CFP – Leeds 2020 – (Un)bound Bodies: New Approaches

(Un)bound Bodies: New Approaches (Les corps (non)liés)

 
 
Leeds IMC | 6th-9th July 2020
 
For decades, bodies have been a central framework for historical inquiries. No matter how much we try to distance ourselves from them, bodies remain at the centre and borders of scholarship. Medieval bodies were fluid and contradictory loci: bound and unbound, contained yet susceptible to a host of external physical and invisible forces. Bodily boundaries were paradoxically sharp, debated, and real, yet also fluid, permeable and imaginary.
 
This new strand at IMC 2020 seeks to investigate these ‘real’ and ‘imaginary’ borders of the body and to complicate and critique existing narratives of ‘bound bodies’. As such, this strand is intentionally broad in its scope and embraces innovative and interdisciplinary approaches that push back, and go beyond, established methodologies. 
 
What? Twenty-minute papers; interest in a roundtable discussion also welcome
 
Who? Scholars from all career stages, eras and geographies. ECR and Queer approaches are particularly welcome. 
 
Suggested topics include (but are not limited to): 
 
· Un-binding scholarship: innovative approaches to bodies
 
· Bodily layers: ligaments, nerves, blood, bone, flesh, clothing
 
· Bodies and the cosmos: healing, magical influences, microcosm/macrocosm
 
· Bodies in flux: sensory experience, synaesthesia, bodily passions and emotions, cross dressing
 
· Bodily interactions: homosociality, sexuality, movement, legal systems
 
Please send titles and abstracts (maximum 250 words) together with a short biography and institutional affiliation (where relevant) to Jack Ford (jack.ford.13@ucl.ac.uk) or Lauren Rozenberg (lauren.rozenberg.14@ucl.ac.ukby 15th September.
 
Please also see the attached file for the CfP poster. Anyone applying will have to bear in mind that they will need to be registered to attend the IMC and unfortunately, as a new strand, we cannot cover any registration fees or transportation costs. Further information about the IMC can be found here: https://www.imc.leeds.ac.uk/

CFP – The Senses in Medieval and Renaissance Europe: Hearing and Auditory Perception – Trinity College Dublin 24-25 April 2020

   

The Senses in Medieval and Renaissance Europe: Hearing and Auditory Perception

Trinity College Dublin

24-25 April 2020

Proposals for papers are invited for a conference on The Senses in Medieval and Renaissance Europe: Hearing and Auditory Perception, which aims to provide an international and interdisciplinary forum for researchers with an interest in the history of the senses in the Middle Ages and Renaissance.

manesse_f.-410r

Keynote Speaker:

Professor David Hendy, University of Sussex

Echoes on the Air: How Modern Media Evoke and Dramatize
the Sounds of the Distant Past

The history of the senses is a rapidly expanding field of research. Pioneered in Early Modern and Modern Studies, it is now attracting attention also from Medieval and Renaissance specialists. Preoccupation with the human senses and with divine control over them is evident in a range of narrative texts, scientific treatises, creative literature, as well as the visual arts and music from the pre-modern period. This conference – the second in a series devoted to the five senses – aims to contribute to this expansion by bringing together leading researchers to exchange ideas and approaches.

The conference organisers have signed a five-book contract with Brepols which is based on the theme: ‘The Senses in Medieval and Renaissance Europe’. The proceedings of our 2016 conference, ‘Sight and Visual Perception’, held in University College Dublin, edited by Ann Buckley and Edward Coleman, are due for publication in 2020.

We invite proposals from the full range of disciplines including (but not limited to) history, archaeology, musicology, art history, architecture, literary studies, acoustics, astronomy, physics, medicine. Contributions from established and early-career scholars as well as postgraduates are all equally welcome.

Suggested topics include (but are not limited to):

  • humanly organised sound
  • music (social and religious ritual; art, leisure)
  • musica et scientia
  • sound and social meaning
  • sound and the emotions
  • sound and healing
  • sound and the body
  • soundscapes
  • sound and nature
  • sound and the regulation of time
  • sound and religious experience
  • deafness and its consequences
  • hearing and medicine
  • exploring the physics of sound in the middle ages and renaissance

Titles and abstracts (maximum 300 words) together with a short biography, institutional affiliation (where relevant), and contact details should be sent to medrenforum@gmail.com by 1 December 2019. Proposals for panels are also encouraged.

Registration fee €40 (Students and other concessions: €25)

Click here to download Conference Poster.

Programme

Abstracts

Welcome Pack

Organizing Committee:
Dr Ann Buckley (Trinity College Dublin)
Dr Edward Coleman (University College Dublin)
Dr Carrie Griffin (University of Limerick)
Dr Emer Purcell (National University of Ireland)

Forum for Medieval and Renaissance Studies in Ireland (FMRSI)
Webwww.fmrsi.wordpress.com
Emailmedrenforum@gmail.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ForumMRSI Twitter: @FMRSI

CFP – Gender and History – Special Issue: Health, Healing and Caring

Gender & History is an international journal for research and writing on the history of femininity, masculinity and gender relations. This Call for Papers is aimed at scholars studying any country or region, and any temporal period, including the classical, medieval, early modern, modern, and contemporary periods.

This Special Issue will explore the gendered history of healing and caring from the perspective of the sick and suffering, and various types of healers and caregivers. It aims to move beyond institutional histories of biomedicine, canonical medical knowledge, and allopathic approaches to health. We seek to showcase research that reflects upon the gendered dynamics of palliative care and the formation of diverse communities and economies of health and healing. We recognize that historical reckonings of health and bodily knowledge in many locales have been dominated by sources maintained in state, colonial, and missionary archives, and by notions of medicine shaped in white settler institutions. In an effort to destabilize these reckonings and to uncover marginalized forms of knowledge and practice, we encourage research informed by diverse methodologies and an imaginative approach to source material.

In recent years, medical anthropologists have shed light on the complex and unequal co-production of biomedical knowledge and “traditional” forms of medicine while feminist sociologists have illuminated the gendered dynamics of caregiving and the devaluation of its everyday and emotional labor. How might historians engage these cross-disciplinary methods and insights to reconstruct more nuanced and more expansive histories of healing and caring? What happens to our gendered histories of illness and medicine when we de-naturalize biomedical formations and examine palliative care in addition to therapeutic treatment? How has gender shaped which forms of healing and caring are recognized and institutionalized, and how has such privileging changed over time?

We understand that historically a wide array of people have provided healing and caring including family members, shamans, spirit mediums, healers, Elders, herbalists, diviners, faith healers, and wise-women and men as well as midwives, nurses, aids, and doctors. Their practices have ranged from diagnosing illnesses, administering medicines, and performing procedures to offering spiritual and psychological counsel. They have also included forms of body work such as grooming, feeding, bathing, massage and manipulation, and handling the dead.

Papers are invited from established scholars as well as new, emerging, and unaffiliated scholars who consider a variety of historical moments and locations, or transnational and even global processes related to themes such as the following:

●Intersectional approaches that examine how social identities and inequalities rooted in gender,race, ethnicity, sexuality, class, religion, and nationality have long shaped people’s access tohealth resources and care and, in turn, given rise to disparate patterns and experiences of well-being and illness.

●Reconstruction of deep histories of gendered healing and caring, extending back well before thetwentieth century, that reveal how healing and caring practices have been central concerns forboth individuals and societies and how those concerns have often animated and reconfiguredcultural institutions, political ideologies, and economic relations and markets.

●Consideration of the connections and tensions between various modes of healing and palliation,and how those relations have informed the frequently gendered and racialized separation of“professional” and “modern” medicine from modes designated as “traditional,” “informal,”“alternative,” or “home-based.”

●Examination of how people have transmitted healing and caring epistemologies and practicesacross generations and geographic distances, including how women have sought to maintain orassert control over their health and how various archives have worked both to represent andobscure those efforts.

●Engagement with concepts from disability studies, queer theory, and crip theory to betterunderstand the history of illnesses and diseases that have often been both gendered andstigmatized such as depression, hysteria, reproductive maladies, infertility, and sexuallytransmitted infections.

Interested individuals are asked to submit 500-word abstracts, a brief biography (250 words), and a cv by 31 August 2019 at 5pm PDT for consideration. Abstracts will be reviewed by the guest editors and successful proponents will participate in a symposium at Vancouver Island University in British Columbia, Canada, on 8 May 2020. Papers must be submitted six weeks prior to the symposium. Papers should be 6000-8000 words in length. After the symposium, papers will go through the journal’s peer review system. As with any article, there is no guarantee of publication. The editors are in the process of applying for funding to defray the cost of the travel to the symposium for new, emerging, and unaffiliated scholars. Please send abstracts, biographies, and CVs by email to genderhistory@viu.ca or by mail to The Editors, Gender & History, Vancouver Island University, 900 Fifth Street, Nanaimo, BC V9R 5S5. The Special Issue will be edited by Drs. Kristin Burnett, Sara Ritchey, and Lynn M. Thomas.

Special Issue Timeline Abstracts to SI editors — 31 August 2019 Papers circulated to symposium participants — 15 March 2020 Symposium at Vancouver Island University (Nanaimo, British Columbia) — 8 May 2020Full submissions to SI editors (papers submitted on ScholarOne) for peer review — 31 August, 2020 Revised submissions (and any image permissions) to SI editors — 31 May 2021 Publication — October 2021

IMC Leeds 2020 – Dis/ability in the medieval North

Call for papers: IMC Leeds 2020
6–9 July, 2020
Dis/ability in the medieval North
Organizers: Christopher Crocker and
Yoav Tirosh (University of Iceland)

In line with the now commonly accepted premise that disability is a multi-factorial phenomenon, scholars have come to realise that there can be no fixed, acultural and/or atemporal definition of disability. Scholars today commonly make use of the concepts of ‘embodied difference’ and ‘marked or unusual bodies’ as they do not imply pre-defined notions of disability. Although disability is negotiated with the body as a central platform, scholars are not limited to speaking only of the physicality of bodies. Rather the body materialises and translates physical, psychic, and intellectual differences in ways that societies can identify them as deviations from what is considered ‘normal’ in specific temporal contexts. Indeed, the phenomenon of disability cannot be studied without understanding how the notions of ‘ability’ and ‘normal’ are conceptualized. The term ‘dis/ability’ can thus be used to remind us that it is not possible to understand one without recognizing the other.


Within this theoretical context, we invite paper proposals on the topic of Dis/ability in the Medieval North for a series of sessions of 15–20-minute papers to be held at the International Medieval Congress (IMC) 2020 at the University of Leeds (6–9 July 2020). The study of disability intrinsically crosses disciplinary boundaries and so we welcome contributions from a range of disciplines. In the context of the medieval North, suggested topics include, but are not limited to:
▪ Approaches to the experience of dis/ability through sources, methodology, and narrative
▪ Dis/ability and society, religion, law or medical knowledge
▪ Intersections of dis/ability with age, gender, social status, etc.
▪ Dis/ability, assistive technology, and care
▪ Terminology or language of dis/ability


We invite abstracts of 200–300 words to be sent to cwe1@hi.is by August 30, 2019, with a view to confirming participants in the sessions by mid-September. Please direct any queries to cwe1@hi.is or tiroshyoav@yahoo.com.


The proposed sessions emerge from the interdisciplinary research project Disability before disability (Icel. Fötlun fyrir tíma fötlunar) situated at the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Iceland and supported by the Icelandic Research fund (Icel. Rannsóknasjóður) Grant of Excellence No 173655-05.

Where to be in Leeds 2019 to learn & discuss medieval disabilities?

 

You can see the full Leeds’ program here

 

MONDAY

Session 111
Title Rages, Rampages, and Wounds: Emotions in Epic Literature
Date/Time Monday 1 July 2019: 11.15-12.45
 
Sponsor Société Rencesvals British Branch
 
Organiser Hailey Ogle, St Andrews Institute of Mediaeval Studies / School of Modern Languages, University of St Andrews
 
Moderator/Chair Emma Campbell, Department of French Studies, University of Warwick
 
Paper 111-a Hurling Spears and Burning Convents: Anger in Raoul de Cambrai
(Language: English) 
Hailey Ogle, St Andrews Institute of Mediaeval Studies / School of Modern Languages, University of St Andrews 
Index Terms: Language and Literature – French or Occitan; Mentalities; Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 111-b Legitimizing Arthur’s Rule: Wounding and Emotions in Off Arthour & Of Merlin
(Language: English) 
Laura Bernardazzi, St Andrews Institute of Mediaeval Studies, University of St Andrews 
Index Terms: Language and Literature – Comparative; Language and Literature – French or Occitan; Language and Literature – Middle English; Medicine
Paper 111-c Emotions, Actions, and Outcomes: A Comparative Analysis of the Relatio metrica and La Destruction de Rome
(Language: English) 
Amanda Swinford, Department of History, Portland State University, Oregon 
Index Terms: Language and Literature – Comparative; Language and Literature – French or Occitan; Language and Literature – Latin; Religious Life
 
Abstract

Emotions are an intrinsic element of medieval epic literature. Their representation, performance, and function in a specific text offer critical insights into the social, political, religious, and cultural world within which that text was produced and transmitted. The papers in this session will examine the ways in which emotions are deeply connected to cultural ideologies; how the presence of emotions in a text can change the emotive response of the text’s intended audience; and how emotions drive and prompt physical actions and responses. Analysing medieval French, English, and Latin literatures of the high and late Middle Ages, this session will ultimately demonstrate the benefit, and indeed, necessity of the study of emotions in medieval literatures.

 

Session 120
Title Bodies and Souls: Image, Text, Materiality
Date/Time Monday 1 July 2019: 11.15-12.45
 
Organiser IMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/Chair Andrea Mancini, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
 
Paper 120-a ‘Geswinc, geswel ond wyrmas’: Understanding Cancer in Anglo-Saxon England
(Language: English) 
Berber Bossenbroek, Faculteit der Geesteswetenschappen, Universiteit Leiden 
Index Terms: Language and Literature – Old English; Medicine
Paper 120-b Kind Death: Greeting the Soul in 14th-Century Venice
(Language: English) 
Sarah Schell, School of Arts & Sciences, American University in Dubai, United Arab Emirates 
Index Terms: Art History – Painting; Lay Piety; Social History
Paper 120-c Materialità del corpo nella medicina medievale araba
(Language: Italiano) 
Sara Lenzi, Departamento de Historia de la Filosofía, Estética y Teoría del Conocimiento, Universidad Complutense de Madrid 
Index Terms: Islamic and Arabic Studies; Medicine; Philosophy
 
Abstract

Paper -a: 
While the Anglo-Saxon medical text corpus has received increasing scholarly attention over the past few decades, no in-depth study of the Anglo-Saxon understanding of the diseases that are known today under the umbrella term ‘cancer’ has yet been conducted. The Anglo-Saxon text corpus contains a substantial number of texts that deal with the diagnosis and treatment of various cancers. This paper examines what materials were available to the Anglo-Saxon læce [leech] when encountering cancer. Using both literary and medical texts as sources, my paper will explore the understanding the Anglo-Saxons had of different types of cancer, what remedies they used, and how effective these remedies can be said to have been in light of today’s medical knowledge. 

Paper -b: 
The figure of Death made an appearance in many literary and visual genres in the 14th century, often in images of gruesome decay, restless corpses, and vain skeletons. These scenes of Death present a combative and predatory figure. In contrast, in a small 14th-century Venetian panel, Death appears in a role usually occupied by the saints: Death as intercessor, presenting a soul to the merciful Madonna. The presentation of a Death-figure in this manner raises questions about the role and function of intercessory figures, and presents a visual challenge to the traditional combative characterization of Death. Was there a place for a ‘Kind Death’ in 14th-century visual tradition and religious thought? 

Paper -c: 
Il corpo, nella sua materialità, fu qualcosa di imprescindibile anche per quei filosofi, saggi, medici, che in epoca medievale, tendevano a cercare e dare risposte prevalentemente di carattere metafisico. In alcuni campi più che in altri, pensiamo alla medicina, tralasciare il corpo sarebbe equivalso a lasciare da parte la disciplina stessa. Ne sono dimostrazione gli studi, necessariamente in gran parte empirici (pensiamo all’oftalmologia o l’urologia), le pratiche concrete e l’uso di utensili ad hoc, di molti medici arabi. Inoltre la separazione voluta da Averroè, tra fisiologia e anatomia, conferì a quest’ultima, autonomia e dignità rendendo il corpo umano una vera e propria RES.

 

 

 

Session 218
Title Body Matters: Exploring the Materiality of the Medieval Human Body
Date/Time Monday 1 July 2019: 14.15-15.45
 
Sponsor University of Wales Trinity Saint David, Lampeter
 
Organiser Harriett Webster, School of Archaeology, History & Anthropology, University of Wales Trinity Saint David, Lampeter
 
Moderator/Chair Louise Steel, Faculty of Humanities & Performing Arts, University of Wales Trinity Saint David, Lampeter
 
Paper 218-a All Fingers, No Thumbs: The Materiality of a Medieval Relic
(Language: English) 
Janet Burton, Faculty of Humanities & Performing Arts, University of Wales Trinity Saint David, Lampeter 
Index Terms: Historiography – Medieval; Manuscripts and Palaeography; Monasticism; Religious Life
Paper 218-b ‘My Precious Body’: The (Im)Materiality of the Body in Margaret of York’s Manuscripts
(Language: English) 
Erica Blair O’Brien, Department of History of Art, University of Bristol 
Index Terms: Art History – General; Lay Piety; Manuscripts and Palaeography; Religious Life
Paper 218-c The Resuscitation of the Twice-Hanged Man: Miracles and the Body in Medieval Swansea
(Language: English) 
Harriett Webster, School of Archaeology, History & Anthropology, University of Wales Trinity Saint David, Lampeter 
Index Terms: Lay Piety; Local History; Manuscripts and Palaeography; Theology
 
Abstract This session examines medieval attitudes towards the materiality of the human body through three case studies: the finger relic of St Germanus of Auxerre from Selby Abbey; the portrait illuminations of Margaret of York; and the hanged corpse of a Welsh rebel. The surviving manuscript evidence in each case helps us to develop a more rounded understanding of medieval perceptions of materiality and agency in relation to the body, in particular popular and elite beliefs about death, decay, and incorruptibility. A new publication featuring these papers will also be launched by University of Wales Press at the IMC this year.

 

Session 347
Title Monsters and Mental Health
Date/Time Monday 1 July 2019: 16.30-18.00
 
Sponsor Monsters: The Experimental Association for the Research of Cryptozoology through Scholarly Theory and Practical Application (MEARCSTAPA)
 
Organiser Kayla Kemhadjian, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
 
Moderator/Chair Wendy J. Turner, Department of History, Anthropology & Philosophy, Augusta University, Georgia
 
Paper 347-a Mental Health and the Demonic in Early Medieval England
(Language: English) 
Peter Dendle, Department of English, Pennsylvania State University, Monto Alto 
Index Terms: Daily Life; Medicine
Paper 347-b Monsters of Silence: The Pestiferous and the Monstrous in Late-Medieval Depictions of Carthusians and in Carthusian Writings
(Language: English) 
Tom Gaens, Faculteit der Letteren, Rijksuniversiteit Groningen 
Index Terms: Art History – General; Language and Literature – Latin; Monasticism
Paper 347-c Mental Health and the Pathology of Monsters in Early English Medicine
(Language: English) 
Gwendolyne Knight, Historiska institutionen, Stockholms Universitet 
Index Terms: Language and Literature – Old English; Medicine; Mentalities
Paper 347-d Madness and the Boundaries of the Human in Anglo-Saxon England
(Language: English) 
Marit Ronen, Independent Scholar, Upper Galilee 
Index Terms: Language and Literature – Old English; Social History
 
Abstract In modern times, mental health issues, like monsters, are used in fictive discourses to create a binary of the ‘normal’. In some instances, mental health is exploited as a marker of the monstrous, if not the monster itself. Similar instances abound in the Middle Ages, when the border between mental health and the supernatural ran thin. This panel seeks to examine the interconnectedness of mental health and the monstrous. In doing so, this panel may uncover and examine medieval stigmas around mental health which still permeate western society.

 

Tuesday

Session 520
Title ‘Deformis formositas ac formosa deformitas’ / The Ugliness of Beauty and the Beauty of Ugliness, I: Ugliness and Deformity in Medieval Texts
Date/Time Tuesday 2 July 2019: 09.00-10.30
 
Organiser Teodora Artimon, Trivent Publishing, Budapest
  Andrea-Bianka Znorovszky, Dipartimento di Studi Umanistici, Università Ca’ Foscari, Venezia
 
Moderator/Chair Teodora Artimon, Trivent Publishing, Budapest
 
Paper 520-a The Grotesque Male Revenant and the Gorgeous Female Revenant: The Dichotomy of Ugliness Post-Mortem in English Chronicles
(Language: English) 
Candace Reilly, Centre for Medieval Studies, University of York 
Index Terms: Gender Studies; Science
Paper 520-b The Ugly Body Is ‘a shame of nature’: Perceptions of Ugliness in Byzantine Medieval Texts
(Language: English) 
Oana Maria Cojocaru, Department of Historical, Philosophical & Religious Studies, University of Umea 
Index Terms: Byzantine Studies; Mentalities
Paper 520-c The Dwarf of Hispanic Chivalric Literature
(Language: English) 
Juan Pablo Mauricio García Álvarez, Centro Universitario de Ciencias Sociales y Humanidades, Universidad de Guadalajara, Mexico 
Index Terms: Language and Literature – Spanish or Portuguese; Mentalities
Paper 520-d Delightfully Grotesque: Beautiful Representations of Ugliness in Late Medieval France
(Language: English) 
Kleio Pethainou, Edinburgh College of Art, University of Edinburgh
Index Terms: Art History – General; Art History – Painting; Manuscripts and Palaeography; Mentalities
 
Abstract The session discusses the concept of ‘ugliness’ in textual sources pertaining to the medieval East and West. It focuses on the narrative function of ugliness, embodied in the figure of the dwarf, by tracing its construction and development in Hispanic chivalric literature and culture. It highlights gendered aspects, in English chronicles and religious sources, by contrasting the sensuality/beauty of the undead female with the deformed/decomposed male corpse. Furthermore, it discusses the forms and representations of ugliness in the framework of attitudes towards the imperfect body in Byzantine medieval texts. Finally, the session discusses manuscript illuminations from Late Medieval France that represent the ugly and the grotesque, and treat ugliness as something beautiful and worthy to be emphasised by analyzing their social contexts and patronage.

 

Session 550
Title Health in Medieval Urban Society
Date/Time Tuesday 2 July 2019: 09.00-10.30
 
Organiser IMC Programming Committee
 
Moderator/Chair Irina Metzler, Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Research (MEMO), Swansea University
 
Paper 550-a Maßnahmen zur Verbesserung der städtischen Hygiene im mittelalterlichen Leipzig
(Language: Deutsch) 
Jill Rehfeldt, DFG-Graduiertenkolleg 1913 ‘Kulturelle und technische Werte historischer Bauten’, Brandenburgische Technische Universität, Cottbus-Seftenberg 
Index Terms: Archaeology – Sites; Daily Life; Technology
Paper 550-b Health Regulations in Late Medieval London
(Language: English) 
Wendy J. Turner, Department of History, Anthropology & Philosophy, Augusta University, Georgia 
Index Terms: Daily Life; Law; Medicine; Social History
Paper 550-c Advice and Recipes against Plague in 15th-Century Portugal
(Language: English) 
Dulce Oliveira Amarante dos Santos, Faculdade de História, Universidade Federal de Goiás, Brazil 
Index Terms: Medicine; Social History
 
Abstract Paper -a: 
Entgegen populärer Anschauungen waren die Ver- und Entsorgung von Wasser, die Beseitigung von Abfällen und Exkrementen sowie ein ansehnliches Stadtbild zentrale Themen der mittelalterlichen Kommunen. Als Messe- und Universitätsstadt am Kreuzungspunkt der via imperii und via regia gelegen war Leipzig schon im Mittelalter von einem hohen Bevölkerungsanstieg, einer starken Handelstätigkeit und Mobilität geprägt, was sich auf die hygienischen Verhältnisse auswirkte. Die Bemühungen des Rates, die Stadt mit ausreichend Wasser zu versorgen und der Verschmutzung beizukommen, lassen sich in den archäologischen und historischen Quellen ablesen. Der Fokus des Papers liegt daher in den städtebaulichen Maßnahmen, die diese Bemühungen nach sich zogen. 

Paper -b: 
This research examines the health regulations and laws passed both before and after the outbreak of the plague. London local regulations regarding the health and wellbeing of the citizens inside the walls and just outside the walls as well as similar royal legal changes altered the way commerce was practiced, who was permitted inside the walls at what times of the day and night, and how people looked at illness and health. 

Paper -c: 
In the realm of Portugal, after the Black Death (1348-1349) there are several outbreaks of plague during the 15th century. This fact then generated an interest on medical matters inside the royal court. The Portuguese prince and later king D. Duarte (1434-1438) included in his personal library some titles on medicine, such as Canon of AvicenaBook of Leper and so on. He used to talk with the court Jewish physician and astrologue Master Guedelha and others about medical practices. The king, worried on the kingdom’s health, had compiled some advices and recipes (mezinhas in archaic Portuguese) against plague in his Book of Cartuxa or Book of Advices.

 

Session 553
Title It’s Personal: The Impact of Lived Experience on the Conceptualization of the Sacred, I
Date/Time Tuesday 2 July 2019: 09.00-10.30
 
Organiser Einat Klafter, Zvi Yavetz School of Historical Studies, Tel Aviv University
 
Moderator/Chair Amanda Langley, School of History, Queen Mary, University of London
 
Paper 553-a ‘Making your bed and having Christ lie in it’: Suffering, Bibliotherapy, and Christus Medicus in Devotio ModernaSister-Books and Julian of Norwich’s A Revelation of Love
(Language: English) 
Godelinde Gertrude Perk, Independent Scholar, Umeå 
Index Terms: Language and Literature – Middle English; Medicine; Theology; Women’s Studies
Paper 553-b ‘Is any payne like this?’: Julian of Norwich and a Phenomenology of Illness
(Language: English) 
Hannah Lucas, Faculty of English Language & Literature, University of Oxford 
Index Terms: Language and Literature – Middle English; Medicine; Theology; Women’s Studies
Paper 553-c Experiencing the Trauma of the Cross: Divine Passibility in the Mystical Experience of Angela of Foligno
(Language: English) 
Christina Llanes, Divinity School, University of Chicago 
Index Terms: Language and Literature – Italian; Medicine; Theology; Women’s Studies
 
Abstract Scholarship on the lived experiences of female mystics generally focuses on how these experiences contributed to the construction of holy women’s selfhood and their wider social roles. Less attention has been paid to how such personal histories influenced the conceptualization of the divine within late-medieval female affective piety. The papers will examine the different articulations of the unio mystica in light of the individual experiences of holy women, particularly issues of trauma and pain, and explore how such an approach allows us to look at the work of late-medieval female mystics no longer as a homogenous corpus but as an ensemble of unique and idiosyncratic texts.

 

Session 613
Title Ageing in Late Medieval Europe: A Gendered Perspective
Date/Time Tuesday 2 July 2019: 11.15-12.45
 
Sponsor Anthropologie historique du long Moyen Âge (AHLOMA) – École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales (EHESS), Paris
 
Organiser Laura Cayrol-Bernardo, Centre de Recherches Historiques, École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales (EHESS), Paris
 
Moderator/Chair Araceli Rosillo-Luque, Arxiu-Biblioteca dels Franciscans de Catalunya, Barcelona
 
Paper 613-a Laughing at Growing Old: Ageing and Self-Derision in Late Medieval French Poetry
(Language: English) 
Camille Brouzes, Litt&Arts (UMR 5316), Université Grenoble Alpes
Index Terms: Gender Studies; Language and Literature – French or Occitan; Mentalities
Paper 613-b Between Futility and Insatiable Lust: Attitudes about Ageing and Sexuality in Late Medieval Iberia
(Language: English) 
Laura Cayrol-Bernardo, Centre de Recherches Historiques, École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales (EHESS), Paris 
Index Terms: Gender Studies; Medicine; Mentalities; Sexuality
Paper 613-c Ending Their Days at the Hospital: Old Women in Catalonia during the Late Middle Ages
(Language: English) 
Mireia Comas-Via, Departament d’Història i Arqueologia, Universitat de Barcelona 
Index Terms: Charters and Diplomatics; Daily Life; Gender Studies; Social History
 
Abstract Over the last few decades, studies on the biological, economic, social, psychological and cultural aspects of old age have multiplied, due to current debate on ageing in western populations and its impact in our societies. However, despite the vast possibilities in social sciences to develop this topic of research, the subject still has not received the attention it deserves. This is particularly true when it comes to gender studies. This session aims to analyse different attitudes about aging and old age in Late Medieval Western Europe, bearing in mind how these affected both men and women. Our goal is to stress the legitimate importance of integrating age as an important category in studies on medieval gender, open new perspectives on a neglected topic, and raise awareness of its relevance and the permanence of some of its main characteristics in today’s world.

 

Session

620
Title ‘Deformis formositas ac formosa deformitas’ / The Ugliness of Beauty and the Beauty of Ugliness, II: Materializing Ugliness and Deformity in the Middle Ages
Date/Time Tuesday 2 July 2019: 11.15-12.45
 
Organiser Teodora Artimon, Trivent Publishing, Budapest
  Andrea-Bianka Znorovszky, Dipartimento di Studi Umanistici, Università Ca’ Foscari, Venezia
 
Moderator/Chair Teodora Artimon, Trivent Publishing, Budapest
 
Paper 620-a The Canon Law’s Category of the Defectus Corporis and Scandal
(Language: English) 
Ninon Dubourg, Laboratoire Identités Cultures et Territoires (ICT), Université Diderot Paris 7 
Index Terms: Canon Law; Medicine
Paper 620-b Trading in Beauty and Ugliness on Medieval Marriage Market
(Language: English) 
Federica Boldrini, Dipartimento di Giurisprudenza, Studi politici e internazionali, Università di Parma 
Index Terms: Law; Women’s Studies
Paper 620-c Deformity and the Body of the Sinner: Conceptualizing Deformity as Sin in Early Medieval Metaphor and Thought
(Language: English) 
Kayla Kemhadjian, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds 
Index Terms: Language and Literature – French or Occitan; Language and Literature – Old English; Mentalities
Paper 620-d The Identification of Beauty-Ugliness of Animals in Romanesque Church Capitals through Human Emotions
(Language: English) 
Hee Sook Lee-Niinioja, Independent Scholar, Helsinki 
Index Terms: Architecture – Religious; Art History – Sculpture
 
Abstract

The session debates the gendered aspects of ‘ugliness’ and its materializations when transferred from one cultural milieu to the other. It concentrates on aspects of beauty/ugliness with regard to the female body in the context of late medieval Italian marriage markets by presenting the circumstances when unmarried unsightly girls were favoured. It presents the defectus corporis of the clerical body as reflected in religious sources, particularly in canon law, in connection to the public’s attitude and the solutions offered for such cases. Furthermore, it traces the evolution and connection between sinners and deformity in late 10th century England, into the late 12th century, in the context of the shifts in the conceptualization of ugliness as sinful. Finally, it discusses the dichotomy of beauty-ugliness in the framework of the theological doctrines of Romanesque period and theories of emotions.

 

 

Session 639
Title The Sensuality of Things, II: Abilities and Disabilities
Date/Time Tuesday 2 July 2019: 11.15-12.45
 
Sponsor Oswald von Wolkenstein Gesellschaft
 
Organiser Silvan Wagner, Lehrstuhl für Ältere Deutsche Philologie, Universität Bayreuth
 
Moderator/Chair Sieglinde Hartmann, Oswald von Wolkenstein-Gesellschaft, Frankfurt am Main
 
Paper 639-a 15th-Century Page Turners: Movement on/through the Pages
(Language: English) 
Raoul DuBois, Deutsches Seminar, Universität Zürich 
Index Terms: Language and Literature – German; Manuscripts and Palaeography
Paper 639-b Trauma, Narrative, and the Impairment of Memory in the Works of Leonor López de Córdoba and Teresa de Cartagena
(Language: English) 
Catherine Maguire, School of Languages, Linguistics & Film, Queen Mary, University of London 
Index Terms: Gender Studies; Language and Literature – Spanish or Portuguese; Women’s Studies
Paper 639-c Picturing Disability East and West: Global Perspectives from Medieval Europe and Japan
(Language: English) 
Irina Metzler, Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Research (MEMO), Swansea University 
Index Terms: Anthropology; Historiography – Medieval; Mentalities
 
Abstract Within our second session ‘The Sensuality of Things’, speakers aim at focusing on the impairment of people, things, and transmission. An almost completely abraded text of Wolkenstein’s calendar poem, for example, tells us stories about its use and futility and, in the end, also of the intended structure of the whole manuscript. The autobiographic reflection of female rulers about their trauma gives us an insight into the intersection of gender and memory in late medieval Spain. In the last paper, the speaker focuses on physical disability in Europe and Japan thus offering a comparative examination of the ways people dealt with handicap in pre-modern societies.

 

Session 848
Title Huizinga’s Waning of the Middle Ages (First Published in 1919) and Its Impact on Cultural History of the Middle Ages
Date/Time Tuesday 2 July 2019: 16.30-18.00
 
Sponsor Centre for Religion & Heritage, Rijksuniversiteit Groningen
 
Organiser Mathilde van Dijk, Centre for Religion & Heritage, Rijksuniversiteit Groningen
 
Moderator/Chair Paul Binski, Department of History of Art, University of Cambridge
 
Paper 848-a Death and Illness
(Language: English) 
Catrien Santing, Afdeling Geschiedenis, Rijksuniversiteit Groningen 
Index Terms: Historiography – Modern Scholarship; Mentalities
Paper 848-b Chivalry
(Language: English) 
Mario Damen, Faculteit der Geesteswetenschappen, Universiteit van Amsterdam 
Index Terms: Historiography – Modern Scholarship; Mentalities
Paper 848-c Religion
(Language: English) 
Mathilde van Dijk, Centre for Religion & Heritage, Rijksuniversiteit Groningen 
Index Terms: Ecclesiastical History; Historiography – Modern Scholarship; Mentalities
 
Abstract In 1919, the Dutch historian Johan Huizinga published his Herfsttij der Middeleeuwen, later to be translated into English in 1924, under the title of ‘Waning of the Middle Ages’, and into several other languages, including German, Finnish, and Russian. Today, it is still in print. 
Few historical books have had such an impact on the field of medieval studies. Therefore, there is every reason to commemorate its 100th anniversary. In the round table, I would like prominent scholars in the field to assess Huizinga’s contribution to the cultural history of the Middle Ages and to discuss the value of his approach and findings today. How did he change medieval history? In how far is it still valuable and if yes, how? How does the Waning connect to present day approaches in various fields, such as the history of emotions, church history, gender studies, art history?

 

Wednesday

 

Session 1020
Title The Body and the Text: Medical Humanities and Medieval Literature, c. 1150-1550, I
Date/Time Wednesday 3 July 2019: 09.00-10.30
 
Sponsor Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Research (MEMO) / Medical Humanities Research Centre (MHRC), Swansea University
 
Organiser Laura Kalas Williams, Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Research (MEMO), Swansea University
  Alison Williams, Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Research (MEMO), Swansea University
 
Moderator/Chair Wendy J. Turner, Department of History, Anthropology & Philosophy, Augusta University, Georgia
 
Paper 1020-a Health Narratives: Rabelais and the Pox
(Language: English) 
Alison Williams, Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Research (MEMO), Swansea University 
Index Terms: Language and Literature – French or Occitan; Medicine
Paper 1020-b ‘Ye die for dole’: Mental Health and Social Reform in Piers Plowman
(Language: English) 
Martin Laidlaw, School of Humanities, University of Dundee 
Index Terms: Language and Literature – Middle English; Medicine
Paper 1020-c Beyond Magic: Maladies and Remedies in Geoffrey of Monmouth’s Vita Merlini
(Language: English) 
Karen A. Winstead, Department of English, Ohio State University 
Index Terms: Language and Literature – Latin; Medicine
 
Abstract This panel is one in a series of sessions which seeks to investigate how medicine, health, and wellbeing are represented in medieval literature, and how literary texts from this period contribute to training and practice in the Medical Humanities. This panel focuses on issues of mental health, psychological pain, melancholic suffering, and ‘unseen’ medical conditions, as they play out in medieval texts. Using later medieval literary texts, as well as Old Norse-Icelandic poetry, the session interrogates concepts such as the emotions, the affectivity of pain, and the healer, and asks how current notions of disability and social responsibility interact.

 

Session 1120
Title The Body and the Text: Medical Humanities and Medieval Literature, c. 1150-1550, II
Date/Time Wednesday 3 July 2019: 11.15-12.45
 
Sponsor Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Research (MEMO) / Medical Humanities Research Centre (MHRC), Swansea University
 
Organiser Laura Kalas Williams, Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Research (MEMO), Swansea University
  Alison Williams, Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Research (MEMO), Swansea University
 
Moderator/Chair Alison Williams, Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Research (MEMO), Swansea University
 
Paper 1120-a ‘Fet fin amur et concorde entre home and feme’: Natural Philosophy and Medical Intertextuality in Yale University, MS Beinecke 492
(Language: English) 
Theresa Lorraine Tyers, Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Research (MEMO), Swansea University 
Index Terms: Language and Literature – French or Occitan; Language and Literature – Middle English; Manuscripts and Palaeography; Medicine
Paper 1120-b Textual Medicine in Medieval England: Charms and the Body
(Language: English) 
Katherine Hindley, Department of English, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore 
Index Terms: Language and Literature – Middle English; Language and Literature – Old English; Medicine
Paper 1120-c Medicine, Miracle, and Muddled Methodology
(Language: English) 
Jude Seal, Department of History, Royal Holloway, University of London 
Index Terms: Language and Literature – Latin; Medicine
 
Abstract This panel is one in a series of sessions which seeks to investigate how medicine, health and wellbeing are represented in medieval literature, and how literary texts from this period contribute to training and practice in the Medical Humanities. This panel focuses on manuscript evidence in Latin, Anglo-Latin, Anglo-Saxon, and Old French. Boundaries between disciplines (natural philosophy and medicine), body and soul, and bodies and texts are investigated. The session also considers how manuscript evidence encourages an individually nuanced approach to disease and disability in the Middle Ages.

 

Session 1220
Title The Body and the Text: Medical Humanities and Medieval Literature, c. 1150-1550, III
Date/Time Wednesday 3 July 2019: 14.15-15.45
 
Sponsor Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Research (MEMO), Swansea University / Medical Humanities Research Centre (MHRC), Swansea University
 
Organiser Laura Kalas Williams, Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Research (MEMO), Swansea University
  Alison Williams, Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Research (MEMO), Swansea University
 
Moderator/Chair Theresa Lorraine Tyers, Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Research (MEMO), Swansea University
 
Paper 1220-a ‘Rede hit sofft’: Durative Healthcare in the Life and Poetry of John Audelay
(Language: English) 
Chelsea Silva, Department of English, University of California, Riverside 
Index Terms: Language and Literature – Middle English; Medicine
Paper 1220-b Losing the Will to Live?: Medical Prognosis and Pastoral Care in the Later Middle Ages
(Language: English) 
Joanne Edge, John Rylands Library, University of Manchester 
Index Terms: Manuscripts and Palaeography; Medicine
Paper 1220-c Mystical and Medical Death in The Book of Margery Kempe
(Language: English) 
Laura Kalas Williams, Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Research (MEMO), Swansea University 
Index Terms: Language and Literature – Middle English; Medicine
 
Abstract This panel is one in a series of sessions which seeks to investigate how medicine, health and wellbeing are represented in medieval literature, and how literary texts from this period contribute to training and practice in the Medical Humanities. This panel considers the boundary between life and death, the experience of sickness as spiritually-edifying, and the role of religious or monastic healthcare in the Middle Ages. Focusing on medieval medical prognostics, ‘regimens for sin’, and the desirability of the liminal state of mystical death, the session investigates the interaction of medicine and religion, challenging the very definition of ‘health’.

 

Thursday

 

Session 1510
Title Fertility and Infertility, I: Writing about Infertility
Date/Time Thursday 4 July 2019: 09.00-10.30
 
Sponsor Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Exeter
 
Organiser Catherine Rider, Department of History, University of Exeter
 
Moderator/Chair Joanne Edge, John Rylands Library, University of Manchester
 
Paper 1510-a ‘For both were old and Sarah’s periods had ceased’: Medieval Theologians and Infertile Bodies
(Language: English) 
Catherine Rider, Department of History, University of Exeter 
Index Terms: Ecclesiastical History; Medicine; Religious Life; Women’s Studies
Paper 1510-b ‘For Women who cannot have their Flowers’: Menstruation and Fertility Recipes in Early Modern Europe
(Language: English) 
Julia Martins, Department of History, King’s College London 
Index Terms: Medicine; Sexuality; Women’s Studies
Paper 1510-c Uroscopy and the Conceiving Body
(Language: English) 
Isabel Davis, Department of English & Humanities, Birkbeck, University of London 
Index Terms: Medicine; Sexuality; Women’s Studies
 
Abstract The history of infertility is a growing area of study, for the Middle Ages and for other periods. Recent work has examined medical and (less often) religious views of infertility, as well as the experiences of those seeking to conceive. This is one of two sessions that bring together medievalists working on these topics from a range of perspectives. This session looks at medical and religious writing on infertility, in order to uncover learned writers’ views of the subject and their relationship to practice. The second session looks at some of the best documented cases of infertility, among medieval kings and queens.

 

Session 1515
Title Material Presence, Power, and Pain: Bodies in Transition
Date/Time Thursday 4 July 2019: 09.00-10.30
 
Sponsor Historisches Seminar, Christian-Albrechts-Universität Kiel
 
Organiser Stephan Bruhn, Historisches Seminar/Mittelalterliche Geschichte, Christian-Albrechts-Universität Kiel
  Bianca Frohne, Historisches Seminar, Christian-Albrechts-Universität Kiel
 
Moderator/Chair Catrien Santing, Afdeling Geschiedenis, Rijksuniversiteit Groningen
 
Paper 1515-a The Materialisation of Relatives in High Medieval Frankish Nobility: From Written Words to Graphic Representation
(Language: English) 
Janina Lillge, Historisches Seminar, Christian-Albrechts-Universität Kiel 
Index Terms: Genealogy and Prosopography; Historiography – Medieval; Social History
Paper 1515-b Transcending Boundaries: Pain as Material Presence in Early Medieval Hagiography
(Language: English) 
Bianca Frohne, Historisches Seminar, Christian-Albrechts-Universität Kiel 
Index Terms: Hagiography; Medicine; Mentalities
Paper 1515-c Die Another Day?: The Ruler’s Body in Situations of Conquest – Anglo-Norman and Late Byzantine Literature in Comparison
(Language: English) 
Stephan Bruhn, Historisches Seminar/Mittelalterliche Geschichte, Christian-Albrechts-Universität Kiel 
Rike Szill, Historisches Seminar – Mittelalterliche Geschichte, Christian-Albrechts-Universität Kiel 
Index Terms: Byzantine Studies; Historiography – Medieval; Rhetoric
 
Abstract The session focuses, in a comparative perspective, on texts and cultural practices that call attention specifically to the materiality of the human body in a moment of transition. It brings together doctoral and postdoctoral researchers from Kiel University who are interested in the question of how corporeality can become a central focus within the source material they study. Each paper examines specific instances of such a materialisation, and asks what purpose they serve with regard to memorial practices, power relations, and the symbolism of suffering, death, restoration and regeneration. The session is co-organised by Bianca Frohne and Stephan Bruhn.

 

Session 1525
Title Mental and Material: Building World(s) in the Medieval North, I – Worlds of Literature
Date/Time Thursday 4 July 2019: 09.00-10.30
 
Organiser Rebecca Merkelbach, Deutsches Seminar / Skandinavistik, Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen
 
Moderator/Chair Rachel Evans, Department of English, University of Leicester
 
Paper 1525-a Tales from the Perilous Realm?: Exploring the World(s) of the ‘Post-Classical’ Sagas of Icelanders
(Language: English) 
Rebecca Merkelbach, Deutsches Seminar / Skandinavistik, Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen 
Index Terms: Language and Literature – Scandinavian; Mentalities
Paper 1525-b The Mental and the Mound: The Narrative Role of Imagined Burial Mounds in the Post-Classical Íslendingasögur
(Language: English) 
Basil Price, Department of English, Arizona State University 
Index Terms: Anthropology; Language and Literature – Scandinavian
Paper 1525-c Old Age as Disability in Old Norse Sagas?
(Language: English) 
Anna Katharina Heiniger, Faculty of Icelandic & Comparative Cultural Studies, University of Iceland, Reykjavík 
Index Terms: Daily Life; Language and Literature – Scandinavian
 
Abstract The concept of worldbuilding, and the related idea of story-worlds – originally derived from the creation and study of the imaginary worlds of fantasy literature – have been influential tools in the analysis of narrative worlds across literatures. This series of sessions aims to apply these tools to the worlds of the medieval north. Employing an interdisciplinary focus that includes but ultimately goes beyond narrative worlds, they investigate how medieval Scandinavian worlds were built in history, archaeology, and material culture. This first session introduces the concept of worldbuilding and explores different aspects of the way it can be applied to the Íslendingasögur by focusing on non-canonical texts and new theoretical approaches.

 

Session 1610
Title Fertility and Infertility, II: Royal Infertility and Childlessness
Date/Time Thursday 4 July 2019: 11.15-12.45
 
Sponsor Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Exeter
 
Organiser Catherine Rider, Department of History, University of Exeter
 
Moderator/Chair Catherine Rider, Department of History, University of Exeter
 
Paper 1610-a Childlessness: Failure or Virtue – The Case of Count Charles ‘the Good’ of Flanders
(Language: English) 
Martina Häcker, Seminar für Anglistik, Universität Siegen 
Index Terms: Gender Studies; Historiography – Medieval; Sexuality
Paper 1610-b Devotion of a Childless King: Royal Infertility and Religious Patronage in 13th- to 14th-Century Scotland
(Language: English) 
Emma Trivett, School of History, Classics & Archaeology, University of Edinburgh 
Index Terms: Lay Piety; Religious Life; Sexuality; Women’s Studies
Paper 1610-c True Men and Women?: Infertility and Gender Identity of Late Medieval English Monarchs
(Language: English) 
Kristen Geaman, Department of History, University of Toledo, Ohio 
Index Terms: Gender Studies; Lay Piety; Sexuality; Women’s Studies
 
Abstract The history of infertility is a growing area of study, for the Middle Ages and for other periods. Recent work has examined medical and (less often) religious views of infertility, as well as the experiences of those seeking to conceive. This is the second of two sessions that bring together medievalists working on these topics from a range of perspectives. The first session looks at medical and religious writing on infertility, in order to uncover learned writers’ views of the subject and their relationship to practice. This second session looks at some of the best documented cases of infertility, among medieval kings and queens.

 

Session 1625
Title Mental and Material: Building World(s) in the Medieval North, II – Worlds of History
Date/Time Thursday 4 July 2019: 11.15-12.45
 
Organiser Rebecca Merkelbach, Deutsches Seminar / Skandinavistik, Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen
 
Moderator/Chair Rebecca Merkelbach, Deutsches Seminar / Skandinavistik, Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen
 
Paper 1625-a Creating the Court in Skáldatal: The Skalds, Their Poetry, and the World of Scandinavian Kings
(Language: English) 
Anna Solovyeva, Institut for Kommunikation og Kultur, Aarhus Universitet 
Index Terms: Language and Literature – Scandinavian; Literacy and Orality; Manuscripts and Palaeography; Politics and Diplomacy
Paper 1625-b Constructing Settlements: Social Network Analysis and Landnámabók
(Language: English) 
Cassidy Croci, School of English, University of Nottingham 
Index Terms: Geography and Settlement Studies; Language and Literature – Scandinavian
Paper 1625-c Mapping Medical Knowledge in Medieval Scandinavia
(Language: English) 
Sarah Baccianti, School of Arts, English & Languages, Queen’s University Belfast 
Index Terms: Education; Language and Literature – Scandinavian; Medicine; Science
 
Abstract The concept of worldbuilding, and the related idea of story-worlds – originally derived from the creation and study of the imaginary worlds of fantasy literature – have been influential tools in the analysis of narrative worlds across literatures. This series of sessions aims to apply these tools to the worlds of the medieval north. Employing an interdisciplinary focus that includes but ultimately goes beyond narrative worlds, they investigate how medieval Scandinavian worlds were built in history, archaeology and material culture. This second session explores the way the historical worlds of the medieval North are constructed through interaction, examining poetry and the manuscript that preserve it, social networks in settlement narratives, and cultural contacts that shape medical knowledge.

 

Session 1708
Title Only Time Will Tell?: On Prognostic Thinking in Early Medieval Life
Date/Time Thursday 4 July 2019: 14.15-15.45
 
Organiser Ria Paroubek-Groenewoud, Departement Geschiedenis en Kunstgeschiedenis, Universiteit Utrecht
 
Moderator/Chair Joanne Edge, John Rylands Library, University of Manchester
 
Paper 1708-a Thinking Inside the Box?: The Problem of Genre and Prognostic Texts in 8th- and 9th-Century Manuscripts
(Language: English) 
Annemarie Veenstra, Departement Geschiedenis en Kunstgeschiedenis, Universiteit Utrecht 
Index Terms: Computing in Medieval Studies; Historiography – Modern Scholarship; Science
Paper 1708-b A Dark Cloud on the Horizon: On Brontologies, Brontological Thinking, and Thunder as a Predictive Force in the Early Medieval Mind
(Language: English) 
Bram van den Berg, Departement Geschiedenis en Kunstgeschiedenis, Universiteit Utrecht 
Index Terms: Computing in Medieval Studies; Historiography – Medieval
Paper 1708-c Luna VIII: A Medicus curabitur – Prognostic Texts as an Aid for the Medieval Medic
(Language: English) 
Ria Paroubek-Groenewoud, Departement Geschiedenis en Kunstgeschiedenis, Universiteit Utrecht 
Index Terms: Computing in Medieval Studies; Manuscripts and Palaeography; Medicine
 
Abstract What day of the moon is a good day to let blood? What does it mean if you hear thunder on a Tuesday? Do you want to know if your Monday is cursed? Texts that offer this kind of information are known as prognostics. Recent scholarship has stepped away from the notion that these texts are pagan. However, they are often still approached as a clear and defined body of texts; but are they really? This session will break away from this tendency by looking at how prognostic texts, found in manuscripts from the 8th-11th century, function within different intellectual contexts.