CFP – Leeds 2020 – (Un)bound Bodies: New Approaches

(Un)bound Bodies: New Approaches (Les corps (non)liés)

 
 
Leeds IMC | 6th-9th July 2020
 
For decades, bodies have been a central framework for historical inquiries. No matter how much we try to distance ourselves from them, bodies remain at the centre and borders of scholarship. Medieval bodies were fluid and contradictory loci: bound and unbound, contained yet susceptible to a host of external physical and invisible forces. Bodily boundaries were paradoxically sharp, debated, and real, yet also fluid, permeable and imaginary.
 
This new strand at IMC 2020 seeks to investigate these ‘real’ and ‘imaginary’ borders of the body and to complicate and critique existing narratives of ‘bound bodies’. As such, this strand is intentionally broad in its scope and embraces innovative and interdisciplinary approaches that push back, and go beyond, established methodologies. 
 
What? Twenty-minute papers; interest in a roundtable discussion also welcome
 
Who? Scholars from all career stages, eras and geographies. ECR and Queer approaches are particularly welcome. 
 
Suggested topics include (but are not limited to): 
 
· Un-binding scholarship: innovative approaches to bodies
 
· Bodily layers: ligaments, nerves, blood, bone, flesh, clothing
 
· Bodies and the cosmos: healing, magical influences, microcosm/macrocosm
 
· Bodies in flux: sensory experience, synaesthesia, bodily passions and emotions, cross dressing
 
· Bodily interactions: homosociality, sexuality, movement, legal systems
 
Please send titles and abstracts (maximum 250 words) together with a short biography and institutional affiliation (where relevant) to Jack Ford (jack.ford.13@ucl.ac.uk) or Lauren Rozenberg (lauren.rozenberg.14@ucl.ac.ukby 15th September.
 
Please also see the attached file for the CfP poster. Anyone applying will have to bear in mind that they will need to be registered to attend the IMC and unfortunately, as a new strand, we cannot cover any registration fees or transportation costs. Further information about the IMC can be found here: https://www.imc.leeds.ac.uk/

CFP – Leeds IMC 2020 – ‘Minority and Marginalised Experiences’, organised by An Australasian Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies

 

Recent scholarship has begun to acknowledge that the focus of Medieval and Early Modern Studies has long been on the elite, male, western European experience. New movements in academia are addressing this imbalance, acknowledging that women, ethnic minorities, and other marginalised groups contributed richly to the fabric of medieval and early modern life. Ceræ aims to join this shift in focus to the experiences of minority groups, marginalised peoples, and life in non-western territories with a conference session at IMC Leeds 2020.

Topics may include but are not limited to:

  • Experiences of minority or marginalised groups
  • Writings by minority or marginalised groups
  • Literary depictions of minority or marginalised groups
  • The effacement of minority or marginalised groups
  • Marginalia
  • Experiences on the transition of a border or landscape
  • The law of minority and marginalised groups
  • Minority and marginalised cultures, beliefs, and celebrations
  • Experiences of disability and physical and mental illness

Ceræ invites submissions encompassing all aspects of the late classical, medieval, and early modern world. There are no geographical restrictions. As an interdisciplinary journal, Ceræ encourages submissions across the fields of archaeology, art history, historical ecology, literature, linguistics,  intellectual history, musicology, politics, social studies, and beyond.

Abstracts of 250 words should be sent to editorcerae@gmail.com by 1st September 2019.

Attendees are responsible for all fees and costs associated with attending the IMC, and for registering for the congress.

For further enquiries contact our Editor: editorcerae@gmail.com; or get in touch via Facebook (facebook.com/CeraeJournal) or Twitter (@CeraeJournal).

CFP – ICMS 2020, Kalamazoo – Saintly Wounds – Sponsored by the Hagiography Society

CFP: ICMS 2020, Kalamazoo (May 7-10) CFP
Sponsored by the Hagiography Society
 
Saintly Wounds
 
Saints are inextricably linked with healing and healing miracles. Often, these miracles involve some type of wound. Wounds can be inflicted upon the saint him/herself, cured by the saint, or even intentionally caused by the saint. This session seeks to address this discussion of saintly wounds as a way to read hagiography, saints in context, and what saintly bodies can do. This panel aims for interdisciplinary and intersectional discussions, encouraging submission by those working in a wide variety of theoretical fields.
 
Possible questions include, but are not limited to:
· What is the relationship between sainthood and physicality and/or physicality and the divine?
· What is the role of disability, gender, and/or race?
· What role does performance, spectacle, and/or audience play?
· What limits, transgressions, or paradoxes do wounded bodies illuminate?
· What does the saint’s wound(s) reveal about attitudes toward the body?
 
Please send abstracts of 250-300 words, along with a completed Participant Information form, to session organizer Stephanie Grace-Petinos (stephanie.grace.petinos@gmail.com) by Sept 10, 2019. Please include your name, title, and affiliation on the abstract itself. All abstracts not accepted for the session will be forwarded to Congress administrators for consideration in general sessions, as per Congress regulations.
 
For this, and the other HS sessions, visit: https://www.hagiographysociety.org/?page_id=97

CFC – Dis/ability in the medieval Nordic world – A special issue of Mirator Editors: Anna Katharina Heiniger and Christopher Crocker

The special issue emerges from the interdisciplinary research project Disability before disability (Icel. Fötlun fyrir tíma fötlunar) situated at the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Iceland, initiated in 2017, and supported by the Icelandic Research fund (Icel. Rannsóknasjóður) Grant of Excellence No 173655-05.

Recent years have seen growing interest in the exploration of disability in premodern societies and cultures. In line with the now commonly accepted (working) premise that disability is a multi-factorial phenomenon, scholars have come to realise that there can be no fixed, atemporal or acultural definition of disability. Thus, in order to consider whether and how premodern societies may have conceptualized disability, scholars must shed presentist preconceptions, cast a wide net, and be prepared to read between the lines. Equipped with an understanding of disability as a tool of sociocultural analysis, scholars today commonly make use of the concepts of ‘embodied difference’ and ‘marked or unusual bodies’ to yield more fruitful results as they do not imply pre-defined notions of disability. Although the body becomes a central platform on whose basis disability is negotiated, scholars are in no way limited to speaking only of the physicality of bodies. Rather the body is understood as a medium which materialises and translates physical, psychic, and intellectual differences in a way that societies can identify them as deviations from what is considered ‘normal’ in specific historical and socio-cultural contexts. Indeed, the phenomenon of disability cannot be studied without the contrast of what a culture or society conceptualizes as ‘ability’ and identifies as ‘normal’. The term ‘dis/ability’ can be used to express this inherent relationship and to remind us that it is not possible to understand one without recognizing the other.

Within this theoretical context, we invite proposals for essays (c. 7000 words) for a special issue of the journal Mirator that seeks to expand upon growing interest of dis/ability in the context of the medieval Nordic world. Contributors to the special issue will explore dis/ability within the context of different social arrangements and cultural conventions in the medieval Nordic world. We will especially welcome contributions that focus on close reading of specific texts (historical, legal, literary, etc.) as well as suggestions for broad, methodological approaches towards the study of dis/ability in the medieval Nordic world. Contributors will be encouraged, where possible, to expand the scope of their research to include related aspects from the fields of cultural studies, social theory, history, art, etc. In the context of the medieval Nordic world, possible topics include, but are not limited to:

  • Approaches to the experience of dis/ability (i.e. sources, methodology)
  • Dis/ability and society
  • Religion and dis/ability
  • Dis/ability and medical knowledge
  • Intersections of dis/ability with age, gender, social status, etc.
  • Dis/ability and the law
  • Narrating experiences and perceptions of dis/ability
  • Dis/ability, assistive technology, and care
  • Terminology or language of dis/ability

Contributions dealing with geographic regions in the medieval Nordic world, including Denmark, Finland, Iceland, Norway, and/or Sweden, are welcome. We hope to represent all of these regions in the special issue and are particularly eager to field proposals dealing with Danish and Finnish material.

Please send one-page essay proposals accompanied by brief author bio (c. 100 words) to annakh@hi.is by June 1, 2019. In order to achieve an expeditious production timeline, essay drafts will be due in January 2020. Please feel free to contact us with any questions or concerns you might have in the meantime.

Handicaps, malformations et infirmités dans l’Antiquité

Sous la direction de Annie Allély 

Le dossier 2 relève des disability studies : il s’attache aux corps handicapés, malformés et infirmes, avec une attention particulière pour les embryons et les enfants – un champ de recherche encore nouveau pour les époques anciennes. La réflexion porte sur le vocabulaire utilisé pour nommer la différence physique et sur l’attitude des Anciens devant le handicap, celle-ci oscillant entre le rejet, l’élimination, et l’acceptation et l’intégration. Il y a peu d’ouvrages en français sur la question du handicap pour la période de l’Antiquité, le domaine ayant d’abord été exploré par des spécialistes anglo-saxons. Pour autant, les études contenues dans le dossier viennent compléter et enrichir la production non-francophone, sans la répéter ; elles s’adressent donc aussi aux chercheurs étrangers.

Annie Allély 
Introduction : Handicaps, malformations et infirmités dans l’Antiquité 

Embryons, nouveau-nés et enfants malformés 

Véronique Dasen 
Modèles anatomiques tératologiques et cabinets de curiosités dans l’Antiquité 

Annie Allély 
Les enfants handicapés, infirmes et malformés à Rome et dans l’Empire romain pendant l’Antiquité tardive 

Jeannine Boëldieu-Trevet 
Des nouveau-nés malformés et un roi boiteux : histoires Spartiates 

Jean-Baptiste Bonnard 
L’exposition des nouveau-nés handicapés dans le monde grec, entre réalités et mythes : un point sur la question 

Le corps handicapé, malformé et infirme 

Caroline Husquin 
Fiat Lux ! Cécité et déficiences visuelles à Rome : réalités et mythologies, des ténèbres à la lumière 

Catherine Baroin 
Boiterie et boiteux dans le monde romain à l’époque classique 

Jérôme Wilgaux 
Infirmités et prêtrise en Méditerranée antique 

Yannick Muller 
Infirmité et mutilation corporelle en Grèce ancienne : le cas de la famille étymologique de πηρός 

Patricia Gaillard-Seux 
Conclusions