Call for Papers — Tijdschrift voor Genderstudies/Journal of Gender Studies – Dis/abling Gender – ed. by Amsterdam University Press and Tijdschrift voor Genderstudies

Special Issue Guest Editors: Evelien Geerts, Josephine Hoegaerts, Kristien Hens, Daniel Blackie

The recent, and ongoing, COVID-19 pandemic has made explicit what many of us already knew: good health and able-bodiedness are fluid and uncertain states. We can only ever hold them precariously (Butler 2004; Scully 2014), as their value and definition are intrinsically unstable and intersectionally linked to situated intelligibility systems that attribute meaning to gender, race/ethnicity, sexual orientation, class, and many other lived identity categories and labels (Parker 2015). What it means to be dis/able(d) has changed radically over time—and is still changing—under the policing influence of normalcy-dictating medical-psychiatric discourses and neoliberal bio-/necropolitical regimes (Tremain 2006; Chen 2012), while simultaneously being positively impacted by grassroots intersectional disability justice activism (Mingus 2011; Piepzna-Samarasinha 2018), critical disability studies, and critical pedagogical frameworks.

The COVID-19 crisis has had a brutal impact on the world and its population, and specifically on those whose bodies were already constructed to matter less through the intertwined, negatively constructed binaries that uphold the exclusivist notion of the ‘pure’, ‘neutral’  and healthy human subject. At the same time, the crisis also has demonstrated the porosity of these oppositional boundaries, such as the boundaries drawn between the human, non-human, more-than-human, and the perpetually dehumanised, the personal/political, and the able/disabledbodied: The SARS-CoV-2 virus and the patchwork of crises it has created (and reinforced) does not only point at human identity and subjectivity being more in flux and in conjunction with (more-than-human) others than the Cartesian self tells us, but also demonstrates that the condition of vulnerability is an existentially shared one and therefore cannot be subsumed under one linear temporal framework. Long COVID, for instance, demonstrates how vulnerable we all are, in the end, and how the linear temporal framework backing up the (dis)abledness narrative needs to be urgently queered, and also placed in the context of longer histories of crisis, in which experiences of ill health, mutilation, and various dis/abilities have played an important role (Bourke 1996; Nair 2020). Another aspect that the pandemic crisis has underlined sharply, is the fact that both the experience of—and the care for—able and disabled bodies is an intrinsically gendered affair (Forestell 2006). These experiences are furthermore deeply bound up with equally gendered notions of labour, authority, and autonomy (Rose 2017); a topic that has been central to the discipline of gender studies from the outset.

Taking the foregoing into account, this special issue of Tijdschrift voor Genderstudies (Journal of Gender Studies), wishes to explore the intersections between complex lived experiences of dis/ability and gender through an explicit engagement with the links and tensions between the scholarly and activist fields of gender studies and critical disability studies (see e.g., Meekosha & Shuttleworth 2009) while taking stock of important present-day turns and debates in and at the intersections of both fields.

More concretely: What happens, this issue wonders, if we take the call—contested by scholars such as Bone (2017) but at the same time emphasised by Kafer (2013)—for ‘cripping’ scholarship, policy, and practice seriously in gender studies and feminism? What happens if we think beyond transdisciplinary exchange, and purposefully stretch towards a theoretical framework and grounded practice of dis/abling gender studies? How can the insights and methods of critical disability studies, with its radical turn toward vulnerability, diversity, and resilience push gender studies toward new understandings of identity, corporeal praxis, labour, and care? How can gender studies, and specifically, novel approaches within contemporary feminist theory, assist critical disability studies with the intersectional conceptualisation of specific lived experiences, surveillance and (in)visibility regimes, and a more affirmative understanding of identities-in-flux and (reappropriated) labels? In short, can we not only ‘gender’ disability (Smith & Hutchinson, 2004), but also dis/able gender?

We particularly welcome submissions that address the following questions and issues:

  1. The challenges and rewards of interdisciplinary dialogue between gender studies and critical disability studies;
  2. Intersections of gender, dis/ability, and ethnicity/race from a theoretical and/or experiential perspective (e.g., Samuels 2011).
  3. How to study dis/abilities on both an experiential and representational level;
  4. Changes in philosophical, historical (Stiker 1999), and sociological (e.g., Thomas 2007) models of dis/ability;
  5. New materialist, posthumanist, and affective theoretical approaches (e.g., Goodley et al. 2014; Feely 2016);
  6. Changes in terminology within gender studies and critical disability studies (e.g., ‘crip’ as a reappropriated term);
  7. ‘Bodies that are made to (not) matter’, for example in the context of health crises;
  8. The potential of historical studies to generate new theoretical insights on dis/ability and gender (e.g., Rembis 2019);
  9. (Neoliberal) academic spaces, ablebodiedness, normativity and critical pedagogical approaches (including neurodiversity & neurotypicality)
  10.  Dis/ability and the questions of labour and care (i.e., who is supposed to request accommodations; provide care; …)
  11.  Links and tensions between the women’s and disability rights movements, and the role of activism in practices of dis/abling gender (‘everyday activism’)

References used:

  • Bone, K. (2017). Trapped Behind the Glass: Crip theory and Disability Identity. Disability & Society 32(9).
  • Bourke, J. (1996). Dismembering the Male: Men’s Bodies, Britain and the Great War. The University of Chicago Press.
  • Butler, J. (2004). Precarious life: The Powers of Mourning and Violence. Verso.
  • Chen, M. Y. (2012). Animacies: Biopolitics, Racial Mattering, and Queer Affect. Durham University Press.
  • Goodley, D., R. Lawthom, and K. Runswick Cole (2014). Posthuman Disability Studies. Subjectivity 7 (4).
  • Feely, M. (2016). Disability Studies After the Ontological Turn: A Return to the Material World and Material Bodies Without a Return to Essentialism. Disability & Society 31(7).
  • Forestell, Nancy M. (2006). ‘And I Feel Like I’m Dying from Mining for Gold’: Disability, Gender, and the Mining Community, 1920-1950. Labor: Studies in Working-Class History of the Americas 3(3).
  • Kafer, A. (2013). Feminist, Queer, Crip. Indiana University Press.
  • Mingus, M. (2011, February 12). Changing the Framework: Disability Justice: How Our Communities Can Move Beyond Access To Wholeness. Leaving Evidence. https://leavingevidence.wordpress.com/2011/02/12/changing-the-framework-disability-justice/.
  • Nair, A. (2020). ‘These Curly-Bearded, Olive-Skinned Warriors’: Medicine, Prosthetics, Rehabilitation and the Disabled Sepoy in the First World War, 1914-1920. Social History of Medicine 33 (3).
  • Parker, A. M. (2015). Intersecting Histories of Gender, Race, and Disability. Journal of Women’s History 27 (1).
  • Piepzna-Samarasinha, L. L. (2018). Care Work: Dreaming Disability Justice. Arsenal Pulp Press.
  • Meekosha, H., and R. Shuttleworth (2009). What’s so ‘Critical’ about Critical Disability Studies?  Australian Journal of Human Rights 15 (1).
  • Rembis, M. (2019). Challenging the Impairment/Disability Divide: Disability History and the Social Model of Disability. In: N. Watson and S. Vehmas (eds). The Routledge Handbook of Disability Studies, 2nd Edition. Routledge.
  • Rose, S. F. (2017). No Right to be Idle: The Invention of Disability, 1840s-1930s. The University of North Carolina Press.
  • Scully, J. L. (2014). Disability and Vulnerability: On Bodies, Dependence, and Power. In: C. Mackenzie, W. Rogers, and S. Dodds (eds.). Vulnerability: New Essays in Ethics and Feminist Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
  • Samuels, E. (2011). Examining Millie and Christine McKoy: Where Enslavement and Enfreakment Meet. Signs 37 (1).
  • Smith, B. and B. Hutchinson (eds) (2004). Gendering Disability. Rutgers University Press.
  • Stiker, H. J. (1999). A History of Disability. University of Michigan Press.
  • Thomas, C. (2007). Sociologies of Disability and Illness: Contested Ideas in Disability Studies and Medical Sociology. Palgrave Macmillan
  • Tremain, S. (ed.). (2006). Foucault and the Government of Disability. The University of Michigan Press.

About the Journal:

Tijdschrift voor Genderstudies (Journal of Gender Studies) is a Dutch and English language forum for the scientific problematisation of gender in relation to ethnicity, sexuality, class, and age. The journal aims to contribute to debates about gender and diversity in the Netherlands and Flanders. The journal is an interdisciplinary medium operating at the intersection of society, culture, the humanities, health, and science.

Tijdschrift voor Genderstudies (The Journal of Gender Studies) is published by Amsterdam University Press: Tijdschrift voor Genderstudies | Amsterdam University Press (aup.nl)

Guest editors:

Evelien Geerts, University of Birmingham, e.m.l.geerts@bham.ac.uk

Josephine Hoegaerts, University of Helsinki, josephine.hoegaerts@helsinki.fi

Kristien Hens, University of Antwerp, kristien.hens@uantwerpen.be

Daniel Blackie, University of Helsinki, daniel.blackie@helsinki.fi

Preparing your submission:

We invite potential contributors to submit an abstract of 500 words by the 1st of May 2021. The final paper should be 6000 words maximum. Abstracts for traditional scholarly articles should outline the theoretical/praxis-related contribution, method of analysis, and a selection of references (the latter do not have to be included in the word count). Suggestions for non-traditional, critically, and scholarly informed contributions are welcome as well. Please include the contact details of all of the contributors on the abstract document. Abstracts (and manuscripts) can be written in English or Dutch. Please note that the initial acceptance of an abstract does not guarantee publication and that the manuscripts will undergo a double-blind review process. We strive toward diversity among our contributors in terms of career-stage, disciplines, self-identification, and scholarly or activist affiliation. We are happy to accommodate different accessibility needs or diverse styles of communication. Please get in touch with (one of) the editors for any of these issues.

The author(s) should email their abstract proposal as a Word file to all of the guest editors: e.m.l.geerts@bham.ac.uk, josephine.hoegaerts@helsinki.fi, kristien.hens@uantwerpen.be , daniel.blackie@helsinki.fi. For specific questions or more information, contact the guest editors.

Submission timeline:

May, 1, 2021: Abstract submission deadline.

May, 14, 2021: Notification of acceptance/rejection and feedback from the guest editors for accepted abstracts.

August, 14, 2021: Manuscript submission deadline.

August, 14, 2021 – September 14, 2021: Double-blind review process plus feedback from the guest editors.

October, 14, 2021: Full and finalized manuscript submission deadline.

Conference – In Sickness and in Health – Online / Haifa University, Jan 12–13, 2021

Imago – The Israeli Association of Visual Culture in the Middle Ages and the Early Modern Period, and the Department of Art History, University of Haifa are thrilled to publish the program of the 14th Annual Imago conference:

“In Sickness and in Health: Pestilence, Disease, and Healing in Medieval and Early Modern Art”.

The two-day international conference will be held online, January 12-13, 2021.

We invite you to join us for a rich event that will explore a diverse variety of fascinating subjects, such as “Healing, Humor and Pleasure”, “The Sick and Disabled Body”, and “Gendering Disease”.

Participation is free and there are no registration fees. To attend, please fill out the online registration form (below).

PROGRAM

DAY 1 – Tuesday, 12 January 2021

09:00–09:30 GREETINGS and Opening Remarks

Efraim Lev, Dean – Faculty of Humanities, University of Haifa
Emma Maayan-Fanar, Chairperson – Department of Art History, University of Haifa
Gil Fishhof, Chairperson – Imago, The Israeli Association for Visual Culture in the Middle Ages


09:30–11:00 SESSION 1. Plague and the Artistic Process: Continuity, Change and Opportunity
Chair: Gil Fishhof, University of Haifa

Daniel Unger, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev
Carlo Borromeo’s Plague in Bolognese Painting

Cyprien Fuchs, Neuchâtel University
Picturing the Black Death as an Opportunity. The Case of Taddeo Gaddi’s San Giovanni Fuorcivitas Polyptych

Rita Yates, Warburg Institute, University of London
The Sacred Heart of Jesus: Image, Rhetoric, and Practice during the Great Plague of Marseille (1720-22)


– 11:00–11:30 Coffee Break –


11:30–13:00 SESSION 2. Images and the Codification of Medical Knowledge
Chair: Daniel Unger, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev

Sivan Gottlieb, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem
The Art of Healing: The Case of a Hebrew Herbal

Elena Berger, Institute of World History, Russian Academy of Science
From Prophecy to Medical Treatises: “Monsters” in Medical Illustrations of Early Modern France

Kathleen Walker-Meikle, King’s College, London
The Zodiac Horse: Animals in Astrological-Medical Diagrams in the Late Medieval and Early Modern Periods


– 13:00–14:30 Lunch Break –


14:30–16:00 SESSION 3. Healing, Humor and Pleasure
Chair: Gili Shalom, Tel-Aviv University

Dafna Nissim, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev
Pleasures vs. Plague Fear – Court Scenes in Two Manuscripts of The Decameron Made for Philip the Good

Anne Williams, University of Richmond
Healing Laughter: Death and Humor in Medieval Art

Fabienne Gallaire, Independent Scholar
Looking through the Glass: The Uroscopist Figure as Visual Satire


– 16:00–16:30 Coffee Break –


16:30–18:00 Session 4. The Sick and Disabled Body
Chair: Emma Maayan-Fanar, University of Haifa

Gili Shalom, Tel-Aviv University
Healing of the Disabled in St. Honorius Portal at Amiens Cathedral and Its Reception

Jennifer M. Feltman, The University of Alabama
The Afflicted Body and the Aesthetic of Wholeness in Gothic Sculpture

Sharon Strocchia and Ryan Kelly, Emory University
Picturing the Pox in Italian Popular Prints, 1550-1650

DAY 2 – Wednesday, 13 January 2021

09:30–11:30 SESSION 1. Gendering Disease and Healing
Chair: Jochai Rosen, University of Haifa

Nirit Ben Aryeh Debby, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev
Female Saints and the Plague in Italy: St. Clare of Assisi and St. Catherine of Siena

Sara Benninga, Tel-Aviv University
Lovesickness and Stone Operations: Gendered Disease and its Artistic Representation

Anastasija Ropa, Latvian Academy of Sport Education
Depicting Disease and Healing in the Early Modern Rus: The Story of St. Pyotr and St. Fevronia

Sharon Khalifa-Gueta, University of Haifa
The Image of St. Margaret Emerging from the Dragon as an Emotional Director for Coping with Childbirth


– 11:30–12:00 Coffee Break –


12:00–13:30 SESSION 2. The Power of Images: Healing and Apotropaic Functions
Chair: Sharon Khalifa-Gueta, University of Haifa

Giuditta Gentile, Independent Scholar
Sacred Images to Ward off the Plague: The Case of an Early Sixteenth-Century Italian Print

Shir Blum, Tel-Aviv University
Assisting in Childbirth: The Material Variety of Amulets as Obstetrical Aides

Rebekkah C. Hart, University of California, Riverside
‘Against All Unknown Afflictions’: Medicine and Healing in English Alabaster ‘St. John’s Heads’ (c. 1417-1550)


– 13:30-15:00 Lunch Break –


15:00–17:00 SESSION 3. Sites of Healing: Space, Identity and Trauma
Chair: Assaf Pinkus, Tel-Aviv University

Brittany Forniotis, Duke University
Out of Sight, Out of Mind: Italian Lazzaretti and Collective Trauma in Fourteenth and Fifteenth-Century Italian Cities

Joana Balsa de Pinho, University of Lisbon,
Renaissance Hospitals in Portugal: Art and Architecture Regarding Sickness and Health

Anđela Gavrilović, University of Belgrade
The Scenes of Christ’s Miraculous Healings in the Church of Hagia Sophia in Trebizond: The Meaning and the Reasons of Their Depiction

Emily Jay, Texas Tech University
Hollow, Hallowed Body: Santa Rosalia and the Reconstruction of Identities in Palermo during the 1624 Plague

The conference will be held online via Zoom. For registration and a link to the meetings please register at the link below, or contact gfishhof@staff.haifa.ac.il
https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSf5-EIeBObP-Euybk2GRk-Mghs_NWKt4vjorPzZ2p6JObzdiQ/viewform?fbclid=IwAR2x6E8hDNGhXhYUgYfKTVVm7CvBruQ0_oQIOz892EMhPfVKXiGVlJurXJ4

The conference is held according to Israel local time (GMT+2).

Organizing committee: Gil Fishhof, Mazi Kuzi, Jochai Rosen, Margo Stroumsa-Uzan

More infos on the organisator website

New Book – Sara Ritchey, Sharon Strocchia (eds), Gender, Health, and Healing, 1250-1550 – Amsterdam University Press

Sara Ritchey, Sharon Strocchia (eds), Gender, Health, and Healing, 1250-1550

This path-breaking collection offers an integrative model for understanding health and healing in Europe and the Mediterranean from 1250 to 1550. By foregrounding gender as an organizing principle of healthcare, the contributors challenge traditional binaries that ahistorically separate care from cure, medicine from religion, and domestic healing from fee-for-service medical exchanges. The essays collected here illuminate previously hidden and undervalued forms of healthcare and varieties of body knowledge produced and transmitted outside the traditional settings of university, guild, and academy. They draw on non-traditional sources — vernacular regimens, oral communications, religious and legal sources, images and objects — to reveal additional locations for producing body knowledge in households, religious communities, hospices, and public markets. Emphasizing cross-confessional and multilinguistic exchange, the essays also reveal the multiple pathways for knowledge transfer in these centuries. Gender, Health, and Healing, 1250-1550 provides a synoptic view of how gender and cross-cultural exchange shaped medical theory and practice in later medieval and Renaissance societies.

Introduction – Gendering Medieval Health and Healing: New Sources, New Perspectives
Sara Ritchey and Sharon Strocchia
 
PART 1: Sources of Religious Healing
 
Caring by the Hours: The Psalter as a Gendered Health care Technology
Sara Ritchey
 
Female Saints as Agents of Female Healing: Gendered Practices and Patronage in the Cult of St. Cunigunde
Iliana Kandzha
 
PART 2: Producing and Transmitting Medical Knowledge
 
Blood, Milk and Breastbleeding: The Humoral Economy of Women’s Bodies in Late Medieval Medicine
Montserrat Cabré and Fernando Salmón
 
Care of the Breast in the Late Middle Ages: The Tractatus de Passionibus Mamillarum
Belle S. Tuten
 
Household Medicine for a Renaissance Court: Caterina Sforza’s Ricettario Reconsidered
Sheila Barker and Sharon Strocchia
 
Understanding/Controlling the Female Body in Ten Recipes: Print and the Dissemination of Medical Knowledge about Women in the Early Sixteenth Century
Julia Gruman Martins
 
PART 3: Infirmity and Care
 
Ubi non est mulier, ingemiscit egens? Gendered Perceptions of Care from the Thirteenth to Sixteenth Centuries
Eva-Maria Cersovsky
 
Domestic Care in the Sixteenth Century: Expectations, Experiences, and Practices from a Gendered Perspective
Cordula Nolte
 
Bathtubs as a Healing Approach in Fifteenth-Century Ottoman Medicine
Ayman Yasin Atat
 
PART 4: (In)fertility and Reproduction
 
Gender, Old Age, and the Infertile Body in Medieval Medicine
Catherine Rider
 
Gender Segregation and the Possibility of Arabo-Galenic Gynecological Practice in the Medieval Islamic World
Sara Verskin
 
Afterword: Healing Women and Women Healers
Naama Cohen-Hanegbi

CFP – Gender and History – Special Issue: Health, Healing and Caring

Gender & History is an international journal for research and writing on the history of femininity, masculinity and gender relations. This Call for Papers is aimed at scholars studying any country or region, and any temporal period, including the classical, medieval, early modern, modern, and contemporary periods.

This Special Issue will explore the gendered history of healing and caring from the perspective of the sick and suffering, and various types of healers and caregivers. It aims to move beyond institutional histories of biomedicine, canonical medical knowledge, and allopathic approaches to health. We seek to showcase research that reflects upon the gendered dynamics of palliative care and the formation of diverse communities and economies of health and healing. We recognize that historical reckonings of health and bodily knowledge in many locales have been dominated by sources maintained in state, colonial, and missionary archives, and by notions of medicine shaped in white settler institutions. In an effort to destabilize these reckonings and to uncover marginalized forms of knowledge and practice, we encourage research informed by diverse methodologies and an imaginative approach to source material.

In recent years, medical anthropologists have shed light on the complex and unequal co-production of biomedical knowledge and “traditional” forms of medicine while feminist sociologists have illuminated the gendered dynamics of caregiving and the devaluation of its everyday and emotional labor. How might historians engage these cross-disciplinary methods and insights to reconstruct more nuanced and more expansive histories of healing and caring? What happens to our gendered histories of illness and medicine when we de-naturalize biomedical formations and examine palliative care in addition to therapeutic treatment? How has gender shaped which forms of healing and caring are recognized and institutionalized, and how has such privileging changed over time?

We understand that historically a wide array of people have provided healing and caring including family members, shamans, spirit mediums, healers, Elders, herbalists, diviners, faith healers, and wise-women and men as well as midwives, nurses, aids, and doctors. Their practices have ranged from diagnosing illnesses, administering medicines, and performing procedures to offering spiritual and psychological counsel. They have also included forms of body work such as grooming, feeding, bathing, massage and manipulation, and handling the dead.

Papers are invited from established scholars as well as new, emerging, and unaffiliated scholars who consider a variety of historical moments and locations, or transnational and even global processes related to themes such as the following:

●Intersectional approaches that examine how social identities and inequalities rooted in gender,race, ethnicity, sexuality, class, religion, and nationality have long shaped people’s access tohealth resources and care and, in turn, given rise to disparate patterns and experiences of well-being and illness.

●Reconstruction of deep histories of gendered healing and caring, extending back well before thetwentieth century, that reveal how healing and caring practices have been central concerns forboth individuals and societies and how those concerns have often animated and reconfiguredcultural institutions, political ideologies, and economic relations and markets.

●Consideration of the connections and tensions between various modes of healing and palliation,and how those relations have informed the frequently gendered and racialized separation of“professional” and “modern” medicine from modes designated as “traditional,” “informal,”“alternative,” or “home-based.”

●Examination of how people have transmitted healing and caring epistemologies and practicesacross generations and geographic distances, including how women have sought to maintain orassert control over their health and how various archives have worked both to represent andobscure those efforts.

●Engagement with concepts from disability studies, queer theory, and crip theory to betterunderstand the history of illnesses and diseases that have often been both gendered andstigmatized such as depression, hysteria, reproductive maladies, infertility, and sexuallytransmitted infections.

Interested individuals are asked to submit 500-word abstracts, a brief biography (250 words), and a cv by 31 August 2019 at 5pm PDT for consideration. Abstracts will be reviewed by the guest editors and successful proponents will participate in a symposium at Vancouver Island University in British Columbia, Canada, on 8 May 2020. Papers must be submitted six weeks prior to the symposium. Papers should be 6000-8000 words in length. After the symposium, papers will go through the journal’s peer review system. As with any article, there is no guarantee of publication. The editors are in the process of applying for funding to defray the cost of the travel to the symposium for new, emerging, and unaffiliated scholars. Please send abstracts, biographies, and CVs by email to genderhistory@viu.ca or by mail to The Editors, Gender & History, Vancouver Island University, 900 Fifth Street, Nanaimo, BC V9R 5S5. The Special Issue will be edited by Drs. Kristin Burnett, Sara Ritchey, and Lynn M. Thomas.

Special Issue Timeline Abstracts to SI editors — 31 August 2019 Papers circulated to symposium participants — 15 March 2020 Symposium at Vancouver Island University (Nanaimo, British Columbia) — 8 May 2020Full submissions to SI editors (papers submitted on ScholarOne) for peer review — 31 August, 2020 Revised submissions (and any image permissions) to SI editors — 31 May 2021 Publication — October 2021

CFP – « Gender and ‘Aliens' » – Gender and Medieval Studies Conference 2019

« Gender and ‘Aliens' » –

Gender and Medieval Studies Conference 2019

 

In recent years discourse around ‘aliens’, as migrants living in modern nation-states, has been highly polarised, and the status of people who are technically termed legal or illegal aliens by the governments of those states has often been hotly contested. It is evident from studies of the past, however, that the movement of people is not a recent phenomenon: in the medieval west, one of the Latin terms applied to such people was alieni (‘foreigners’, or ‘strangers’), and it is clear from the surviving evidence that there were many people in the Middle Ages who could be, and indeed were, identified as aliens. This conference aims to stimulate debate about the ways in which gender intersected with and related to the idea of such aliens – and, more broadly, alienation – in the medieval world. Social, political and religious attitudes to aliens and the alienated were not constant over the centuries from c. 400 to c. 1500, and nor were they uniform across the whole world. Some foreigners, as aliens, might end up integrated into the societies they entered; others might find themselves marginalised, lonely or alone; or oppressed, as outlaws, outcasts, or slaves. Gender might exacerbate or mitigate this, depending on time, place and context. Authors or artists depicting parts of the world far from and alien to their own often filled them with people or beings not like them, demonstrating the imaginative power of alterity, while the reactions of those who encountered people from distant places and observed or participated in their customs could include recognition of similarity as well as difference. Foreigners were also not the only people who might find themselves alienated from, or within, certain societies or cultures: the medieval world included many marginalised groups. The issues of aliens and alienation may be differently construed in the modern world, but they are certainly not new. The relationship of gender to these topics is complex, variable and significant.

The conference aims to enable discussion of these issues as they relate to the whole medieval world from c. 400 to c. 1500. The organisers welcome proposals for papers on any topic related to gender and aliens or alienation, broadly construed, and encourage submissions relating to the world beyond Europe. Papers might consider issues such as:

* refugees, immigrants, emigrants

* inclusion and exclusion

* alterity and difference

* outlaws, the law, legality

* marginalised or disenfranchised groups

* non-normative bodies, illness, disability

* acculturation

* imagined geographies

* borders and frontiers

* ethnicity and identity

* slavery and slaves

In addition to sessions of papers, the conference will also include a poster session. Proposals for a 20-minute paper or for a poster can be submitted at https://tinyurl.com/gms2019submit by September 30th 2018. The conference organisers are also happy to consider proposals for other kinds of presentation: please contact the organisers at gmsconference2019@gmail.com to discuss these. Some travel bursaries will be available for students and unwaged delegates to attend this conference: please see http://medievalgender.co.uk/ for details.