Workshop – Power, Piety and Plague: the Northern Church in the 14th Century, by Medieval Studies Research Group, Lincoln – 22 April

About this Event

The Medieval Studies Research Group (University of Lincoln), The Northern Way, and the Lincoln Record Society invite you to join us for this free, interactive workshop. No experience necessary.

This workshop will explore some of the riches contained within the Registers that were used to record the business of the Archbishops’ of York in the fourteenth century, an era of political turmoil, almost incessant warfare and climatic and public health catastrophes.

‘“The Northern Way”: the Archbishops of York and the North of England, 1304 – 1405’ is an Arts and Humanities Research Council funded research project run by the Borthwick Institute for Archives, University of York, in partnership with The National Archives (TNA). ‘The Northern Way’ seeks to make the content from the 16 Registers for this period, alongside related documents from TNA, more easily searchable and accessible through the development of a digital resource. The workshop will demonstrate how the resource and index can shed light on a range of topics and previously hidden histories about, principally, the North of England but also about the employment and influence of clerks from Lincolnshire in running the diocese of York and the government of England.

You will find out more about Archbishop Melton’s reaction to the, now notorious, Joan of Leeds, a nun from the Priory of St Clements, York. In 1318, with the help of her fellow nuns, Joan faked her own death and buried a dummy of her body, so that she could run away to Beverley and allegedly live a life of ‘carnal lust’. These Registers can provide insights into the religious and political role of the province and its relationship with central government, as well as give fascinating insights into culture, society and piety.

Dr Paul Dryburgh and Dr Marianne Wilson (The Northern Way and Lincoln Record Society)

Link to register

Seminar – Uncommon Bodies – « The Trajectories of Early Modern Disability Studies » ; Simone Chess, “Hacking Sex in the Renaissance.” Lindsey Row-Heyveld, “Careless Arden: Able-bodiedness in As You Like It.” – 10-12 Feb 2021 – Event Free on Zoom

 
Uncommon Bodies: CSPW/CEMH Event
 
Please join us for two Uncommon Bodies events on disability studies and early modern sexuality, featuring Lindsey Row-Heyveld and Simone Chess


If you’re thinking you that you may come, we would like to know! Even if you ultimately can’t make it, we want to ensure that accommodations are available for you. So please RSVP.

When: Wed. Feb. 10, 2021 — Behind-the-scenes methods talk (11AM-12:30 PM CST)
and Friday, Feb. 12, 2021 Double header! (12- 1:30 PM CST)
Where: Zoom (please RSVP for link or check on the Center for Early Modern History UMN site)
Who: This event is free and open to the public, and to anyone who might be interested in disability studies, disability community, and early modern scholarship

Feb 10:
« The Trajectories of Early Modern Disability Studies »
Topics include: what brought us each to early modern disability studies? Where was early modern disability studies when we first met and first began this work? What has changed, in the field and in our own thinking? Where do we see gaps or space for growth? How did we pick the topics we’ll be talking about as models for what might be coming next in the field?


Feb. 12:
These talks approach the question of what might come next in early modern disability studies from two very different angles: Lindsey Row-Heyveld’s work on able-bodiedness and inattention explores a disability studies that could help us understand the construction of normalcy, modeling ways that disability knowledges apply broadly outside of the usual canon of early modern disability texts, while Simone Chess’s work on adaptive sex practices experiments with a disability studies centered in embodiment, modeling an increased specificity about disabled practices in history. Despite these very different approaches, the papers dovetail in their shared commitment to envisioning a capacious, creative, and multi-vocal future for early modern disability studies.

Simone Chess, “Hacking Sex in the Renaissance.”
Lindsey Row-Heyveld, “Careless Arden: Able-bodiedness in As You Like It.”
 
 

New book – Exceptional Bodies in Early Modern Culture: Concepts of Monstrosity Before the Advent of the Normal, ed. by Maja Bondestam, pub. by Amsterdam University Press

Exceptional Bodies in Early Modern Culture, Concepts of Monstrosity Before the Advent of the Normal

Maja Bondestam (ed.), published by Amsterdam University Press, new series Monsters and Marvels. Alterity in the Medieval and Early Modern Worlds

 

Drawing on a rich array of textual and visual primary sources, including medicine, satires, play scripts, dictionaries, natural philosophy, and texts on collecting wonders, this book provides a fresh perspective on monstrosity in early modern European culture. The essays explore how exceptional bodies challenged social, religious, sexual and natural structures and hierarchies in the sixteenth, seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries and contributed to its knowledge, moral and emotional repertoire. Prodigious births, maternal imagination, hermaphrodites, collections of extraordinary things, powerful women, disabilities, controversial exercise, shapeshifting phenomena and hybrids are examined in a period before all varieties and differences became normalized to a homogenous standard. The historicizing of exceptional bodies is central in the volume since it expands our understanding of early modern culture and deepens our knowledge of its specific ways of conceptualizing singularities, rare examples, paradoxes, rules and conventions in nature and society.

 

Table of contents

Introduction – Maja Bondestam

1. The Moresca Dance in Counter-Reformation Rome: Court Medicine and the Moderation of Exceptional Bodies – Maria Kavvadia

2. Monsters and the Matemal Imagination: The ‘First Vision’ from Johann Remmelin’s 1619 Catoptrum microcosmicum Triptych – Rosemary Moore

3. The Optics of Bodily Deviance: Juan Ruiz de Alarcon’s Path to Public Office – Pablo Garcia Pillar

4. ‘The Most Deformed Woman in France’: Marguerite de Valois’s Monstrous Sexuality in the Divorce satyrique – Cecile Resfels

5. Curious, Useful and Important: Bayle’s ‘Hermaphrodites’ as Figures of Theological Inquiry – Parker Cotton

6. An Education: Johannes Schefferus and the Prodigious Son of a Fisherman – Maja Bondestam


7. Ambiguous and Transitional Bodies: Stillbirth in Stockholm, 1691-1724 – Tove Paulsson Holmberg


Afterword – Kathleen Long

 
 

New Book – Sara Ritchey, Sharon Strocchia (eds), Gender, Health, and Healing, 1250-1550 – Amsterdam University Press

Sara Ritchey, Sharon Strocchia (eds), Gender, Health, and Healing, 1250-1550

This path-breaking collection offers an integrative model for understanding health and healing in Europe and the Mediterranean from 1250 to 1550. By foregrounding gender as an organizing principle of healthcare, the contributors challenge traditional binaries that ahistorically separate care from cure, medicine from religion, and domestic healing from fee-for-service medical exchanges. The essays collected here illuminate previously hidden and undervalued forms of healthcare and varieties of body knowledge produced and transmitted outside the traditional settings of university, guild, and academy. They draw on non-traditional sources — vernacular regimens, oral communications, religious and legal sources, images and objects — to reveal additional locations for producing body knowledge in households, religious communities, hospices, and public markets. Emphasizing cross-confessional and multilinguistic exchange, the essays also reveal the multiple pathways for knowledge transfer in these centuries. Gender, Health, and Healing, 1250-1550 provides a synoptic view of how gender and cross-cultural exchange shaped medical theory and practice in later medieval and Renaissance societies.

Introduction – Gendering Medieval Health and Healing: New Sources, New Perspectives
Sara Ritchey and Sharon Strocchia
 
PART 1: Sources of Religious Healing
 
Caring by the Hours: The Psalter as a Gendered Health care Technology
Sara Ritchey
 
Female Saints as Agents of Female Healing: Gendered Practices and Patronage in the Cult of St. Cunigunde
Iliana Kandzha
 
PART 2: Producing and Transmitting Medical Knowledge
 
Blood, Milk and Breastbleeding: The Humoral Economy of Women’s Bodies in Late Medieval Medicine
Montserrat Cabré and Fernando Salmón
 
Care of the Breast in the Late Middle Ages: The Tractatus de Passionibus Mamillarum
Belle S. Tuten
 
Household Medicine for a Renaissance Court: Caterina Sforza’s Ricettario Reconsidered
Sheila Barker and Sharon Strocchia
 
Understanding/Controlling the Female Body in Ten Recipes: Print and the Dissemination of Medical Knowledge about Women in the Early Sixteenth Century
Julia Gruman Martins
 
PART 3: Infirmity and Care
 
Ubi non est mulier, ingemiscit egens? Gendered Perceptions of Care from the Thirteenth to Sixteenth Centuries
Eva-Maria Cersovsky
 
Domestic Care in the Sixteenth Century: Expectations, Experiences, and Practices from a Gendered Perspective
Cordula Nolte
 
Bathtubs as a Healing Approach in Fifteenth-Century Ottoman Medicine
Ayman Yasin Atat
 
PART 4: (In)fertility and Reproduction
 
Gender, Old Age, and the Infertile Body in Medieval Medicine
Catherine Rider
 
Gender Segregation and the Possibility of Arabo-Galenic Gynecological Practice in the Medieval Islamic World
Sara Verskin
 
Afterword: Healing Women and Women Healers
Naama Cohen-Hanegbi

Call for Papers: Experiencing the material body in early modern Europe – Stockholm University, October 7-9, 2020

Call for Papers: Experiencing the material body in early modern Europe

Datum: 31 mars 2020
Plats: Deadline for proposals
Call for papers to a conference held at Stockholm University, October 7-9, 2020.

 

 
Image from Hieronymus Bock, Kreutterbuch, courtesy of the The Hagströmer Medico-Historical Library.

Key-note speakers

Sasha Handley (Manchester)
Craig Koslofsky (Illinois)
Maren Lorenz (Ruhr Universität Bochum)

In the early modern world, society, monarchy and the family were understood in the form of corporeal metaphors. The body was also the site of conflicts over life and death, sin and redemption, and the object of severe punishment and domination. Simultaneously, the period saw rapid change: the European expansion heightened tensions over the body and its transformation in relation to foreign lands, foods and peoples. Mechanical conceptions of the body as a tool governed by the mind, and insistence on the senses as the prime source of knowledge emerged in scientific research and reached a broader audience. Within this context, the body in early modernity is oftentimes described as porous, malleable and in flux. Climate, food, objects, and social interaction are all described as having had corporeal effects, from the changing of skin tones, the movement of bodily fluids, to the honing of performance to suit social and gender roles. From wherever we look, it seems that early modern people’s bodies were under significant pressure from outward influences, as well as from their own ambitions to control them. Using approaches like embodiment, performance, sensory and cognitive history, history of emotions, material culture and history of medicine, scholars have investigated various forms of corporeal experience. This workshop seeks to bring together these interlinked fields in order to reflect upon the lived-in body in early modern Europe.

We aim to draw together research from various fields to consider the status of the material body in relation to its surroundings, to gauge the significance of the various ways it was influenced externally and internally, and to better understand how early modern people of different gender, class, creed and ethnicity understood bodies to work. The workshop will engage with the body within a wide range of contexts, from the profound relationships between the macro- and microcosms, to everyday experience like work, eating and sex. We will consider the body as willed and cultivated, but also highlight the body’s vulnerabilities and propensity to sometimes do unforeseen things.

Information

Abstracts of circa 250 words are invited for papers of 20 minutes to be delivered at the workshop in  Stockholm. Send together with short CV to:  matbod@historia.su.se

Deadline for proposals: March 31, 2020.

All costs for travel and accommodation will be covered for presenters.

For more information, contact Karin Sennefelt, karin.sennefelt@historia.su.se.

Organizers

The workshop is organized by the project The Word made Flesh: The Body in Lutheran Culture, 1600-1750 at the Department of History, Stockholm University and funded by the Swedish Research Council and Riksbankens Jubileumsfond.

More information on the organisator website.

Rechercher dans OpenEdition Search

Vous allez être redirigé vers OpenEdition Search