New text introduction on the Medieval Disability Glossary (Society for the Study of Disability in the Middle Ages)

The Introduction is the main part of this type of submission. These should be useful to both novice and expert audiences. It would be helpful to consider these introductions as possible assigned readings to undergraduate or graduate classes.

Provide a link to the edition of the text used in the introduction. If at all possible, this should be an open-access edition. In addition, provide any relevant notes on the edition and/or the original manuscript(s).

Sir Orfeo (ca. 1330)

Contributed by Joshua R. Eyler (University of Mississippi) and Emma E. Duncan (Rutgers University-Camden)

Read the text introduction here.

Send your own txt introduction here.

Draft program conference – Reconsidering Illness and Recovery in the Early Modern World Online Conference 2020 – An interdisciplinary virtual conference for the history of health, medicine and disease – org. by Rachel Clamp and Claire Turner – 18 and 19 August 2020

RECONSIDERING ILLNESS AND RECOVERY IN THE EARLY MODERN WORLD 

Funded by the Durham University Centre for Academic Development

Sponsored by Oxford University Press and Yale University Press

 

With many conferences being cancelled or postponed due to COVID-19, Rachel Clamp (Durham University) and Claire Turner (University of Leeds) have decided to hold an online interdisciplinary conference. Their aim is to provide a space for scholars at all stages of their careers to discuss and share their work with the wider academic community.

The virtual conference will bring together an interdisciplinary group of researchers to reconsider the role of health, illness, and recovery in the early modern world in light of the current crisis. These topics sit at the intersection of some of the most significant themes in early modern history and are particularly relevant today. The ways in which contemporaries interpreted, represented, monitored, controlled and ultimately recovered from illness have broad implications for the study of science, medicine, religion, art, literature and so much more.

DAY 1
Tuesday, 18th August 1-4pm (BST)


PANEL ONE: EPIDEMIC AND INFECTIOUS DISEASE 1PM – 2PM
Aaron Columbus, Birkbeck, University of London
‘For the better observing of order during this tyme of the contagious infection’: The response of parish government to plague in the suburban environs of London c.1600 – 1650
Marina Iní, University of Cambridge
Quarantine and plague prevention: lazzaretti in the early modern Mediterranean Lorna Lorna Giltrow-Shaw, University of Birmingham
‘Death…dogs them into their own houses’: The pestilential pooch in the col aborative play The Witch of Edmonton


PANEL TWO: MEDICAL ENCOUNTERS AND INTERVENTIONS 2PM – 3PM
Nat Cutter, University of Melbourne
The First Misery of Barbary: Plague, Medicine, Recovery and Death for British Expatriates in the Ottoman Maghreb, 1660 – 1710
Maggie Bell, Assistant Curator, Norton Simon Museum
Looking Exercises: Salutary Effects of Images in the Central Ward of Santa Maria del a Helen Esfandiary, King’s College London
Managing Smal pox: Elite Georgian Mothers and the Making of an English Method of Innoculation

KEYNOTE PRESENTATION 3PM – 4PM
Professor John Henderson, Birkbeck, University of London
Imagining the Great Pox in Renaissance Italy: Patients, symptoms and treatment

 

DAY 2
Wednesday, 19th August 1-3pm (BST)


PANEL THREE: IDEALS OF HEALTH AND RECOVERY 1PM – 2PM
Emma Marshall, University of York
People, Place and Power: Re-Evaluating Domestic Healthcare
Dr Ninon Dubourg, University of Paris
Disabling Consequences of Il nesses on Clerics’ Recruitment in 1459: (Re-)Inclusion of Disabled People within the Church by Pius I
Amie Bolissian Mcrae, University of Reading
‘A conservative cure in respect of Age’: The Contingent Nature of Recovery for Early Modern Ageing Patients’


KEYNOTE PRESENTATION 2PM – 3PM
Dr Hannah Newton, University of Reading
Inside the Sick Chamber: The History of Il ness in Six Objects To register to attend the conference send an email to illnessandrecovery@gmail.com by Monday 16 August or visit our website https://illnessandrecoveryconference.wordpress.com

Clik here for more information

CFP: Disability Cluster for Yearbook of Langland Studies 35 (2021) – Disability in Pierce Plowman

CFP: Disability Cluster for Yearbook of Langland Studies 35 (2021)


This special cluster will explore the representations of disability and impairment in Piers Plowman. Langland reveals the ambivalent and multifaceted attitude toward disability and impairment in the 14th century. Characters in the poem often treat disabled figures with either love or skepticism. On one hand, those who are too infirm to work are excused from the demands of labor, and are deemed worthy of charity and God’s love. On the other, there are « faitours » who readily assume the guise of impairment in order to deceive and evade the duty to work. Will himself is interrogated by Reason in the C-Text about his inability to work, and he cites his own embodied difference, being too tall, as a justification. This cluster invites essays that examine disability in Piers Plowman from a variety of methodological approaches. Are there different representations of disability across the versions of the poem? How do representations of disability in the poem intersect with legal, theological, or social concerns in the 14th century? What is the role of physical, cognitive, or sensory impairment in the poem? How can we put the poem into conversation with Disability Studies? How does a consideration of disability in Piers Plowman reorient or contribute to current work on Langland? To medieval Disability Studies?


Submissions are due to the cluster editor, Richard Godden (rgoddenl@lsu.edu), by 30 September, 2020.

CFP – Leeds 2020 – (Un)bound Bodies: New Approaches

(Un)bound Bodies: New Approaches (Les corps (non)liés)

 
 
Leeds IMC | 6th-9th July 2020
 
For decades, bodies have been a central framework for historical inquiries. No matter how much we try to distance ourselves from them, bodies remain at the centre and borders of scholarship. Medieval bodies were fluid and contradictory loci: bound and unbound, contained yet susceptible to a host of external physical and invisible forces. Bodily boundaries were paradoxically sharp, debated, and real, yet also fluid, permeable and imaginary.
 
This new strand at IMC 2020 seeks to investigate these ‘real’ and ‘imaginary’ borders of the body and to complicate and critique existing narratives of ‘bound bodies’. As such, this strand is intentionally broad in its scope and embraces innovative and interdisciplinary approaches that push back, and go beyond, established methodologies. 
 
What? Twenty-minute papers; interest in a roundtable discussion also welcome
 
Who? Scholars from all career stages, eras and geographies. ECR and Queer approaches are particularly welcome. 
 
Suggested topics include (but are not limited to): 
 
· Un-binding scholarship: innovative approaches to bodies
 
· Bodily layers: ligaments, nerves, blood, bone, flesh, clothing
 
· Bodies and the cosmos: healing, magical influences, microcosm/macrocosm
 
· Bodies in flux: sensory experience, synaesthesia, bodily passions and emotions, cross dressing
 
· Bodily interactions: homosociality, sexuality, movement, legal systems
 
Please send titles and abstracts (maximum 250 words) together with a short biography and institutional affiliation (where relevant) to Jack Ford (jack.ford.13@ucl.ac.uk) or Lauren Rozenberg (lauren.rozenberg.14@ucl.ac.ukby 15th September.
 
Please also see the attached file for the CfP poster. Anyone applying will have to bear in mind that they will need to be registered to attend the IMC and unfortunately, as a new strand, we cannot cover any registration fees or transportation costs. Further information about the IMC can be found here: https://www.imc.leeds.ac.uk/

CFP – Leeds IMC 2020 – ‘Minority and Marginalised Experiences’, organised by An Australasian Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies

 

Recent scholarship has begun to acknowledge that the focus of Medieval and Early Modern Studies has long been on the elite, male, western European experience. New movements in academia are addressing this imbalance, acknowledging that women, ethnic minorities, and other marginalised groups contributed richly to the fabric of medieval and early modern life. Ceræ aims to join this shift in focus to the experiences of minority groups, marginalised peoples, and life in non-western territories with a conference session at IMC Leeds 2020.

Topics may include but are not limited to:

  • Experiences of minority or marginalised groups
  • Writings by minority or marginalised groups
  • Literary depictions of minority or marginalised groups
  • The effacement of minority or marginalised groups
  • Marginalia
  • Experiences on the transition of a border or landscape
  • The law of minority and marginalised groups
  • Minority and marginalised cultures, beliefs, and celebrations
  • Experiences of disability and physical and mental illness

Ceræ invites submissions encompassing all aspects of the late classical, medieval, and early modern world. There are no geographical restrictions. As an interdisciplinary journal, Ceræ encourages submissions across the fields of archaeology, art history, historical ecology, literature, linguistics,  intellectual history, musicology, politics, social studies, and beyond.

Abstracts of 250 words should be sent to editorcerae@gmail.com by 1st September 2019.

Attendees are responsible for all fees and costs associated with attending the IMC, and for registering for the congress.

For further enquiries contact our Editor: editorcerae@gmail.com; or get in touch via Facebook (facebook.com/CeraeJournal) or Twitter (@CeraeJournal).

Rechercher dans OpenEdition Search

Vous allez être redirigé vers OpenEdition Search