New Book – Sara Ritchey, Sharon Strocchia (eds), Gender, Health, and Healing, 1250-1550 – Amsterdam University Press

Sara Ritchey, Sharon Strocchia (eds), Gender, Health, and Healing, 1250-1550

This path-breaking collection offers an integrative model for understanding health and healing in Europe and the Mediterranean from 1250 to 1550. By foregrounding gender as an organizing principle of healthcare, the contributors challenge traditional binaries that ahistorically separate care from cure, medicine from religion, and domestic healing from fee-for-service medical exchanges. The essays collected here illuminate previously hidden and undervalued forms of healthcare and varieties of body knowledge produced and transmitted outside the traditional settings of university, guild, and academy. They draw on non-traditional sources — vernacular regimens, oral communications, religious and legal sources, images and objects — to reveal additional locations for producing body knowledge in households, religious communities, hospices, and public markets. Emphasizing cross-confessional and multilinguistic exchange, the essays also reveal the multiple pathways for knowledge transfer in these centuries. Gender, Health, and Healing, 1250-1550 provides a synoptic view of how gender and cross-cultural exchange shaped medical theory and practice in later medieval and Renaissance societies.

Introduction – Gendering Medieval Health and Healing: New Sources, New Perspectives
Sara Ritchey and Sharon Strocchia
 
PART 1: Sources of Religious Healing
 
Caring by the Hours: The Psalter as a Gendered Health care Technology
Sara Ritchey
 
Female Saints as Agents of Female Healing: Gendered Practices and Patronage in the Cult of St. Cunigunde
Iliana Kandzha
 
PART 2: Producing and Transmitting Medical Knowledge
 
Blood, Milk and Breastbleeding: The Humoral Economy of Women’s Bodies in Late Medieval Medicine
Montserrat Cabré and Fernando Salmón
 
Care of the Breast in the Late Middle Ages: The Tractatus de Passionibus Mamillarum
Belle S. Tuten
 
Household Medicine for a Renaissance Court: Caterina Sforza’s Ricettario Reconsidered
Sheila Barker and Sharon Strocchia
 
Understanding/Controlling the Female Body in Ten Recipes: Print and the Dissemination of Medical Knowledge about Women in the Early Sixteenth Century
Julia Gruman Martins
 
PART 3: Infirmity and Care
 
Ubi non est mulier, ingemiscit egens? Gendered Perceptions of Care from the Thirteenth to Sixteenth Centuries
Eva-Maria Cersovsky
 
Domestic Care in the Sixteenth Century: Expectations, Experiences, and Practices from a Gendered Perspective
Cordula Nolte
 
Bathtubs as a Healing Approach in Fifteenth-Century Ottoman Medicine
Ayman Yasin Atat
 
PART 4: (In)fertility and Reproduction
 
Gender, Old Age, and the Infertile Body in Medieval Medicine
Catherine Rider
 
Gender Segregation and the Possibility of Arabo-Galenic Gynecological Practice in the Medieval Islamic World
Sara Verskin
 
Afterword: Healing Women and Women Healers
Naama Cohen-Hanegbi

Call for Papers: Experiencing the material body in early modern Europe – Stockholm University, October 7-9, 2020

Call for Papers: Experiencing the material body in early modern Europe

Datum: 31 mars 2020
Plats: Deadline for proposals
Call for papers to a conference held at Stockholm University, October 7-9, 2020.

 

 
Image from Hieronymus Bock, Kreutterbuch, courtesy of the The Hagströmer Medico-Historical Library.

Key-note speakers

Sasha Handley (Manchester)
Craig Koslofsky (Illinois)
Maren Lorenz (Ruhr Universität Bochum)

In the early modern world, society, monarchy and the family were understood in the form of corporeal metaphors. The body was also the site of conflicts over life and death, sin and redemption, and the object of severe punishment and domination. Simultaneously, the period saw rapid change: the European expansion heightened tensions over the body and its transformation in relation to foreign lands, foods and peoples. Mechanical conceptions of the body as a tool governed by the mind, and insistence on the senses as the prime source of knowledge emerged in scientific research and reached a broader audience. Within this context, the body in early modernity is oftentimes described as porous, malleable and in flux. Climate, food, objects, and social interaction are all described as having had corporeal effects, from the changing of skin tones, the movement of bodily fluids, to the honing of performance to suit social and gender roles. From wherever we look, it seems that early modern people’s bodies were under significant pressure from outward influences, as well as from their own ambitions to control them. Using approaches like embodiment, performance, sensory and cognitive history, history of emotions, material culture and history of medicine, scholars have investigated various forms of corporeal experience. This workshop seeks to bring together these interlinked fields in order to reflect upon the lived-in body in early modern Europe.

We aim to draw together research from various fields to consider the status of the material body in relation to its surroundings, to gauge the significance of the various ways it was influenced externally and internally, and to better understand how early modern people of different gender, class, creed and ethnicity understood bodies to work. The workshop will engage with the body within a wide range of contexts, from the profound relationships between the macro- and microcosms, to everyday experience like work, eating and sex. We will consider the body as willed and cultivated, but also highlight the body’s vulnerabilities and propensity to sometimes do unforeseen things.

Information

Abstracts of circa 250 words are invited for papers of 20 minutes to be delivered at the workshop in  Stockholm. Send together with short CV to:  matbod@historia.su.se

Deadline for proposals: March 31, 2020.

All costs for travel and accommodation will be covered for presenters.

For more information, contact Karin Sennefelt, karin.sennefelt@historia.su.se.

Organizers

The workshop is organized by the project The Word made Flesh: The Body in Lutheran Culture, 1600-1750 at the Department of History, Stockholm University and funded by the Swedish Research Council and Riksbankens Jubileumsfond.

More information on the organisator website.

Conference – Monash Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies Sixth Annual Symposium – Salutaria! Perspectives on Health and Wellbeing in Medieval and Early Modern History – Friday 24th April 2020

Salutaria! Perspectives on Health and Wellbeing in Medieval and Early Modern History

 

The preservation of health and the pursuit of wellness were major preoccupations during the Medieval and Renaissance period. This was not limited to just the body but also to the mind, the soul, the community and the environment. As a complex subject that affected everybody, the quest for wellbeing was understood and experienced in a multitude of ways. This symposium aims to explore both the changing and continuing perceptions of wellbeing during the medieval and early modern period as well as the various strategies people employed to pursue it for themselves and for others.

Time: 9:00 am to 5:00 pm

Date: Friday 24th April 2020

Location: Monash Club, 32 Exhibition Walk, Monash University, Clayton Campus

 

Keynote Speaker

Professor Guy Geltner (Monash University)
“Health and the Environment Beyond the Simplex of the Pre”

Speakers

Dr Michael Barbezat (The Institute for Religion and Critical Inquiry, Australian Catholic University)

Elizabeth Burrell (Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, Monash University)

Dr Merav Carmeli (Australian Centre for Jewish Civilisation, Monash University)

Nat Cutter (School of Historical and Philosophical Studies, University of Melbourne)

Jacqueline Mahoney (School of Philosophical, Historical and International Studies, Monash University)

Dr Melissa Raine (School of Historical and Philosophical Studies, University of Melbourne)

Dr Kathryn Smithies (School of Historical and Philosophical Studies, University of Melbourne)

Dr Richard Tait (Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, Monash University)

Gordon Whyte (Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University)

 

More info on the Monash website.

New books – A Cultural History of Disability (6 volumes), ed. by David Bolt, Robert McRuer – Bloomsbury publ.

About A Cultural History of Disability

How has our understanding and treatment of disability evolved in Western culture? How has it been represented and perceived in different social and cultural conditions?

In a work that spans 2,500 years, these ambitious questions are addressed by over 50 experts, each contributing their overview of a theme applied to a period in history. The volumes describe different kinds of physical and mental disabilities, their representations and receptions, and what impact they have had on society and everyday life.

Individual volume editors ensure the cohesion of the whole, and to make it as easy as possible to use, chapter titles are identical across each of the volumes. This gives the choice of reading about a specific period in one of the volumes, or following a theme across history by reading the relevant chapter in each of the six.

The six volumes cover1. – Antiquity (500 BCE – 500 CE); 2. – Middle Ages (500 – 1450); 3. – Renaissance (1400 – 1650) ; 4. – Long Eighteenth Century (1650 – 1800); 5. – Long Nineteenth Century (1800 – 1920); 6. – Modern Age (1920 – 2000+).

Themes (and chapter titles) are: atypical bodies; mobility impairment; chronic pain and illness; blindness; deafness; speech; learning difficulties; mental health.

The page extent is approximately 2,000pp with c. 200 illustrations. Each volume opens with Notes on Contributors, a series preface and an introduction, and concludes with Notes, Bibliography and an Index.

Table of contents

Volume 1: A Cultural History of Disability in Antiquity, edited by Christian Laes (University of Manchester, UK)
Volume 2: A Cultural History of Disability in the Middle Ages, edited by Jonathan Hsy (George Washington University, USA), Tory V. Pearman (Miami University, Hamilton, Ohio, USA) and Joshua R. Eyler (Rice University, USA)
Volume 3: A Cultural History of Disability in the Renaissance, edited by Susan Anderson (Sheffield Hallam University, UK) and Liam Haydon (United Kingdom Research and Innovation, UK)
Volume 4: A Cultural History of Disability in the Long Eighteenth Century, edited by D. Christopher Gabbard (University of North Florida, USA) and Susannah B. Mintz (Skidmore College, USA)
Volume 5: A Cultural History of Disability in the Long Nineteenth Century, edited by Joyce Huff (Ball State University, USA) and Martha Stoddard Holmes (California State University San Marcos, USA)
Volume 6: A Cultural History of Disability in the Modern Age, edited by David T. Mitchell (George Washington University, USA) and Sharon L. Snyder (George Washington University, USA)

More infos on the editor’s website

« Monsters and problematic identities » – graduate student conference – The Medieval and Renaissance Student Association (MaRSA) of California State University, Long Beach

MONSTERS AND PROBLEMATIC IDENTITIES


The Medieval and Renaissance Student Association (MaRSA) of California State University, Long Beach is seeking individual papers as well as panel submissions for their graduate student conference.

The conference will be held at the Karl Anatol Center on the campus of CSULB on March I2th, 2020. Medieval and Renaissance monstrosity and identities. As an interdisciplinary conference, we welcome submissions from a wide array of disciplines focusing on the art, literature, and history of the period. Paper and panel topics might address issues (but are not limited to) the following:
Monsters es the other (theories of otherness)

Eco-critIcism and Monsters

Nationalism and Monsters

Identity formation

  • Gender
  • Race
  • Sexuality
  • Religious identity

Psychoanalysis (historical actors)

Post/Modern

Medievalism Fantasy Monsters

  • Zombies
  • Ghosts
  • Dragons
  • Fairies
  • Demons
  • Giants
  • Ogres
  • Werewolves (shapeshifters)
  • Dwarves

Cultural/Social Isolation (outlaw)/ Marginalization

Travel Literature, and Monsters

Colonialism/ Imperialism Trans-AtiaMic

Disabilities (dwarves)

Medieval Imaginary

Monstrous Bodies

Witchcraft (magic)

Ideological Appropriation

 

PRESENTATIONS SHOULD RUN FOR APPROXIMATELY 15 MINUTES. PLEASE SUBMIT ABSTRACTS OF NO MORE THAN 300 WORDS ALONG WITH A CURRENT 1 PAGE CV BY EMAIL TO MEDREN.CSULB@GMAIL.COM BY FEBRUARY 6TH, 2020.

 

 

Rechercher dans OpenEdition Search

Vous allez être redirigé vers OpenEdition Search