New book – Purifier, soigner ou guérir? – Maladies et lieux religieux de la Méditerranée antique à la Normandie médiévale – ed. by Cécile Chapelain de Serevil – Presses Universitaires de Rennes

Purifier, soigner ou guérir? – Maladies et lieux religieux de la Méditerranée antique à la Normandie médiévale

Cécile Chapelain de Serevil (dir.) 

Des biologistes américains ont noté l’existence d’une corrélation entre la présence récurrente d’épidémies infectieuses et l’apparition des religions comme facteurs d’entraide et de regroupement humains. Cette hypothèse invite à réévaluer la place et le rôle des comportements religieux en lien avec les maladies. Il existe toujours une ambiguïté du comportement de la divinité ou du saint qui, à la fois, apporte la maladie et sauve le malade. Ce principe empreint de sacré – maudit et bénit – est rarement abordé dans les travaux historiques. Or, l’attitude des hommes n’est jamais neutre à l’égard des malades. Compassion et dérision semblent recouvrir les deux faces d’une même médaille. Si le corps humain sain est un objet de désir, le corps déformé par la maladie fascine autant qu’il repousse. Aussi, en quête de guérison, le malade s’éloigne dans un sanctuaire pour faire venir le dieu à lui ou solliciter la présence de « morts très spéciaux », les saints. Quelle est la place du soin des malades, des infirmes en situation de handicap au sein des sociétés anciennes et médiévales, dont la force et le courage du guerrier constituent les valeurs dominantes? Quelles ruptures, continuités ou transformations/transmissions, des pratiques de soin, des rites de guérison/purification ou d’éloignement des malades peut-on déceler? Doté d’une documentation exceptionnelle et d’études neuves, le monde anglo-normand forme un point d’ancrage majeur pour conduire une réflexion sur le soin des malades dans l’Occident chrétien. Poser un « regard éloigné » et croisé sur les cultures polythéistes et chrétiennes nécessite l’emploi d’un arsenal maximal de sources, puisé des rives de la Méditerranée à celles de la Manche.
 

Editeur : Pu Rennes (14 mai 2020)
Collection : ARCHEOLOGIE & C
Langue : Français
ISBN-10 : 2753580251
ISBN-13 : 978-2753580251

CFP – Leeds 2020 – (Un)bound Bodies: New Approaches

(Un)bound Bodies: New Approaches (Les corps (non)liés)

 
 
Leeds IMC | 6th-9th July 2020
 
For decades, bodies have been a central framework for historical inquiries. No matter how much we try to distance ourselves from them, bodies remain at the centre and borders of scholarship. Medieval bodies were fluid and contradictory loci: bound and unbound, contained yet susceptible to a host of external physical and invisible forces. Bodily boundaries were paradoxically sharp, debated, and real, yet also fluid, permeable and imaginary.
 
This new strand at IMC 2020 seeks to investigate these ‘real’ and ‘imaginary’ borders of the body and to complicate and critique existing narratives of ‘bound bodies’. As such, this strand is intentionally broad in its scope and embraces innovative and interdisciplinary approaches that push back, and go beyond, established methodologies. 
 
What? Twenty-minute papers; interest in a roundtable discussion also welcome
 
Who? Scholars from all career stages, eras and geographies. ECR and Queer approaches are particularly welcome. 
 
Suggested topics include (but are not limited to): 
 
· Un-binding scholarship: innovative approaches to bodies
 
· Bodily layers: ligaments, nerves, blood, bone, flesh, clothing
 
· Bodies and the cosmos: healing, magical influences, microcosm/macrocosm
 
· Bodies in flux: sensory experience, synaesthesia, bodily passions and emotions, cross dressing
 
· Bodily interactions: homosociality, sexuality, movement, legal systems
 
Please send titles and abstracts (maximum 250 words) together with a short biography and institutional affiliation (where relevant) to Jack Ford (jack.ford.13@ucl.ac.uk) or Lauren Rozenberg (lauren.rozenberg.14@ucl.ac.ukby 15th September.
 
Please also see the attached file for the CfP poster. Anyone applying will have to bear in mind that they will need to be registered to attend the IMC and unfortunately, as a new strand, we cannot cover any registration fees or transportation costs. Further information about the IMC can be found here: https://www.imc.leeds.ac.uk/

CFP – The Senses in Medieval and Renaissance Europe: Hearing and Auditory Perception – Trinity College Dublin 24-25 April 2020

   

The Senses in Medieval and Renaissance Europe: Hearing and Auditory Perception

Trinity College Dublin

24-25 April 2020

Proposals for papers are invited for a conference on The Senses in Medieval and Renaissance Europe: Hearing and Auditory Perception, which aims to provide an international and interdisciplinary forum for researchers with an interest in the history of the senses in the Middle Ages and Renaissance.

manesse_f.-410r

Keynote Speaker:

Professor David Hendy, University of Sussex

Echoes on the Air: How Modern Media Evoke and Dramatize
the Sounds of the Distant Past

The history of the senses is a rapidly expanding field of research. Pioneered in Early Modern and Modern Studies, it is now attracting attention also from Medieval and Renaissance specialists. Preoccupation with the human senses and with divine control over them is evident in a range of narrative texts, scientific treatises, creative literature, as well as the visual arts and music from the pre-modern period. This conference – the second in a series devoted to the five senses – aims to contribute to this expansion by bringing together leading researchers to exchange ideas and approaches.

The conference organisers have signed a five-book contract with Brepols which is based on the theme: ‘The Senses in Medieval and Renaissance Europe’. The proceedings of our 2016 conference, ‘Sight and Visual Perception’, held in University College Dublin, edited by Ann Buckley and Edward Coleman, are due for publication in 2020.

We invite proposals from the full range of disciplines including (but not limited to) history, archaeology, musicology, art history, architecture, literary studies, acoustics, astronomy, physics, medicine. Contributions from established and early-career scholars as well as postgraduates are all equally welcome.

Suggested topics include (but are not limited to):

  • humanly organised sound
  • music (social and religious ritual; art, leisure)
  • musica et scientia
  • sound and social meaning
  • sound and the emotions
  • sound and healing
  • sound and the body
  • soundscapes
  • sound and nature
  • sound and the regulation of time
  • sound and religious experience
  • deafness and its consequences
  • hearing and medicine
  • exploring the physics of sound in the middle ages and renaissance

Titles and abstracts (maximum 300 words) together with a short biography, institutional affiliation (where relevant), and contact details should be sent to medrenforum@gmail.com by 1 December 2019. Proposals for panels are also encouraged.

Registration fee €40 (Students and other concessions: €25)

Click here to download Conference Poster.

Programme

Abstracts

Welcome Pack

Organizing Committee:
Dr Ann Buckley (Trinity College Dublin)
Dr Edward Coleman (University College Dublin)
Dr Carrie Griffin (University of Limerick)
Dr Emer Purcell (National University of Ireland)

Forum for Medieval and Renaissance Studies in Ireland (FMRSI)
Webwww.fmrsi.wordpress.com
Emailmedrenforum@gmail.com

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/ForumMRSI Twitter: @FMRSI

CFP – Gender and History – Special Issue: Health, Healing and Caring

Gender & History is an international journal for research and writing on the history of femininity, masculinity and gender relations. This Call for Papers is aimed at scholars studying any country or region, and any temporal period, including the classical, medieval, early modern, modern, and contemporary periods.

This Special Issue will explore the gendered history of healing and caring from the perspective of the sick and suffering, and various types of healers and caregivers. It aims to move beyond institutional histories of biomedicine, canonical medical knowledge, and allopathic approaches to health. We seek to showcase research that reflects upon the gendered dynamics of palliative care and the formation of diverse communities and economies of health and healing. We recognize that historical reckonings of health and bodily knowledge in many locales have been dominated by sources maintained in state, colonial, and missionary archives, and by notions of medicine shaped in white settler institutions. In an effort to destabilize these reckonings and to uncover marginalized forms of knowledge and practice, we encourage research informed by diverse methodologies and an imaginative approach to source material.

In recent years, medical anthropologists have shed light on the complex and unequal co-production of biomedical knowledge and “traditional” forms of medicine while feminist sociologists have illuminated the gendered dynamics of caregiving and the devaluation of its everyday and emotional labor. How might historians engage these cross-disciplinary methods and insights to reconstruct more nuanced and more expansive histories of healing and caring? What happens to our gendered histories of illness and medicine when we de-naturalize biomedical formations and examine palliative care in addition to therapeutic treatment? How has gender shaped which forms of healing and caring are recognized and institutionalized, and how has such privileging changed over time?

We understand that historically a wide array of people have provided healing and caring including family members, shamans, spirit mediums, healers, Elders, herbalists, diviners, faith healers, and wise-women and men as well as midwives, nurses, aids, and doctors. Their practices have ranged from diagnosing illnesses, administering medicines, and performing procedures to offering spiritual and psychological counsel. They have also included forms of body work such as grooming, feeding, bathing, massage and manipulation, and handling the dead.

Papers are invited from established scholars as well as new, emerging, and unaffiliated scholars who consider a variety of historical moments and locations, or transnational and even global processes related to themes such as the following:

●Intersectional approaches that examine how social identities and inequalities rooted in gender,race, ethnicity, sexuality, class, religion, and nationality have long shaped people’s access tohealth resources and care and, in turn, given rise to disparate patterns and experiences of well-being and illness.

●Reconstruction of deep histories of gendered healing and caring, extending back well before thetwentieth century, that reveal how healing and caring practices have been central concerns forboth individuals and societies and how those concerns have often animated and reconfiguredcultural institutions, political ideologies, and economic relations and markets.

●Consideration of the connections and tensions between various modes of healing and palliation,and how those relations have informed the frequently gendered and racialized separation of“professional” and “modern” medicine from modes designated as “traditional,” “informal,”“alternative,” or “home-based.”

●Examination of how people have transmitted healing and caring epistemologies and practicesacross generations and geographic distances, including how women have sought to maintain orassert control over their health and how various archives have worked both to represent andobscure those efforts.

●Engagement with concepts from disability studies, queer theory, and crip theory to betterunderstand the history of illnesses and diseases that have often been both gendered andstigmatized such as depression, hysteria, reproductive maladies, infertility, and sexuallytransmitted infections.

Interested individuals are asked to submit 500-word abstracts, a brief biography (250 words), and a cv by 31 August 2019 at 5pm PDT for consideration. Abstracts will be reviewed by the guest editors and successful proponents will participate in a symposium at Vancouver Island University in British Columbia, Canada, on 8 May 2020. Papers must be submitted six weeks prior to the symposium. Papers should be 6000-8000 words in length. After the symposium, papers will go through the journal’s peer review system. As with any article, there is no guarantee of publication. The editors are in the process of applying for funding to defray the cost of the travel to the symposium for new, emerging, and unaffiliated scholars. Please send abstracts, biographies, and CVs by email to genderhistory@viu.ca or by mail to The Editors, Gender & History, Vancouver Island University, 900 Fifth Street, Nanaimo, BC V9R 5S5. The Special Issue will be edited by Drs. Kristin Burnett, Sara Ritchey, and Lynn M. Thomas.

Special Issue Timeline Abstracts to SI editors — 31 August 2019 Papers circulated to symposium participants — 15 March 2020 Symposium at Vancouver Island University (Nanaimo, British Columbia) — 8 May 2020Full submissions to SI editors (papers submitted on ScholarOne) for peer review — 31 August, 2020 Revised submissions (and any image permissions) to SI editors — 31 May 2021 Publication — October 2021

IMC Leeds 2020 – Dis/ability in the medieval North

Call for papers: IMC Leeds 2020
6–9 July, 2020
Dis/ability in the medieval North
Organizers: Christopher Crocker and
Yoav Tirosh (University of Iceland)

In line with the now commonly accepted premise that disability is a multi-factorial phenomenon, scholars have come to realise that there can be no fixed, acultural and/or atemporal definition of disability. Scholars today commonly make use of the concepts of ‘embodied difference’ and ‘marked or unusual bodies’ as they do not imply pre-defined notions of disability. Although disability is negotiated with the body as a central platform, scholars are not limited to speaking only of the physicality of bodies. Rather the body materialises and translates physical, psychic, and intellectual differences in ways that societies can identify them as deviations from what is considered ‘normal’ in specific temporal contexts. Indeed, the phenomenon of disability cannot be studied without understanding how the notions of ‘ability’ and ‘normal’ are conceptualized. The term ‘dis/ability’ can thus be used to remind us that it is not possible to understand one without recognizing the other.


Within this theoretical context, we invite paper proposals on the topic of Dis/ability in the Medieval North for a series of sessions of 15–20-minute papers to be held at the International Medieval Congress (IMC) 2020 at the University of Leeds (6–9 July 2020). The study of disability intrinsically crosses disciplinary boundaries and so we welcome contributions from a range of disciplines. In the context of the medieval North, suggested topics include, but are not limited to:
▪ Approaches to the experience of dis/ability through sources, methodology, and narrative
▪ Dis/ability and society, religion, law or medical knowledge
▪ Intersections of dis/ability with age, gender, social status, etc.
▪ Dis/ability, assistive technology, and care
▪ Terminology or language of dis/ability


We invite abstracts of 200–300 words to be sent to cwe1@hi.is by August 30, 2019, with a view to confirming participants in the sessions by mid-September. Please direct any queries to cwe1@hi.is or tiroshyoav@yahoo.com.


The proposed sessions emerge from the interdisciplinary research project Disability before disability (Icel. Fötlun fyrir tíma fötlunar) situated at the Centre for Disability Studies at the University of Iceland and supported by the Icelandic Research fund (Icel. Rannsóknasjóður) Grant of Excellence No 173655-05.