Archives par mot-clé : Disability

CFS – Disability History Association Outstanding Publication Award 2018: Outstanding Article or Book Chapter Award – 1st may 2018

CFS: DHA Outstanding Article or Book Chapter Award (1 May 2018)

Disability History Association Outstanding Publication Award 2018: Outstanding Article or Book Chapter Award

The Disability History Association (DHA) promotes the relevance of disability to broader historical enquiry and facilitates research, conference travel, and publication for scholars engaged in any field of disability history.

*****

DHA is excited to announce its 7th Annual Outstanding Publication Award.

In 2018, the award committee will accept article and book chapter submissions. Submissions are welcome from scholars in all fields who engage in work relating to the history of disability. Article and book chapter submissions may have one or multiple authors. They must contain new and original scholarship.

Although the award is open to all authors covering all geographic areas and time periods, the publication must be in English, and must have a publication date within the year preceding the submission date (i.e. 1/1/2017 – 5/1/2018). If your article or book chapter was published in 2017, or it will be published in the first four months of 2018, your article or book chapter is eligible for the prize.

The amount of the award is $200 for first place and $100 for honorable mention.

All submissions should be sent to the award committee care of Michael Rembis no later than May 1, 2018.

Authors should arrange for one electronic (.pdf or .doc) copy of the article or book chapter to be sent directly to the award committee at: Michael Rembis, Department of History, University at Buffalo, marembis@buffalo.edu.

In the interest of modeling best practices in the field of disability history, we require that the publisher/author provide an electronic copy in text-based .pdf or .doc file compatible with screen reading software for the review committee. We understand that copyright rules apply, and we will only use the electronic copy for the purposes of the DHA Outstanding Publication Award.  Manuscripts not provided in accessible electronic formats for screen reading software in a timely manner will not be considered for the prize.

Please include the full bibliographic citation of your submission in the Chicago Manual of Style format.

The Disability History Association Board will announce the recipient of the DHA Outstanding Publication Award in September 2018.

Members of the DHA Board are not eligible for the award.

More infos on H-Net.

New book – Trauma in Medieval Society – by Wendy J. Turner and Christina Lee

Trauma in Medieval Society

Series: Explorations in Medieval Culture, Volume: 7

 

 

Submary from the editor website:

Trauma in Medieval Society is an edited collection of articles from a variety of scholars on the history of trauma and the traumatised in medieval Europe. Looking at trauma as a theoretical concept, as part of the literary and historical lives of medieval individuals and communities, this volume brings together scholars from the fields of archaeology, anthropology, history, literature, religion, and languages. The collection offers insights into the physical impairments from and psychological responses to injury, shock, war, or other violence—either corporeal or mental. From biographical to socio-cultural analyses, these articles examine skeletal and archival evidence as well as literary substantiation of trauma as lived experience in the Middle Ages.

Contributors are Carla L. Burrell, Sara M. Canavan, Susan L. Einbinder, Michael M. Emery, Bianca Frohne, Ronald J. Ganze, Helen Hickey, Sonja Kerth, Jenni Kuuliala, Christina Lee, Kate McGrath, Charles-Louis Morand Métivier, James C. Ohman, Walton O. Schalick, III, Sally Shockro, Patricia Skinner, Donna Trembinski, Wendy J. Turner, Belle S. Tuten, Anne Van Arsdall, and Marit van Cant.

More info on the editor website.

Disability in Latin Medieval Philosophy and Theology Disability in Latin Medieval Philosophy and Theology conference – April 26–28, 2018 – Notre Dame University

Disability in Latin Medieval Philosophy and Theology Disability in Latin Medieval Philosophy and Theology conference

April 26–28, 2018

McKenna Hall Notre Dame Conference Center

Programme :

Organizers:     Prof. Richard Cross (richard.cross@nd.edu)

Prof. Scott M. Williams (swillia8@unca.edu)

 

Thursday, April 26th, 2018

3:00-3:30pm    Coffee & Snacks

 

3:30-4:50pm  –  Kevin Timpe, “Thomas Aquinas on Disability” (Calvin College)

Chair: Christina van Dyke (Calvin College)

Commentator: Richard Cross (University of Notre Dame)

 

Friday, April 27th, 2018

8:15-9:00am    Breakfast & Coffee for All

 

9:00-10:20am  –  Gloria Frost, “Congenital Disabilities” (University of St. Thomas)  (via Skype)

Chair: Miguel Romero (Salve Regina University)

Commentator: Scott M. Williams (UNC Asheville)

 

10:35-11:55am  –  John Slotemaker, “Aquinas and Ockham on the Imago Dei and Intellectual Disabilities”

Chair: Mark K. Spencer (University of St. Thomas)

Commentator: Miguel Romero (Salve Regina University)

 

12-1:30pm    Lunch for all

 

1:30-2:50pm  –  Scott M. Williams, “Ableism, Medieval Concepts of Personhood, and Imago Dei Trinitatis

Chair: Richard Cross (University of Notre Dame)

Commentator: John Slotemaker (Fairfield University)

 

3:05-4:25pm  –  Miguel Romero, “Interpreting amentia in the Aristotelian-Thomistic Tradition: 16th Century Spanish Colonialism and the Disappearance of a Latin Medieval Account of Cognitive Impairment”

Chair: Thomas Ward (Baylor University)

Commentator: Mark K. Spencer (University of St. Thomas)

 

 

Saturday, April 28th, 2018

8:15-9:00am    Breakfast & Coffee for All

 

9:00-10:20am  –  Christina van Dyke, “Taking the ‘Dis’ out of Disability: Martyrs, Mystics, and Mothers in the Middle Ages” (Calvin College)

Chair: Kevin Timpe (Calvin College)

Commentator: Scott M. Williams (UNC Asheville)

 

10:35-11:55am  –  Mark K. Spencer, “Separated Souls: Disability in the Intermediate State”

Chair: Richard Cross (University of Notre Dame)

Commentator: Thomas Ward (Baylor University)

 

12-1:30pm    Lunch for all

 

1:30-2:50pm  –  Richard Cross, “Disabilities in Heaven”

Chair: Scott M. Williams (UNC Asheville)

Commentator: Christina van Dyke (Calvin College)

 

3:05-4:25pm – Thomas Ward, “Thomas Aquinas and Duns Scotus: Disabilities and the Beatific Vision”

Chair: John Slotemaker (Fairfield University)

Commentator: Kevin Timpe (Calvin College)

 

4:35-5:15 – Closing Panel Session with Conference Speakers

Chair: Scott M. Williams (UNC Asheville)

More infos on the university of Notre Dame website.

Meeting – Workshop – The All-seeing eye? Vision and Eyesight Across Time and Cultures Workshop, 2018

The All-seeing eye?

Vision and Eyesight Across Time and Cultures Workshop, 2018

Wed 11 April 2018 – 09:30 – 17:00

 

A call for papers has been issued for this workshop which will explore medical, social, and cultural meanings of the eye and vision in contemporary and historical perspective. Vision has often provoked fascination within societies and cultures as the most revered sense. In Western Europe, the eye has been viewed scientifically as the most ‘exquisite’ organ, or spiritually as a ‘window to the soul’. These positions have had an influence on how the eye has been perceived, both as a vital organ and, by implication, one that needed to be protected. Whilst the eye could bring delight to its holder, and be symbolic in a variety of ways, it could also, when lost, incur significant impairment. The workshop will explore this vision impairment and correction, and the extent to which sight loss has been stigmatised. It will welcome papers that explore eyesight and its meanings across time and place, to encourage trans-historical and interdisciplinary discussion

 

Programme :

9.30am Registration 

10am Panel One

Dr Corinne Doria, Paris 1-Pantheon-Sorbonne University; University of Milan, ‘Defining Normal Vision. Eye charts in 19th Century Europe’

Dr Andy Flack, University of Bristol, ‘Vision and touch in the depths of the Mammoth Cave’

Dr Deborah Ellen Thorpe, Trinity College, Dublin, ‘“Mynde, ye, and hand”: A palaeographical approach to medieval eyesight deterioration’

First Break

11.45-12.45 Keynote

Professor Graeme Gooday, ‘Beyond the visual: alternatives to ocularcentric histories of bodies and technologies’

Lunch

 1.45pm Panel Two

 Dr Ben Curtis, University of Wolverhampton, ‘‘The dread now prevailing’: Miners’ Nystagmus in the South Wales Coalfield in the Early Twentieth Century’,

Dr Karen Beauchamp-Pyror, Honorary Research Fellow, College of Human and Health Sciences, Swansea University, ‘Losses and gains: the impact of regaining and restoring vision’

Dr Michelle Carr, College of Human and Health Sciences, Swansea University, ‘Seeing in Your Dreams’

Second Break

3.30pm Panel Three

 Colin Harding, AHRC CDP Candidate, Imperial War Museum and University of Brighton, ‘Repairing War’s Ravages: Horace Nicholls’ photographs of prosthetic masks’

Iain Riddell, PhD Student, University of Leicester, School of Media, Communication & Sociology (Member of the Science Advisory Committee for the Childhood Cancer Trust, 2015-2018), ‘Making a beginning Retinoblastoma in adulthood, psycho-social contexts and imperatives’

4.45-5pm Wrap up the Day

Contact Information:

Gemma.Almond@sciencemuseum.ac.uk or Gemma.Almond@swansea.ac.uk

More infos on their website

Meetings – Seminar – Birkbeck Medieval Seminar: The Productive Medieval Body, Fri 1 June 2018, Keynes Library, School of Arts, Birkbeck, 43 Gordon Square, London.

Birkbeck Medieval Seminar: The Productive Medieval Body

Fri 1 June 2018,

Keynes Library, School of Arts, Birkbeck, 43 Gordon Square, London.

 

The Birkbeck Medieval Seminar is an annual event. It is free and open to all scholars of the Middle Ages. It is designed to foster conversation and debate on a particular topic within medieval studies by providing the opportunity to hear new research from experts in the field. We are a welcoming and inclusive environment. This venue is fully accessible. Please contact Isabel Davis (i.davis@bbk.ac.uk) for further information or if you need help using the registration site.

Speakers:

Kim Phillips (Auckland);

Maaike van der Lugt (Paris – Diderot);

Vincent Gillespie (Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford)

and Alicia Spencer-Hall (UCL).

Titles to be confirmed.

Coffee and tea is provided but you will need to find or bring your own lunch.

Please note: this is a free event and, as such, if you book a ticket and later find out that you cannot attend, please do cancel your booking so that your place can be made available to someone else.

 

More infos on the Evenbrite of the event

CFP – ‘Objects, Extensions, Prosthetics: The Body and Subjectivity in the Pre-Modern Period’ – 28th Feb 2018 – Newcastle University.

Objects, Extensions, Prosthetics: The Body and Subjectivity in the Pre-Modern Period

Wednesday 28th February 2018, 1-6pm Newcastle University.

We invite postgraduates and early career researchers based in the North to give short (15 minute) talks at an afternoon seminar event on Wednesday 28th February 2018. This event will include a key note from Professor Helen Smith (University of York) in response to the talks given and a group discussion of the topics to close, as well as a free lunch included. The seminar will focus on how objects function as extensions of the self the medieval and early modern period. Can objects be sites of emotional or literary expression? Do they reflect pre-modern notions vi interior/exterior selves? Can they be considered as Metonymic’ substitutions for the self? We invite PGRs/ECRs to present on this theme a, well as partake in group discussions over the course of the afternoon. Topics might include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • The body (skin, hair)
  • Fashion (clothing, textiles)
  • Prosthetics
  • Books (print., literary or personal, notebooks)
  • Stage props (/object and costumes)
  • Household items
  • Religious/sacred objects

If you would like to get involved with this seminar event and give a short paper, please send an expression of interest along with topic details (no more than 200 words) no later than 15thJanuary 2018. and/or any queries. to Emily Rowe – e.c.rowe2@newcastle.ac.uk

CFP – Chaucer: Sound and Vision – October 19th and 20th, 2018 – University of South Alabama

CFP – Chaucer: Sound and Vision,

October 19th and 20th, 2018

Deadline for Submissions: May 1, 2018

Name of Organization: University of South Alabama

Contact Email: ChaucerSoundAndVision@gmail.com

The English Department at the University of South Alabama invites paper proposals for a conference on Chaucer and the senses (vision, hearing, touch, smell, taste), to be held in Mobile, Alabama, October 19th and 20th, 2018. Papers on any aspect of the topic are welcome, along with papers on writers contemporary with Chaucer (Langland, Gower, the Pearl-poet, Julian of Norwich, etc.).

The plenary speaker will be Michael P. Kuczynski of Tulane University. The conference will also include a roundtable discussion on the state of Sound Studies. Outstanding papers will also be invited to submit expanded versions for an edited volume on the topic.

Please send proposals of 350 words to John Halbrooks and Becky McLaughlin at ChaucerSoundAndVision@gmail.com by May 1, 2018.

Meeting – ‘“Going to the Dogs?” A Workshop Series on Research at the Intersection of Disability and Animal Studies’ – 19 february 2018 – Leeds Centre for Medical Humanities

First meeting of ‘“Going to the Dogs?” A Workshop Series on Research at the Intersection of Disability and Animal Studies’.

On Monday 19 February 2018 from 2–5pm, Leeds Centre for Medical Humanities (based in the School of English, 6–10 Cavendish Road)

 

Responding to recent scholarship that has placed disability and animal studies in critical dialogue (see, for instance, Sunaura Taylor’s new book and the Canadian Journal of Disability Studies recent call for papers), this workshop will bring together three Leeds-based scholars, who will each approach the intersection of disability and animal studies from a different disciplinary and methodological perspective. The session will feature Karen Sayer, who is a Professor of Social and Cultural History at Leeds Trinity University; Sunny Harrison, who is a PhD candidate in the Institute for Medieval Studies at the University of Leeds; and Leah Burch, who is a PhD candidate in Sociology and Social Policy at the University of Leeds as well as a member of the Centre for Culture & Disability Studies at Liverpool Hope University. Respectively, their talks will cover the following topics:

Models of utility, disability, and occupational health in later medieval horse medicine.
The conceptualisation of disabled human labourers relative to conceptualisations of farm animals in nineteenth-century agriculture.
Instances of disability being animalised in contemporary hate speech.

Each talk will be followed by time for questions, and the workshop will end with a roundtable discussion about the ethical and methodological challenges of working on themes of disability and animals together. Tea and coffee will be provided.

Please note that there will be a follow-up artistic event (starring the disability artist Jenni-Juulia Wallinheimo-Heimonen) at The Tetley during the evening on Thursday 12 April 2018 and a second workshop (featuring Andy Flack, Justyna Włodarczyk, Neil Pemberton, and Rachael Gillibrand) on Friday 13 April 2018. More details regarding these events will follow.

If you have any questions or would like to book a place at the workshop in February—for FREE—please email the organiser, Dr Ryan Sweet, including details of anything that can be done to ensure that the event is accessible for you. Ryan’s email address is R.C.Sweet@leeds.ac.uk.

CFP – Brussels Medieval Culture and War Conference: Power, Authority, and Normativity – Université Saint-Louis of Bruxelles, 24–26 May 2018

Brussels Medieval Culture and War Conference: Power, Authority, and Normativity

Université Saint-Louis – Bruxelles
24–26 May 2018

An omnipresent phenomenon, war was a dominant social fact that impacted every aspect of society in the Middle Ages. Moving away from so-called ‘histoire-bataille’ that studied war on its own as an isolated succession of battles, studies have moved towards investigation of the reciprocal relationships between military conflicts and the economic, legal, political, religious, and social spheres in the Middle Ages.

Capture d_écran 2017-12-16 à 18.05.18

After previous meetings held at the University of Leeds in 2016 and the University of Lisbon in 2017, the 2018 edition of the ‘Medieval Culture and War Conference’ will take place at the Saint-Louis University, Brussels, and will focus on the theme of ‘Power, Authority, and Normativity’. We particularly welcome papers that discuss how medieval warfare, through the organisation, the techniques, and the discourses it mobilised, contributed to the shaping of power and power relationships, and how these power relations, in turn, could influence the adoption of certain forms of military organisation and techniques of warfare; how it related to the concept of authority; and how it was regulated by changing sets of rules over the period. How did power relationships, ideas about authority, and evolving norms have an impact on medieval warfare in theory and in practice? Interdisciplinary approaches from various theoretical backgrounds (e.g. archaeologi- cal, art historical, historical, literary, or sociological perspectives) are encouraged.

Subjects may include, but are not limited to:

  • Theory, doctrine, and ideology of war
  • War, propaganda, and rulership
  • Law and legislation on warfare
  • Literature on war and chivalry
  • Chivalric ethos and military discipline
  • Military justice and violence
  • Military organisation and logistics
  • Warfare and religion
  • Gender and war
  • Fortifications, weaponry, and technology
  • Real and imagined relations between combatants and non-combatants
  • Ideas of ‘Others’ and ‘Otherness’ in warfare
  • Funding of warfare

The conference, organised by the Research Centre for the include keynote presentations by Justine Firnhaber-Baker (University of St Andrews) and Bertrand Schnerb (Université Lille 3). The working language for the conference is English. Please submit an abstract of 250–300 words for a twenty-minute paper, or a proposal for a thematic session of three twenty-minute papers, with a short biography of 150 words, to brusselscultureandwar@gmail.com by 31 January 2018. Contributions from postgraduates and early career researchers are encouraged. A publication of selected proceedings is planned.

 

Brussels Organisation Commi ee: Eric Bousmar (Université Saint-Louis – Bruxelles), Michael Depreter (Université libre de Bruxelles/Université Saint-Louis – Bruxelles), Philippe Desmette (Université Saint-Louis – Bruxelles), Gilles Lecuppre (Université catholique de Louvain), and Quentin Verreycken (Université catholique de Louvain/Université Saint-Louis – Bruxelles).

In conjunction with the Leeds Executive Organisation Committee and the Lisbon Organisation Committee.

For more information visit their website: cultureandwarconference.wordpress.com/.

Meeting – Neuro-handwriting analysis: Where the Medieval and the 21st Century Collide by The Trinity Long Room Hub, Arts and Humanities Research Institute – 18th january

Description

Presenters: Dr Deborah Thorpe (TCD), Professor Stephen Smith (University of York, UK), Dr Márjory Da Costa-Abreu (DIMAp/UFRN, Brazil)

Bios:
Dr Deborah Thorpe is a Trinity Long Room Hub Marie Skłodowska-Curie Cofund Fellow. Trained as a palaeographer and a medical historian, she uses a combination of historical handwriting analysis and neurological insight to analyse the impact of ageing and age-related medical disorders on medieval script.

Professor Stephen Smith is a professor in the Department of Electronic Engineering at the University of York. His research is centred on developing evolutionary algorithms, a form of artificial intelligence, and applying them to the diagnosis and monitoring of neurological conditions such as Parkinson’s through the analysis of patients’ movements. Stephen is also co-founder and director of ClearSky Medical Diagnostics Ltd., a university spin-out company set up with the assistance of the Royal Academy of Engineering that markets clinically validated medical devices, developed from his research. Stephen is a Chartered Engineer and a Fellow of the British Computer Society.

Dr. Márjory Da Costa-Abreu is a lecturer in Artificial Intelligence at DIMAp/UFRN. She has a PhD in Electronic Engineering from the University of Kent (UK) and a MSc in Computer Science from UFRN (BR). She has experience in Biometrics analysis and identity prediction, forensics, the effects of ageing in biometrics and soft-biometric prediction techniques.

More info on Evenbrite website.