Sessions on health, illness and disability history in kalamazoo 2022!

Carreful : time GMT +2 (Paris summer time)

Monday, May 9, 2022

 

Live Recorded: No

Sponsored By: Societas Magica

    Description
    Magic is hard to define, control, and censure. The use and study of magic overlaps and intersects with various disciplines, practices, and geographical locations. This panel has papers that explore the places where these cross-currents occur in inquisitorial, medicinal, legal, and literary miracles.
     
    Papers

     

    Live Recorded: Yes

    Sponsored By: Society for the Study of Disability in the Middle Ages

      Tuesday, May 10, 2022

       

      Live Recorded: Yes

      Sponsored By: Manuscript Technologies Forum Interest Group, The English Association

        Papers

        5:00 PM – 6:30 PM

         

        Live Recorded: Yes

        Sponsored By: Medieval Romance Society

         

        Live Recorded: No

        Sponsored By: John Gower Society

        Papers

         

        Live Recorded: No

        Sponsored By: Medieval Makars Society

           

          Live Recorded: Yes

          Sponsored By: Manuscript Technologies Forum Interest Group, The English Association

             

            Live Recorded: Yes

            Sponsored By: Medica: The Society for the Study of Healing in the Middle Ages

              11:00 PM – 12:30 AM 

               

              Live Recorded: Yes

                  Papers
                   

                  Live Recorded: Yes

                  Sponsored By: Italians and Italianists at Kalamazoo

                  Wednesday, May 11, 2022

                   

                  Live Recorded: Yes

                  Sponsored By: Medieval Association of the Midwest (MAM)

                     

                    Live Recorded: Yes

                    Sponsored By: International Courtly Literature Society (ICLS), North American Branch

                     

                     

                     

                    Live Recorded: Yes

                    Sponsored By: International Courtly Literature Society (ICLS), North American Branch

                      Friday, May 13, 2022

                       

                      Live Recorded: Yes

                      Sponsored By: Society for the Study of Disability in the Middle Ages

                         

                        Live Recorded: Yes

                         

                        Live Recorded: No

                        Sponsored By: Medieval Association for Rural Studies (MARS)

                           

                          Live Recorded: Yes

                              Saturday, May 14, 2022

                               

                              Live Recorded: Yes

                                   

                                  Live Recorded: No

                                      CFP: Disability Cluster for Yearbook of Langland Studies 35 (2021) – Disability in Pierce Plowman

                                      CFP: Disability Cluster for Yearbook of Langland Studies 35 (2021)


                                      This special cluster will explore the representations of disability and impairment in Piers Plowman. Langland reveals the ambivalent and multifaceted attitude toward disability and impairment in the 14th century. Characters in the poem often treat disabled figures with either love or skepticism. On one hand, those who are too infirm to work are excused from the demands of labor, and are deemed worthy of charity and God’s love. On the other, there are “faitours” who readily assume the guise of impairment in order to deceive and evade the duty to work. Will himself is interrogated by Reason in the C-Text about his inability to work, and he cites his own embodied difference, being too tall, as a justification. This cluster invites essays that examine disability in Piers Plowman from a variety of methodological approaches. Are there different representations of disability across the versions of the poem? How do representations of disability in the poem intersect with legal, theological, or social concerns in the 14th century? What is the role of physical, cognitive, or sensory impairment in the poem? How can we put the poem into conversation with Disability Studies? How does a consideration of disability in Piers Plowman reorient or contribute to current work on Langland? To medieval Disability Studies?


                                      Submissions are due to the cluster editor, Richard Godden (rgoddenl@lsu.edu), by 30 September, 2020.

                                      CFP – Experiences of Dis/ability from the Late Middle Ages to the Mid-Twentieth Century 22 – 23 August 2019, Tampere University, Finland

                                      Keynote speakers: David Lederer, Maynooth University; Donna Trembinski, St. Francis Xavier University; David Turner, Swansea University

                                      In recent decades, dis/ability history has become an important field in its own right, standing at the crossroads of the social history of medicine, the history of minorities and the history of everyday life. Conceptions of and attitudes to physical and mental wellbeing and to difference are and have always been key elements in any human society, while the lived experience of dis/ability has varied across societies and time periods, but also depending on the person’s socioeconomic status, age, gender, and the nature of the impairment. Experiences of disability, whether personal or communal, have long continuities in the past, but they have also changed dramatically with the development of medical science and institutionalized care.

                                      This conference aims to concentrate on the experiences of those with physical or mental impairments and chronic illnesses, with special reference to the period between the late Middle Ages and the mid-twentieth century. We understand dis/ability in a broad sense, covering a wide range of physical, mental and intellectual impairments and chronic illnesses. How, then, were various dis/abilities lived and experienced, how did communities shape these experiences, and what similarities and changes can we detect over the course of time? An important viewpoint is also that of methodology: how can a modern scholar approach the experience of those living in the past?

                                      We thus invite papers that explore the ways in which ‘disabilities’ have been lived and experienced, in all stages of life, and by people of different social status and background. The conference aims to promote dialogue between disability historians across national and chronological borders and we welcome papers presenting new research and work in progress.

                                      Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

                                      • How to approach the experience of dis/ability (sources, methodology)?
                                      • Different categories of dis/ability experience, or what counts as experience of disability?
                                      • How have society, religion and practices of care and cure defined the experience of disability?
                                      • Lived religion and dis/ability
                                      • Medicalization, institutionalization and everyday life
                                      • The impact of gender, age and social status on the experience of dis/ability
                                      • Lived welfare and everyday experiences of people with disabilities, e.g. living at home, in a workhouse or mental institution, the impact of various welfare systems.

                                      To submit a proposal, please send title and abstract of 200 words, with your contact information and affiliation by February 15, 2019, at https://www.lyyti.in/disabilityexperience2019_callforpapers

                                      Conference website: https://events.uta.fi/disabilityexperience2019/

                                      Participation is free of charge, and includes lunches and coffees for speakers.

                                      The conference is organized by the Academy of Finland Centre of Excellence in the History of Experiences (HEX, https://research.uta.fi/hex/) at the University of Tampere and the group “Lived Religion” and has received funding from The Jenny and Antti Wihuri Foundation (https://wihurinrahasto.fi/?lang=en) and HEX. For more information, please write to the organizers (jenni.kuuliala@uta.fi and riikka.miettinen@uta.fi)

                                      CFP – “Re-defining the Monster” – ICMS Kalamazoo 2019

                                      CFP for ICMS Kalamazoo 2019: Re-defining the Monster

                                      The proposed session will discuss and debate on the various definitions of the concept of the “monster.” Defining the monster is a challenge. Monsters and monstrosity-related aspects have been topics of academic research either connected to identity or cross-cultural encounters, explored as ‘others’ in the context of voyages (real-imagined), as heritage from Antiquity, as races reflected in travellers’ reports inserted into Western art, philosophy, and theology.

                                      What is a monster? What is monstrosity? How is the monster conceptualized by a given community? Can one define it or does the monster define itself? Does it offer any self-description? Did the medieval man write about monsters and how does this define the monster from a cultural perspective? Where and what is the “border” between human, “other,” and monster? This session seeks original research which investigates medieval scholarly debates in philosophical, theological, political, literary, visual contexts and/or sources in order to (re)define the concept of the monster/monstrosity. Reinterpretations of previous definitions are welcome in a debate on re-visualizing medieval monsters.

                                      This sessions also aims to bring the intellectual outcome of these sessions into the attention of the general public by publishing the proceedings of the debates in the series “picturing the Middle Ages and Ealry Modernity” at Trivent Publishing, Budapest, Hungary.

                                      Please submitt a 250-word proposal for a 15-20 minutes paper presentation by september 15th, 2018.

                                       

                                      Contact information :

                                      Andrea-Bianka Znorovszky, Ca’Foscari university, Venice, Italy (andrea.znorovszky@unive.it)

                                      Theodora C. Artimon, Trivent Publishing, Budapest, Hungary

                                       

                                      CFP – IMCS Kalamazoo 2019 – The Society for the Study of Disability in the Middle Ages propose 3 themes: Medieval Disability and Pedagogy – Intersections of Race and Disability in the Global Middle Ages – Disability and Public Scholarship.

                                      The Society for the Study of Disability in the Middle Ages Invites Proposals for the International Congress on Medieval StudiesMay 9-12 2019, Kalamazoo, MI

                                       

                                      Medieval Disability and Pedagogy (a roundtable)

                                      Contributors will discuss the ways in which disability has informed approaches to instruction, how to unite disability pedagogy and scholarship, possible texts for inclusion in the classroom, and selected assignments and activities that involve the medieval disability perspective. Participants will share practical ideas for effective activities, assignments, and readings.

                                       

                                      Intersections of Race and Disability in the Global Middle Ages (a session of papers)

                                      In this session, contributors will offer papers that explore the intersections between race and disability in the Middle Ages. We particularly seek approaches that consider non-Western, inter-disciplinary perspectives.

                                       

                                      Disability and Public Scholarship (a session of papers)

                                      In this session, participants will discuss the responsibilities of medieval disability studies to engage in public scholarship, how we can share our own public scholarship, and the ways that we as medieval disability studies scholars can be more active in public scholarship in order to support the value of our research.

                                      Please send 250-word abstracts along with completed Participant Information Form to Tory Pearman at pearmatv@miamioh.edu by September 15.

                                      Because medieval disability studies should pursue inclusive and intersectional scholarship, the SSDMA is committed to including perspectives representative of the diversity of the field and to amplifying voices that are too often marginalized by systemic discrimination in academic employment, publishing, funding, and conference programming

                                       

                                      More infos on the organisator’s website !