CFP – Emotions on the Fringes: Marginalised, Monstrous, and Supernatural Emotions – Leeds 2022

While the study of emotion in literature has received major scholarly interest throughout recent years, the study of the emotional landscape of supernatural concepts and monsters, however, represents uncharted territory. This session aims to explore the emotions of marginalised communities as well as monstrous and supernatural concepts, the vocabulary of their emotions, their literary functions as well as reactions toward such entities. What emotions are marginalised communities, monsters, and supernatural concepts depicted with? Is there a certain inventory of emotions that such concepts can be said to have ‘traditionally’ been described with? How similar or divergent are these emotions to those of human figures?
 
In keeping with the IMC 2022 thematic strand ‘Borders’, this session will explore representations of emotions of supernatural and monstrous concepts as well as other marginalised communities. As this session is intended to be interdisciplinary in nature, papers from various fields and topics relating to/combining the study of emotions, among others comparative study of literature, linguistics, and history, are welcomed.
 
Topics may include but are not limited to
• Emotions and feelings of the supernatural, monstrous, and marginalised communities
• Emotional reactions towards supernatural, monstrous, and marginalised communities
• Literary emotional communities on the peripheries
• Semantic dimensions of emotion lexemes
• Comparative study of emotions, feelings, and senses
• Depiction of emotions in textual media and medieval art
 
Please send abstracts of no more than 250 words for a 20-minute paper to Dr Felix Lummer (fel2@hi.is) by September 1st, 2021.

CFP – The Body and the Text: Medical Humanities and Medieval Literature, c. 1150 – 1550 Leeds International Medieval Congress, 1-4 July 2019

The Body and the Text: Medical Humanities and Medieval Literature, c. 1150 – 1550

Leeds International Medieval Congress, 1-4 July 2019

Recent years have witnessed a surge in scholarship in the field of the Medical Humanities. In considering medicine in its cultural and social contexts, the Medical Humanities has symbolised a ‘paradigm shift away from what might be called medical reductionism to medical holism, where patients are not reduced to diseases and bodies but rather are seen as whole persons in contexts and in relations’ (Cole et al, 2015:8). In seeking to merge disciplines and foster interactive dialogues, this area of research is inherently inclusive, dynamic, and elastic. Furthermore, since the topics of science, medicine, eith physiology, religion, astrology, and magic were often discussed withinh the same medieval texts and contexts, te multidisciplinarity of the Medical Humanities is particularly apt for Medieval Studies.

We therefore seek to put together a session or sessions on Medieval Literature and the Medical Humanities. Our focus is global and will include proposals from two complementary directions: how are medicine, health and wellbeing represented in medieval and early modern literature? How may literary texts from this period contribute to training and practice in the Medical Humanities?

Proposals may include but are not confined to the following: Representations of health and sickness in literary texts;

  • Depictions of medical knowledge, practice and practitioners in literary texts;
  • Representations of the senses and / or emotions;
  • The relationship between medicine and religion in the Middle Ages;
  • Engagement with texts (reading and listening) as a therapeutic practice in the Middle Ages;
  • A consideration of how medieval literature might contribute to training and practice in the Medical Humanities;
  • Defining the Medical Humanities in a medieval context.

Abstracts of no more than 300 words should be submitted to the session organisers Dr Alison Williams (a.j.williams@swansea…uk) and It Laura Kalas Williams (I.e.williams@swansea.ac.uk) by 31 August 2018.

CFP – Law and (Dis)Order – theme on Sensory Orders: Detecting Difference in the Middle Ages at The Forty-Fourth Annual Sewanee Medieval Colloquium

Theme: Law and (Dis)Order

The Forty-Fourth Annual Sewanee Medieval Colloquium  April 13-14, 2018 – The University of the South, Sewanee, TN.

The Sewanee Medieval Colloquium invites papers exploring aspects of law, order, disorder and resistance in all aspects of medieval cultures. This includes legal codes, social order, orthodoxy and heterodoxy, poetic or artistic form, gender construction, racial divisions, scientific and philosophical order, the history of popular rebellion, and other ways of conceptualizing our theme.

Papers should be twenty minutes in length, and commentary is traditionally provided for each paper presented. We invite papers from all disciplines, and encourage contributions from medievalists working on any geographic area. A seminar will also seek contributions; please look for its separate CFP soon. Participants in the Colloquium are generally limited to holders of a Ph.D. and those currently in a Ph.D. program.

Please submit an abstract (approx. 250 words) and brief c.v., via our website (http://medievalcolloquium.sewanee.edu), no later than 26 October 2017. If you wish to propose a session, please submit abstracts and vitae for all participants in the session. Completed papers, including notes, will be due no later than 13 March 2018.

Prospective participants are invited to apply to propose complete panels of two or three papers, apply to the general call, or apply to panel sub-themes, which appear below. Papers not taken by sub-themes will be considered for the general call.

Sub-Theme:

 

Sensory Orders: Detecting Difference in the Middle Ages

Organizers: Molly Lewis, George Washington University (mclewis@email.gwu.edu); Arthur Russell, Case Western Reserve University (ajr171@case.edu)

Appeals to smell, taste, see, hear, and touch go a long way to define medieval senses of self and other. In the Middle English Siege of Jerusalem (ca. 1370-1380), for instance, the stench of Jewish corpses “choke” ditches to the horror of Jewish survivors and to the delight of Christian spectators. The sound of the blacksmith’s hammer striking an anvil, as imagined in “Complaint Against The Blacksmiths” (ca. 1275-1300), somehow transmits the color of his blackened skin and the nuisance of his socioeconomic status across great distances. What do we do with works, such as the Siege of Jerusalem and the “Complaint Against The Blacksmiths,” that negatively consume its sensing figures and, by extension, its readers? What is gained in and through these literary assaults on the senses? What are the ends of medieval sensation? How are medieval and modern readers taught to perceive differences of race, religion, gender, sexuality, and/or ability?

Sensory studies often make positive use of the senses, in so far as the senses enable modern audiences to have deeper and more significant encounters with past cultures, histories, and literatures. For all the positive sensations we recognize, medieval senses were just as often engaged in and by art and literature to inculcate difference, justify brutality, and/or cultivate sympathy. “Detecting Difference” invites participants to examine the various formations and capacities of the medieval sensorium to encode and enforce social (dis)orders, paying special attention to techniques for detecting differences of race, religion, gender, sexuality, and/or ability. The panel will build on recent work in the sensory, disability, and race studies—from Mark Smith’s How Race Was Made: Slavery, Segregation, and the Senses (2006) to the special issue of postmedieval, edited by Lara Farina and Holly Dugan on “The Intimate Senses” (2012)—to explore how medieval perceptions of difference speak to present-day conversations about difference, about cultures of surveillance, about the policing of bodies, behaviors, and ideas.

Comment: Lara Farina, West Virginia University

 

More infos on the organisator’s website !

Call for papers – Violence and the Mind – Fifteenth annual McGill-queens graduate conference in history – McGill University in Montréal – 1-3 March 2018

CALL FOR PAPERS – Violence and the Mind

Fifteenth annual McGill-queens graduate conference in history, to be held at McGill University in Montréal, Québec, Canada, 1-3 March 2018

The foundational role played by violence in forging and re-shaping human society can be readily discerned within the study of slavery, colonialism, gender & sexuality, economics, revolution and military history. Indeed, questions regarding violence, whether they be immediate or latent, manifest across the many subfields of historical inquiry. And yet, to think about violence historically is a daunting task, requiring study across an immense spectrum of geographic and temporal horizons. Scholars who make such an attempt often find themselves further challenged in defining the conceptual parameters of violence itself. Studies of epochal and generational violence often turn to the question of embodiment, while studies of trauma or structural violence may choose to leave the body behind entirely. The theme of the 2018 McGill-Queen’s Graduate Conference in History, « Violence and the Mind », provides a platform for graduate students to situate these problems as they continue to explore violence historically by foregrounding the interior lives of historical subjects. We welcome emerging scholars from across the disciplines to present research that questions how violence is produced, elaborated, interpreted and experienced by the mind. We encourage proposals that present historiographical, theoretical, and comparative approaches to such forms of violence across a variety of regions and time periods. Hopeful participants should propose 15-20 minute presentations that speak to the following questions and themes: How are the interior lives of human beings shaped, historically, by violence? What distinguishes violence committed against bodies from violence committed against mi.? How can historians study the relationship between violence and subjective experience? Who is distinct (and what is similar) about violence produced or directed towards the mental realm? To what extent can the various subfields of history, which explicitly study violence, be approached together when inner experiences are taken as the point of departure? How can the notion of structural violence contend with individual psychologies?
Potential areas of enquiry may include (but are not limited to):

• The history of ideology.

• The history of psychoanalysis

• The history of medicine, including psychology and psychiatry.

• Colonialism

• Slavery

• Racism and Critical Race Theory

• Military history, including trauma

• Queer theory and the history of sexuality and gender

• Philosophy of Mind

• Disability Studies

• History of emotions

• Indigenous studies, reconciliation and settler colonialism.

Please submit an abstract of no more than 400 words as well as a brief academic biography in Word or PDF format to mcgillqueens2018@gmail.com by 8 december 2017.

History of Pre-Modern Medicine seminar series, 2017–18 – Wellcome Library

The 2017–18 series – organised by a group of historians of medicine based at London universities and hosted by the Wellcome Library – will commence with four seminars in the autumn term.

The series will be focused on pre-modern medicine, which we take to cover European and extra-European history before the 20th century (antiquity, medieval and early modern history, some elements of 19th-century medicine). The seminars are open to all.

Tuesday 10 October 2017 – Dr Elma Brenner (Wellcome Collection), ‘Leprosy and diet in medieval Normandy’

Tuesday 24 October 2017 – Dr Benedetta Lomi (University of Bristol), ‘The uses of ox-bezoar in pre-modern Japan in ritual and medical practices’

Tuesday 7 November 2017 – Dr Michael Brown (University of Roehampton), ‘Anxiety and compassion: emotions and the surgical encounter in early 19th-century Britain’

Tuesday 21 November 2017 – Professor Roberta Gilchrist (University of Reading), ‘The archaeology of monastic healing: spirit, mind and body’

All seminars will take place in the Wellcome Library, 183 Euston Road, London NW1 2BE. Doors at 6pm prompt, seminars will start at 6.15pm.

The programme for January–March 2018 will follow in the new year.

Organising Committee: Elma Brenner (Wellcome Collection), Michael Brown (Roehampton), Elena Carrera (QMUL), Sandra Cavallo (RHUL), John Henderson (Birkbeck, London), William MacLehose (UCL), Anna Maerker (KCL), Patrick Wallis (LSE), Ronit Yoeli-Tlalim (Goldsmiths).

Enquiries to Ross MacFarlane (R.MacFarlane@wellcome.ac.uk).

 

Link to the Wellcome Library website.