attracted legislation and intellectual speculation, drawing together the immaterial world of ideas regarding skin and the treatment of actual human skins.

We are interested in papers that address the many premodern uses of skin, as well representations of and ideas about skin. This conference is multidisciplinary and wide-ranging; we welcome papers from the fields of book culture and manuscript studies, history, material culture, medicine, disability studies, race studies, crime and punishment, art, literature, and theology.

The conference organisers invite proposals for 20-minute papers.

Please send a paper title, 250-word abstract, and a short (no more than 100-word) biography to pmrg.cmems.conference@gmail.com by 31 May 2018.

 

 

More infos on the organisators website.

New book – Prosthesis in Medieval and Early Modern Culture – Edited by Chloe Porter, Katie L. Walter, Margaret Healy

Prosthesis in Medieval and Early Modern Culture

Edited by Chloe Porter, Katie L. Walter, Margaret Healy

2018 Routledge

Description by the editor :

“‘Prosthesis’ denotes a rhetorical ‘addition’ to a pre-existing ‘beginning’, a ‘replacement’ for that which is ‘defective or absent’, a technological mode of ‘correction’ that reveals a history of corporeal and psychic discontent. Recent scholarship has given weight to these multiple meanings of ‘prosthesis’ as tools of analysis for literary and cultural criticism. The study of pre-modern prosthesis, however, often registers as an absence in contemporary critical discourse.

This collection seeks to redress this omission, reconsidering the history of prosthesis and its implications for contemporary critical responses to, and uses of, it. The book demonstrates the significance of notions of prosthesis in medieval and early modern theological debate, Reformation controversy, and medical discourse and practice. It also tracks its importance for imaginings of community and of the relationship of self and other, as performed on the stage, expressed in poetry, charms, exemplary and devotional literature, and as fought over in the documents of religious and cultural change. Interdisciplinary in nature, the book engages with contemporary critical and cultural theory and philosophy, genre theory, literary history, disability studies, and medical humanities, establishing prosthesis as a richly productive analytical tool in the pre-modern, as well as the modern, context. This book was originally published as a special issue of the Textual Practice journal.”

More infos on the editor website !

Meetings – Seminar – Birkbeck Medieval Seminar: The Productive Medieval Body, Fri 1 June 2018, Keynes Library, School of Arts, Birkbeck, 43 Gordon Square, London.

Birkbeck Medieval Seminar: The Productive Medieval Body

Fri 1 June 2018,

Keynes Library, School of Arts, Birkbeck, 43 Gordon Square, London.

 

The Birkbeck Medieval Seminar is an annual event. It is free and open to all scholars of the Middle Ages. It is designed to foster conversation and debate on a particular topic within medieval studies by providing the opportunity to hear new research from experts in the field. We are a welcoming and inclusive environment. This venue is fully accessible. Please contact Isabel Davis (i.davis@bbk.ac.uk) for further information or if you need help using the registration site.

Speakers:

Kim Phillips (Auckland);

Maaike van der Lugt (Paris – Diderot);

Vincent Gillespie (Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford)

and Alicia Spencer-Hall (UCL).

Titles to be confirmed.

Coffee and tea is provided but you will need to find or bring your own lunch.

Please note: this is a free event and, as such, if you book a ticket and later find out that you cannot attend, please do cancel your booking so that your place can be made available to someone else.

 

More infos on the Evenbrite of the event