Archives par mot-clé : 500-1500

CFP – Skin in Medieval and Early Modern Worlds – Perth Medieval and Renaissance Group/UWA Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies Annual Conference

Skin in Medieval and Early Modern Worlds

Perth Medieval and Renaissance Group/UWA Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies Annual Conference

13 October 2018

From the organisators website :

Keynote Speaker: Dr Lisa Beaven (La Trobe University), ‘Living Flesh: Splendor, Sex and Sickness on the Surface of the Skin’.

Skin as a material served a vital role in premodern economies. It was an essential ingredient in clothing and tools, and it formed the primary material for the manuscripts on which knowledge and ideas were recorded and preserved. Beyond the many uses for the skins of animals, the idea of skin interested artists, scholars, and theologians. As a boundary or surface, skin presented a range of symbolic possibilities. Images of skin, such as its piercing, often acted as metaphors for the uncovering of secrets or the interpretation of allegory. Premodern observers, likewise, often believed that the appearance and colour of an individual’s skin indicated truths about their inner nature. Diseases of the skin, such as leprosy, attracted legislation and intellectual speculation, drawing together the immaterial world of ideas regarding skin and the treatment of actual human skins.

We are interested in papers that address the many premodern uses of skin, as well representations of and ideas about skin. This conference is multidisciplinary and wide-ranging; we welcome papers from the fields of book culture and manuscript studies, history, material culture, medicine, disability studies, race studies, crime and punishment, art, literature, and theology.

The conference organisers invite proposals for 20-minute papers.

Please send a paper title, 250-word abstract, and a short (no more than 100-word) biography to pmrg.cmems.conference@gmail.com by 31 May 2018.

 

 

More infos on the organisators website.

New book – Trauma in Medieval Society – by Wendy J. Turner and Christina Lee

Trauma in Medieval Society

Series: Explorations in Medieval Culture, Volume: 7

 

 

Submary from the editor website:

Trauma in Medieval Society is an edited collection of articles from a variety of scholars on the history of trauma and the traumatised in medieval Europe. Looking at trauma as a theoretical concept, as part of the literary and historical lives of medieval individuals and communities, this volume brings together scholars from the fields of archaeology, anthropology, history, literature, religion, and languages. The collection offers insights into the physical impairments from and psychological responses to injury, shock, war, or other violence—either corporeal or mental. From biographical to socio-cultural analyses, these articles examine skeletal and archival evidence as well as literary substantiation of trauma as lived experience in the Middle Ages.

Contributors are Carla L. Burrell, Sara M. Canavan, Susan L. Einbinder, Michael M. Emery, Bianca Frohne, Ronald J. Ganze, Helen Hickey, Sonja Kerth, Jenni Kuuliala, Christina Lee, Kate McGrath, Charles-Louis Morand Métivier, James C. Ohman, Walton O. Schalick, III, Sally Shockro, Patricia Skinner, Donna Trembinski, Wendy J. Turner, Belle S. Tuten, Anne Van Arsdall, and Marit van Cant.

More info on the editor website.

Corps hybrides aux frontières de l’humain au Moyen Âge – Université catholique de Louvain, 19-20 avril 2018

Corps hybrides aux frontières de l’humain au Moyen Âge

Colloque international (Université catholique de Louvain, 19-20 avril 2018)

 

 

Programme

Jeudi 19 avril 2018

14h

Accueil des participants

14h30
Séance I / Imaginer la frontière de l’humain : entre texte et enluminure

Christine Ferlampin-Acher
(U. de Rennes II)
Le monstre Malegrape dans Artus de Bretagne (§§ 108 ss.) entre textes et images

Damien Kempf (U. of Liverpool)
Monstrous Tales, Monstrous Beasts : Saracens as Hybrids

András Borgó (U. Innsbruck)
Hybrid Bodies in Hebrew Manuscript Illuminations

16h

Pause café

16h30
Séance II / Narrations monstrueuses : fantaisie du soi et de l’autre

Miranda Griffin (U. of Cambridge)
Mélusine and Margaret : Assemblages and Monstrous Maternity

Jessy Simonini (ENS, Paris)
Cors, bras et chiere aveit semblant as noz: images du centaure dans le Roman de Troie

Antonella Sciancalepore
(UCLouvain)
Chevaliers-poisson et enfants-arbalète: recherches sur les hybridations humain-inorganique

Vendredi 20 avril 2018

9h15

Accueil

9h30

Séance III / Encadrer le monstre : la science face à l’hybride

Pierre-Olivier Dittmar (EHESS, Paris)
Le Monstres des hommes

Catherine Megan Crossley (U. of Liverpool)
Human or Hybrid? Medieval Monstrous Men and the Question of the Soul

10h30

Pause café

11h

Séance IV / Lost in time : les transformations de l’hybride

Jacqueline Leclercq-Marx (ULB, Bruxelles)
Une frontière très mouvante. L’humanisation du monstrueux dans le haut Moyen Âge et le Moyen Âge central

Grégory Clesse – Florence Ninitte (UCLouvain – U. zu Köln)
Pérégrinations des peuples hybrides dans les histoires et géographies de l’Orient

Clémence Gauche (U. de Nantes)
Identité aux frontières de l’humain : monstres et hybrides dans les sceaux de la fin du Moyen-Âge (XIIe-XVIe siècles)

 

13h45

Séance V / Table ronde conclusive

Modérée par Cristina Noacco (U. de Toulouse II) et Antonella Sciancalepore

 

More infos on the UCLouvain website.

Medieval Medicine – London Medieval Society Colloquium – 5th May 2018 – London

Medieval Medicine –
London Medieval Society Colloquium
Saturday 5th May 2018,


Join us to explore medieval medicine at this one day colloquium with papers ranging from medical expertise and remedies in England and Normandy and the dissemination of Arabic and Persian medical works in Byzantium to the mapping the medieval brain and the origins of public health. Guest speakers include Alison Hudson (British Library), Elma Brenner (Wellcome Institute), Petros Bouras-Vallianatos (King’s College London), Bill MacLehose (UCL) and Peregrine Horden (Royal Holloway). A wine reception which will immediately follow the colloquium.


Programme:
10.45 Registration
11.00 ‘Feeling no Pain? Remedies and Rhetoric in England c.1000’,
Alison Hudson (British Library).
11.45 ‘Medical Expertise in Medieval Normandy’,
Elma Brenner (Wellcome Institute)
12.30 Lunch
1.30 ‘The Dissemination of Arabic and Persian Medical Works in Byzantium’,
Petros Bouras-Vallianatos (King’s College London)
2.15 ‘The Normal and the Pathological: Mapping the Brain in Medieval Medicine’,
Bill MacLehose (UCL)
3.00 Coffee
3.30 ‘The Origins of European Public Health?’
Peregrine Horden (Royal Holloway)
4.15 Round Table (Chair: Daniel McCann, Lincoln College, Oxford)
5.00 Wine Reception
Information:
Find about more on the london medieval society website:

Disability in Latin Medieval Philosophy and Theology Disability in Latin Medieval Philosophy and Theology conference – April 26–28, 2018 – Notre Dame University

Disability in Latin Medieval Philosophy and Theology Disability in Latin Medieval Philosophy and Theology conference

April 26–28, 2018

McKenna Hall Notre Dame Conference Center

Programme :

Organizers:     Prof. Richard Cross (richard.cross@nd.edu)

Prof. Scott M. Williams (swillia8@unca.edu)

 

Thursday, April 26th, 2018

3:00-3:30pm    Coffee & Snacks

 

3:30-4:50pm  –  Kevin Timpe, “Thomas Aquinas on Disability” (Calvin College)

Chair: Christina van Dyke (Calvin College)

Commentator: Richard Cross (University of Notre Dame)

 

Friday, April 27th, 2018

8:15-9:00am    Breakfast & Coffee for All

 

9:00-10:20am  –  Gloria Frost, “Congenital Disabilities” (University of St. Thomas)  (via Skype)

Chair: Miguel Romero (Salve Regina University)

Commentator: Scott M. Williams (UNC Asheville)

 

10:35-11:55am  –  John Slotemaker, “Aquinas and Ockham on the Imago Dei and Intellectual Disabilities”

Chair: Mark K. Spencer (University of St. Thomas)

Commentator: Miguel Romero (Salve Regina University)

 

12-1:30pm    Lunch for all

 

1:30-2:50pm  –  Scott M. Williams, “Ableism, Medieval Concepts of Personhood, and Imago Dei Trinitatis

Chair: Richard Cross (University of Notre Dame)

Commentator: John Slotemaker (Fairfield University)

 

3:05-4:25pm  –  Miguel Romero, “Interpreting amentia in the Aristotelian-Thomistic Tradition: 16th Century Spanish Colonialism and the Disappearance of a Latin Medieval Account of Cognitive Impairment”

Chair: Thomas Ward (Baylor University)

Commentator: Mark K. Spencer (University of St. Thomas)

 

 

Saturday, April 28th, 2018

8:15-9:00am    Breakfast & Coffee for All

 

9:00-10:20am  –  Christina van Dyke, “Taking the ‘Dis’ out of Disability: Martyrs, Mystics, and Mothers in the Middle Ages” (Calvin College)

Chair: Kevin Timpe (Calvin College)

Commentator: Scott M. Williams (UNC Asheville)

 

10:35-11:55am  –  Mark K. Spencer, “Separated Souls: Disability in the Intermediate State”

Chair: Richard Cross (University of Notre Dame)

Commentator: Thomas Ward (Baylor University)

 

12-1:30pm    Lunch for all

 

1:30-2:50pm  –  Richard Cross, “Disabilities in Heaven”

Chair: Scott M. Williams (UNC Asheville)

Commentator: Christina van Dyke (Calvin College)

 

3:05-4:25pm – Thomas Ward, “Thomas Aquinas and Duns Scotus: Disabilities and the Beatific Vision”

Chair: John Slotemaker (Fairfield University)

Commentator: Kevin Timpe (Calvin College)

 

4:35-5:15 – Closing Panel Session with Conference Speakers

Chair: Scott M. Williams (UNC Asheville)

More infos on the university of Notre Dame website.

CFP – Society for the Social History of Medicine Conference 2018 – Conformity, Resistance, Dialogue and Deviance in Health and Medicine Liverpool, 11-13 July 2018.

Society for the Social History of Medicine Conference 2018

Conformity, Resistance, Dialogue and Deviance in Health and Medicine

Liverpool, 11-13 July 2018

Hosted by The Centre for the Humanities and Social Sciences of Health, Medicine and Technology

The Society for the Social History of Medicine hosts a major, biennial, international, and interdisciplinary conference, and from 11-13 July 2018 it will meet in Liverpool to explore the theme of ‘Conformity, Resistance, Dialogue and Deviance in Health and Medicine’.

This broad theme plays on several levels. It reflects local Liverpool health heritage as a site of public health innovation; independent and at times radical approaches to health politics, health inequalities, health determinants, treatment and therapies (including technological innovation, community and collective practices, and the use of arts in health).

Call for Papers

Upcoming SSHM Events

The Society for the Social History of Medicine hosts a major biennial, international, and interdisciplinary conference. From 11-13 July 2018 it will meet in Liverpool to explore the theme of ‘Conformity, Resistance, Dialogue and Deviance in Health and Medicine’.

This broad theme plays on several levels. It reflects local Liverpool health heritage as a site of public health innovation; independent and at times radical approaches to health politics, health inequalities, health determinants, treatment and therapies (including technological innovation, community and collective practices, and the use of arts in health).

We envisage that this conference theme will also stimulate participants to think about how medical orthodoxy has been shaped and re-molded, and how patients and practitioners choose to conform to conventional practices, seek alternatives, resist or compromise. The theme further facilitates a transnational conference strand, examining the construction of, and attitudes towards, Western and other medical traditions and health systems. In light of this theme, the 2018 conference committee encourages papers, sessions, round-tables and other interventions that examine, challenge, and refine histories of conformity, resistance, dialogue and deviance in medicine and health. These might be set in relation to inclusions, exclusions and injustices; insiders, outsiders and mediators; peoples, places and cultures; and diverse and expanding new social histories of health and medicine.

But the biennial conference is not exclusive in terms of its theme, and reflects the diversity of the discipline of the social history of medicine. Proposals that consider all topics relevant to histories of health and medicine broadly conceived are invited. Nor are submissions restricted to any area of study: we welcome a range of disciplinary approaches, time periods and geographical contexts. Submissions from scholars across the range of career stages are most welcome, and especially from postgraduate and early career researchers.

Possible topics include:

  • Health and medicine in colonial, postcolonial and transnational contexts
  • The political economy of health and medicine
  • Theories and practices of conformity and deviancy in health and medicine
  • New ways of framing working within the social history of medicine
  • Radical politics and resistance to dominant medical knowledge and practice
  • Critical theory and social movements such as feminist, postcolonial, disability and queer theory and activism in relation to health and medicine
  • Relations between different cultures of health and medicine
  • Inequalities of health and medical care
  • Public health
  • The environment and health
  • Animals, disease and health
  • Work and health
  • Arts and health
  • Popular representations of health and medicine

Individual submissions should include a 250 word abstract, including five key words and a one paragraph CV/resume with contact information.
Panel submissions should include three papers (each with a 250 word abstract, including five key words and a short CV), a chair, and a 100-word panel abstract.
Round table submissions should include the names of four participants (each with a short CV), a chair, a 500-word abstract and five key words.
We also invite poster presentations, short films and ideas for new sessions.

Deadline for Proposals
Friday 2 February 2018
sshm2018@liverpool.ac.uk

Bursaries

The Society offers bursaries to assist students in meeting the financial costs of attending the conference. Find out more and how to apply here.

New book – Prosthesis in Medieval and Early Modern Culture – Edited by Chloe Porter, Katie L. Walter, Margaret Healy

Prosthesis in Medieval and Early Modern Culture

Edited by Chloe Porter, Katie L. Walter, Margaret Healy

2018 Routledge

Description by the editor :

« ‘Prosthesis’ denotes a rhetorical ‘addition’ to a pre-existing ‘beginning’, a ‘replacement’ for that which is ‘defective or absent’, a technological mode of ‘correction’ that reveals a history of corporeal and psychic discontent. Recent scholarship has given weight to these multiple meanings of ‘prosthesis’ as tools of analysis for literary and cultural criticism. The study of pre-modern prosthesis, however, often registers as an absence in contemporary critical discourse.

This collection seeks to redress this omission, reconsidering the history of prosthesis and its implications for contemporary critical responses to, and uses of, it. The book demonstrates the significance of notions of prosthesis in medieval and early modern theological debate, Reformation controversy, and medical discourse and practice. It also tracks its importance for imaginings of community and of the relationship of self and other, as performed on the stage, expressed in poetry, charms, exemplary and devotional literature, and as fought over in the documents of religious and cultural change. Interdisciplinary in nature, the book engages with contemporary critical and cultural theory and philosophy, genre theory, literary history, disability studies, and medical humanities, establishing prosthesis as a richly productive analytical tool in the pre-modern, as well as the modern, context. This book was originally published as a special issue of the Textual Practice journal. »

More infos on the editor website !

New publication – Book – Viewing Disability in Medieval Spanish Texts by Connie L. Scarborough.

Viewing Disability in Medieval Spanish Texts

by Connie L. Scarborough.

Amsterdam University Press,

Series: Premodern Health, Disease, and Disability

Description by the editor :

« This book is one of the first to examine medieval Spanish canonical works for their portrayals of disability in relationship to theological teachings, legal precepts, and medical knowledge. Connie L. Scarborough shows that physical impairments were seen differently through each lens. Theology at times taught that the disabled were « marked by God, » their sins rendered on their bodies; at other times, they were viewed as important objects of Christian charity. The disabled often suffered legal restrictions, allowing them to be viewed with other distinctive groups, such as the ill or the poor. And from a medical point of view, a miraculous cure could be seen as evidence of divine intervention. This book explores all these perspectives through medieval Spain’s miracle narratives, hagiographies, didactic tales, and epic poetry.  »

More infos on the editor website.

Meetings – Seminar – Birkbeck Medieval Seminar: The Productive Medieval Body, Fri 1 June 2018, Keynes Library, School of Arts, Birkbeck, 43 Gordon Square, London.

Birkbeck Medieval Seminar: The Productive Medieval Body

Fri 1 June 2018,

Keynes Library, School of Arts, Birkbeck, 43 Gordon Square, London.

 

The Birkbeck Medieval Seminar is an annual event. It is free and open to all scholars of the Middle Ages. It is designed to foster conversation and debate on a particular topic within medieval studies by providing the opportunity to hear new research from experts in the field. We are a welcoming and inclusive environment. This venue is fully accessible. Please contact Isabel Davis (i.davis@bbk.ac.uk) for further information or if you need help using the registration site.

Speakers:

Kim Phillips (Auckland);

Maaike van der Lugt (Paris – Diderot);

Vincent Gillespie (Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford)

and Alicia Spencer-Hall (UCL).

Titles to be confirmed.

Coffee and tea is provided but you will need to find or bring your own lunch.

Please note: this is a free event and, as such, if you book a ticket and later find out that you cannot attend, please do cancel your booking so that your place can be made available to someone else.

 

More infos on the Evenbrite of the event

CFP – Chaucer: Sound and Vision – October 19th and 20th, 2018 – University of South Alabama

CFP – Chaucer: Sound and Vision,

October 19th and 20th, 2018

Deadline for Submissions: May 1, 2018

Name of Organization: University of South Alabama

Contact Email: ChaucerSoundAndVision@gmail.com

The English Department at the University of South Alabama invites paper proposals for a conference on Chaucer and the senses (vision, hearing, touch, smell, taste), to be held in Mobile, Alabama, October 19th and 20th, 2018. Papers on any aspect of the topic are welcome, along with papers on writers contemporary with Chaucer (Langland, Gower, the Pearl-poet, Julian of Norwich, etc.).

The plenary speaker will be Michael P. Kuczynski of Tulane University. The conference will also include a roundtable discussion on the state of Sound Studies. Outstanding papers will also be invited to submit expanded versions for an edited volume on the topic.

Please send proposals of 350 words to John Halbrooks and Becky McLaughlin at ChaucerSoundAndVision@gmail.com by May 1, 2018.

History of Disease, Disability & Medicine in Medieval Europe