CFP – In Sickness and in Health: Pestilence, Disease, and Healing in Medieval and Early Modern Art – 14th Annual Imago Conference, University of Haifa, January 12, 2021

In light of the global turmoil caused by the COVID-19 epidemic, the 14th Annual Imago conference will examine the cultural and artistic impact of epidemics, diseases, and healing in the art of the Middle Ages and the Early Modern Period. We hope this examination will not only shed new light on the artistic, social, and political mechanisms of both of these periods, but will also produce fresh insights into cultural and artistic responses to the current global health crisis.

Disease is an inevitable part of the human experience. Whether in times of acute crisis, the most familiar of which is the Black Death of the mid-14th century, or as a constant threat at all other times, diseases evoked varied responses, from theological formulations to the transmission of medicinal knowledge; and, not least, to artistic depictions.

We invite papers from broad and diverse points of view: case studies of iconographies dealing with disease or healing, studies of the artistic responses to specific epidemics, and comparative studies between East and West, the Christian and the Islamic worlds, etc. Interdisciplinary studies and those engaging with the production, reception, and interpretation of art concerned with disease and healing are of particular interest. Suggested topics may include, but are not limited to:

· Artistic expressions of medicinal practices

· Visual components in medical manuscripts

· Artistic responses to the Black Death and to other epidemics

· Physical and spiritual health – Medieval and Early Modern expressions

· Disease and otherness – xenophobic, racist, and anti-Semitic polemical visual expressions

· Disease – theological and moral conceptions

· Gendered aspects of disease and healing

· Disease and healing between East and West – artistic expressions

· Leprosy and its cultural and artistic representations

· Saints, relics, pilgrimage, and healing

· Disease and apotropaic practices

· Places of sickness and death: art in hospitals and cemeteries

· Images of doctors and nurses

· Representations of suffering and sickness

The conference will take place on January 12, 2021, at the University of Haifa.

* Should the ongoing Covid-19 situation prevent the conference from being held on campus, it will be held online via Zoom.

* All speakers will be allowed to deliver their paper via Zoom, even if the conference will take place physically on campus.

*We will broadcast the entire conference to participants via Zoom.

Abstracts of no more than 250 words should be sent to Dr. Gil Fishhof (gfishhof@staff.haifa.ac.il) no later than September 1st,2020. Abstracts should include the applicant’s name, professional affiliation, and a short CV. Each paper should be limited to a 20-minute presentation, to be followed by a discussion and questions. All applicants will be notified by October 1st 2020 regarding acceptance of their proposal. For additional information or further inquiries, please contact Dr. Fishhof.

Organizing committee: Dr. Gil Fishhof, Ms. Mazi Kuzi, Prof. Jochai Rosen, Dr. Margo Stroumsa-Uzan.

Draft program conference – Reconsidering Illness and Recovery in the Early Modern World Online Conference 2020 – An interdisciplinary virtual conference for the history of health, medicine and disease – org. by Rachel Clamp and Claire Turner – 18 and 19 August 2020

RECONSIDERING ILLNESS AND RECOVERY IN THE EARLY MODERN WORLD 

Funded by the Durham University Centre for Academic Development

Sponsored by Oxford University Press and Yale University Press

 

With many conferences being cancelled or postponed due to COVID-19, Rachel Clamp (Durham University) and Claire Turner (University of Leeds) have decided to hold an online interdisciplinary conference. Their aim is to provide a space for scholars at all stages of their careers to discuss and share their work with the wider academic community.

The virtual conference will bring together an interdisciplinary group of researchers to reconsider the role of health, illness, and recovery in the early modern world in light of the current crisis. These topics sit at the intersection of some of the most significant themes in early modern history and are particularly relevant today. The ways in which contemporaries interpreted, represented, monitored, controlled and ultimately recovered from illness have broad implications for the study of science, medicine, religion, art, literature and so much more.

DAY 1
Tuesday, 18th August 1-4pm (BST)


PANEL ONE: EPIDEMIC AND INFECTIOUS DISEASE 1PM – 2PM
Aaron Columbus, Birkbeck, University of London
‘For the better observing of order during this tyme of the contagious infection’: The response of parish government to plague in the suburban environs of London c.1600 – 1650
Marina Iní, University of Cambridge
Quarantine and plague prevention: lazzaretti in the early modern Mediterranean Lorna Lorna Giltrow-Shaw, University of Birmingham
‘Death…dogs them into their own houses’: The pestilential pooch in the col aborative play The Witch of Edmonton


PANEL TWO: MEDICAL ENCOUNTERS AND INTERVENTIONS 2PM – 3PM
Nat Cutter, University of Melbourne
The First Misery of Barbary: Plague, Medicine, Recovery and Death for British Expatriates in the Ottoman Maghreb, 1660 – 1710
Maggie Bell, Assistant Curator, Norton Simon Museum
Looking Exercises: Salutary Effects of Images in the Central Ward of Santa Maria del a Helen Esfandiary, King’s College London
Managing Smal pox: Elite Georgian Mothers and the Making of an English Method of Innoculation

KEYNOTE PRESENTATION 3PM – 4PM
Professor John Henderson, Birkbeck, University of London
Imagining the Great Pox in Renaissance Italy: Patients, symptoms and treatment

 

DAY 2
Wednesday, 19th August 1-3pm (BST)


PANEL THREE: IDEALS OF HEALTH AND RECOVERY 1PM – 2PM
Emma Marshall, University of York
People, Place and Power: Re-Evaluating Domestic Healthcare
Dr Ninon Dubourg, University of Paris
Disabling Consequences of Il nesses on Clerics’ Recruitment in 1459: (Re-)Inclusion of Disabled People within the Church by Pius I
Amie Bolissian Mcrae, University of Reading
‘A conservative cure in respect of Age’: The Contingent Nature of Recovery for Early Modern Ageing Patients’


KEYNOTE PRESENTATION 2PM – 3PM
Dr Hannah Newton, University of Reading
Inside the Sick Chamber: The History of Il ness in Six Objects To register to attend the conference send an email to illnessandrecovery@gmail.com by Monday 16 August or visit our website https://illnessandrecoveryconference.wordpress.com

Clik here for more information

New Book – Sara Ritchey, Sharon Strocchia (eds), Gender, Health, and Healing, 1250-1550 – Amsterdam University Press

Sara Ritchey, Sharon Strocchia (eds), Gender, Health, and Healing, 1250-1550

This path-breaking collection offers an integrative model for understanding health and healing in Europe and the Mediterranean from 1250 to 1550. By foregrounding gender as an organizing principle of healthcare, the contributors challenge traditional binaries that ahistorically separate care from cure, medicine from religion, and domestic healing from fee-for-service medical exchanges. The essays collected here illuminate previously hidden and undervalued forms of healthcare and varieties of body knowledge produced and transmitted outside the traditional settings of university, guild, and academy. They draw on non-traditional sources — vernacular regimens, oral communications, religious and legal sources, images and objects — to reveal additional locations for producing body knowledge in households, religious communities, hospices, and public markets. Emphasizing cross-confessional and multilinguistic exchange, the essays also reveal the multiple pathways for knowledge transfer in these centuries. Gender, Health, and Healing, 1250-1550 provides a synoptic view of how gender and cross-cultural exchange shaped medical theory and practice in later medieval and Renaissance societies.

Introduction – Gendering Medieval Health and Healing: New Sources, New Perspectives
Sara Ritchey and Sharon Strocchia
 
PART 1: Sources of Religious Healing
 
Caring by the Hours: The Psalter as a Gendered Health care Technology
Sara Ritchey
 
Female Saints as Agents of Female Healing: Gendered Practices and Patronage in the Cult of St. Cunigunde
Iliana Kandzha
 
PART 2: Producing and Transmitting Medical Knowledge
 
Blood, Milk and Breastbleeding: The Humoral Economy of Women’s Bodies in Late Medieval Medicine
Montserrat Cabré and Fernando Salmón
 
Care of the Breast in the Late Middle Ages: The Tractatus de Passionibus Mamillarum
Belle S. Tuten
 
Household Medicine for a Renaissance Court: Caterina Sforza’s Ricettario Reconsidered
Sheila Barker and Sharon Strocchia
 
Understanding/Controlling the Female Body in Ten Recipes: Print and the Dissemination of Medical Knowledge about Women in the Early Sixteenth Century
Julia Gruman Martins
 
PART 3: Infirmity and Care
 
Ubi non est mulier, ingemiscit egens? Gendered Perceptions of Care from the Thirteenth to Sixteenth Centuries
Eva-Maria Cersovsky
 
Domestic Care in the Sixteenth Century: Expectations, Experiences, and Practices from a Gendered Perspective
Cordula Nolte
 
Bathtubs as a Healing Approach in Fifteenth-Century Ottoman Medicine
Ayman Yasin Atat
 
PART 4: (In)fertility and Reproduction
 
Gender, Old Age, and the Infertile Body in Medieval Medicine
Catherine Rider
 
Gender Segregation and the Possibility of Arabo-Galenic Gynecological Practice in the Medieval Islamic World
Sara Verskin
 
Afterword: Healing Women and Women Healers
Naama Cohen-Hanegbi

Conference – Monash Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies Sixth Annual Symposium – Salutaria! Perspectives on Health and Wellbeing in Medieval and Early Modern History – Friday 24th April 2020

Salutaria! Perspectives on Health and Wellbeing in Medieval and Early Modern History

 

The preservation of health and the pursuit of wellness were major preoccupations during the Medieval and Renaissance period. This was not limited to just the body but also to the mind, the soul, the community and the environment. As a complex subject that affected everybody, the quest for wellbeing was understood and experienced in a multitude of ways. This symposium aims to explore both the changing and continuing perceptions of wellbeing during the medieval and early modern period as well as the various strategies people employed to pursue it for themselves and for others.

Time: 9:00 am to 5:00 pm

Date: Friday 24th April 2020

Location: Monash Club, 32 Exhibition Walk, Monash University, Clayton Campus

 

Keynote Speaker

Professor Guy Geltner (Monash University)
“Health and the Environment Beyond the Simplex of the Pre”

Speakers

Dr Michael Barbezat (The Institute for Religion and Critical Inquiry, Australian Catholic University)

Elizabeth Burrell (Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, Monash University)

Dr Merav Carmeli (Australian Centre for Jewish Civilisation, Monash University)

Nat Cutter (School of Historical and Philosophical Studies, University of Melbourne)

Jacqueline Mahoney (School of Philosophical, Historical and International Studies, Monash University)

Dr Melissa Raine (School of Historical and Philosophical Studies, University of Melbourne)

Dr Kathryn Smithies (School of Historical and Philosophical Studies, University of Melbourne)

Dr Richard Tait (Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, Monash University)

Gordon Whyte (Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University)

 

More info on the Monash website.

CFP – « Technologies of Disability, Material Histories of the Premodern Body », at Wellcome Collection & the Warburg Institute – 02-03 June, 2020.

Born within a decade of each other, pioneering art historian Aby Worburg and pharmaceutical entrepreneur Sir Henry Wellcome had bold visions for the material and visual study of culture and science. While Warburg was exploring alternatives to stylistic accounts of art through his « laboratory » of a growing library and photo archive inclusive of histories of science, Wellcome was amassing one of the most diverse collections devoted to the history of health. Today, their research communities continue to care for those legacies with a critical eye to their conceptual premises and contested histories.

This two day workshop juxtaposes Worburg’s anthropological thought and his theories on tools or devices developed against the backdrop of the First World War, with Wellcome’s simultaneous collecting of medieval and early modern technologies of disability. Ranging from surgical tools to clappers owned by sufferers of leprosy, from materia medica manuscripts to experiments in metal prosthesis, Wellcome conceived of these objects as part of a « universal » history of the human being. We are interosted in the roles played by such items in framing disabled persons in the past, as well as their use in recovering marginalised histories for the present. Through considering instruments of medical practice, visual means of social exclusion, and technologies of mobility, we hope to challenge conventional accounts of the history of science and art. Workshop participants are encouraged to explore the intellectual potential alongside the affective and inclusive concerns of the material histories of disability. By engaging hands-on with collection and archive materials, we will ask among other questions: Who had the knowledge to produce instruments or tools of disability? How much did makers, health practitioners, and users collaborate in devising them? How practical were these technologies? Whose aesthetic sensibilities did they serve? In what ways did these objects participate in the cultural construction of disability? What are the ethical stokes of terminology in histories of an and science, as well as in our archiving of historical disability? In what ways are our inquiries today shaped by Warburg and Wollcomes turn of the century scholarly enterprises?


Participants are invited to join research staff, fellows, and faculty for two days devoted to Wellcome’s rich collections and the Worburg’s intellectual resources in premodern European culture. Due to work with original objects, space is limited. We are seeking researchers from across the arts, humanities, and social sciences to join programmed speakers. PhD students, postdocs, and other early career scholars are especially encouraged to apply.

Please send a 300 word proposal outlining the relevance of the workshop to your research and your motivations for attending along with any accessibility needs and a CV to Jess Bailey (j.baileyewellcome.ac.uk) by 03 April 2020. The workshop is generously supported by Wellcome Collection and the Warburg Institute. It is organized by Jess Bailey (WellcomeTrust, University of California at Berkeley) and Felix Jager (Bilderfahrzeuge, The Warburg Institute, London.)