Must see sessions on Disability History – International Medieval Congress – Leeds – 2018 2-5 July 2018

Must see ! sessions on Disability History –

International Medieval Congress –

Leeds – 2018 2-5 July 2018

Session 150
Title Scientific, Empirical, Biblical, and Hagiographical Knowledge in the Middle Ages, I: Astronomy, Computus, and Medicine
Date/Time Monday 2 July 2018: 11.15-12.45
Sponsor School of Arts, English & Languages, Queen’s University Belfast
Organiser Sarah Baccianti, School of Arts, English & Languages, Queen’s University Belfast
Moderator/Chair Ciaran Arthur, School of Arts, English & Languages, Queen’s University Belfast
Paper 150-a Anglo-Saxons’ Visions of Modern Science
(Language: English)
Marilina Cesario, School of Arts, English & Languages, Queen’s University Belfast
Pedro Lacerda, School of Mathematics & Physics, Queen’s University Belfast
Index Terms: Historiography – Medieval; Language and Literature – Old English; Science
Paper 150-b Why Write Computus in English?: Vernacularity and Computistical Inquiry
(Language: English)
Rebecca Stephenson, School of English, Drama & Film, University College Dublin
Index Terms: Language and Literature – Old English; Literacy and Orality; Science
Paper 150-c Pus, Boils, and Amputations: Surgery in Medieval Scandinavia
(Language: English)
Sarah Baccianti, School of Arts, English & Languages, Queen’s University Belfast
Index Terms: Language and Literature – Scandinavian; Medicine
Abstract This session will focus on attitudes to knowledge, which constitutes one of the most complex concepts in the Middle Ages, as suggested by the vast semantic range of the Latin terms commonly translated as ‘knowledge’, including scientia, cognitio, notitia, eruditio and sapientia.
It will consider how scientia was transmitted and manipulated in the Middle Ages by looking at diverse sources ranging from astronomical, computistical, and mechanical texts (medicine, agriculture, and navigation), maps and the environment, and liturgical and hagiographical compositions from England, Scandinavia, and the Continent. Furthermore it will discuss the ways in which scientific knowledge and biblical and hagiographical learning were used to exercise power and the role that beliefs played in shaping and promoting scientific thinking.
Session 339
Title Memory in the Angevin World
Date/Time Monday 2 July 2018: 16.30-18.00
Sponsor Angevin World Network
Organiser Michael Staunton, School of History, University College Dublin
Moderator/Chair Stephen Church, Department of History, King’s College London
Paper 339-a Remembering the Conquest of Ireland in the Angevin World
(Language: English)
Colin Veach, School of Histories, Languages & Cultures, University of Hull
Index Terms: Historiography – Medieval; Mentalities; Military History
Paper 339-b Remembering Illness in the Angevin World: Variations of Familial Memory in the Miracle Accounts of Gilbert of Sempringham
(Language: English)
Krystal Carmichael, School of History, University College Dublin
Index Terms: Hagiography; Historiography – Medieval; Medicine; Mentalities
Paper 339-c Remembering the Loss of Normandy
(Language: English)
Michael Staunton, School of History, University College Dublin
Index Terms: Historiography – Medieval; Mentalities; Military History
Abstract This session addresses the ways in which events were remembered in the lands ruled by the Angevin kings of England (c. 1154 – c. 1216), a time of much innovation and variety in the recording and remembering of the past. Paper (a) looks at how the invasion of Ireland was remembered outside Ireland, in Latin and vernacular texts. Paper (b) discusses disputed memories of miracles in hagiographical texts, particularly those associated with Gilbert of Sempringham. Paper (c) examines the divergent ways in which King John’s loss of Normandy was remembered across the ‘Angevin empire’.

 

Session 399
Title #disIMC: Current Challenges to Accessibility and Ways Forward – A Round Table Discussion
Date/Time Monday 2 July 2018: 16.30-18.00
Sponsor Medievalists with Disabilities Network
Organiser Alexandra R. A. Lee, Department of Italian, University College London
Moderator/Chair Alexandra R. A. Lee, Department of Italian, University College London
Abstract At the IMC 2017, Medievalists with Disabilities hosted its first event. #disIMC was a ‘bring your own lunch’ affair, slotted into the timetable at the last minute. It was a great success and marked the beginning of the Medievalists with Disabilities (#dismed) network.

This round table discussion will discuss accessibility in higher education and ways that we can address issues. We take the term disabilities in the broadest possible sense, incorporating invisible and visible conditions, chronic illness, and mental health, to name but a few. Panellists will address issues individuals have overcome in Higher Education, discuss what it is like to be in HE with a disability/chronic condition, and pinpoint issues that need further attention.

Participants include Joanne Edge (University of Cambridge), Edward Mills (University of Exeter), Emma Osborne (University of Glasgow), Alicia Spencer-Hall (University College London), and Therron Welstead (University of Wales Trinity Saint David).

 

Session 604
Title New Voices in Anglo-Saxon Studies, I
Date/Time Tuesday 3 July 2018: 11.15-12.45
Sponsor International Society of Anglo-Saxonists
Organiser Megan Cavell, Department of English Literature, University of Birmingham
Moderator/Chair Damian Fleming, Department of English & Linguistics, Indiana University-Purdue University, Fort Wayne
Paper 604-a ‘Se bið mihtigre se ðe gæð þonne se þe crypð’: Metaphoric Disability in the Old English Boethius
(Language: English)
Leah Pope Parker, English Department, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Index Terms: Language and Literature – Old English; Philosophy; Social History
Paper 604-b Women, Adornment, and Social Change: Necklaces in 7th-Century Anglo-Saxon England
(Language: English)
Katie Haworth, Department of Archaeology, Durham University
Index Terms: Archaeology – Artefacts; Women’s Studies
Paper 604-c Quid est vox?: Mystery and Mysticism
(Language: English)
Matthew Coker, St Hilda’s College, University of Oxford
Index Terms: Language and Literature – Celtic; Language and Literature – Latin; Language and Literature – Old English; Learning (The Classical Inheritance)
Abstract The New Voices sessions are intended for all scholars new to the field of Anglo-Saxon studies, including research students, newly-appointed lecturers, and anyone who has only recently begun to work in this area. They provide an interdisciplinary perspective and showcase new work in the field. All submissions are reviewed by the International Society of Anglo-Saxonists (ISAS), who determine the ultimate selection of papers through a process of blind peer review. This particular session focuses on bodies.

 

Session 1047
Title Reputation, Emotion, and Remembering Death and Illness
Date/Time Wednesday 4 July 2018: 09.00-10.30
Sponsor Prato Consortium for Medieval & Renaissance Studies, Monash University, Victoria
Organiser Peter Francis Howard, Centre for Medieval & Renaissance Studies, Monash University, Victoria
Moderator/Chair John Henderson, Department of History, Classics & Archaeology, Birkbeck, University of London / School of Philosophical , Historical & International Studies , Monash University
Paper 1047-a Recording a Place of Emotions and Violence: Mapping the Coronial Deaths of Medieval Oxfordshire
(Language: English)
Annie Blachly, Centre for Medieval & Renaissance Studies, Monash University, Victoria
Index Terms: Archives and Sources; Computing in Medieval Studies; Social History
Paper 1047-b The Insania and Piety of Herimann of Nevers: Remembering a Mentally Ill Carolingian Bishop
(Language: English)
Rachel Stone, Department of History, King’s College London / Learning Resources & Service Excellence, University of Bedfordshire
Index Terms: Ecclesiastical History; Medicine; Mentalities
Paper 1047-c Medical Memory of Sense and Emotion by Baverio de’Bonetti (d. 1480): A Physician of Bologna
(Language: English)
Gordon Whyte, School of Philosophical, Historical & International Studies, Monash University, Victoria
Index Terms: Medicine; Social History
Abstract Serious illness and sudden or violent death were familiar aspects of medieval life, but how did people choose to remember such experiences? Linked to the Body in the City Project, this session draws on a variety of different sources from across the Middle Ages recording illness and death, including medical treatises, coroners’ rolls, and forms of religious commemoration. The papers explore how the messy experiences of illness and death, and the complex emotions of those involved, could be interpreted and turned into more formal accounts of events, suitable for permanent record.

 

Session 1108
Title Sanctifying the Crip, Cripping the Sacred: Disability, Holiness, and Embodied Knowledge
Date/Time Wednesday 4 July 2018: 11.15-12.45
Sponsor Hagiography Society
Organiser Alicia Spencer-Hall, School of Languages, Linguistics & Film, Queen Mary, University of London
Moderator/Chair Alicia Spencer-Hall, School of Languages, Linguistics & Film, Queen Mary, University of London
Paper 1108-a Hildegard of Bingen’s Hagiography: The Community of Heaven and Earth and the Social Model of Disability
(Language: English)
Stephen Marc D’Evelyn, School for Policy Studies, University of Bristol
Index Terms: Gender Studies; Hagiography; Religious Life; Theology
Paper 1108-b Translations of (Dis)Ability, Disease, and Digestion in The Book of Margery Kempe
(Language: English)
Katherine Gubbels, English Department, Metropolitan Community College, Nebraska
Index Terms: Gender Studies; Hagiography; Medicine; Theology
Paper 1108-c Disability and Power in the Early Lives of St Francis of Assisi
(Language: English)
Donna Trembinski, Department of History, St Francis Xavier University, Nova Scotia
Index Terms: Gender Studies; Hagiography; Religious Life; Theology
Paper 1108-d Bodily Arithmetic: Physical and Sacred Identity in Tristan de Nanteuil
(Language: English)
Blake Gutt, Department of French, University of Cambridge
Index Terms: Gender Studies; Hagiography; Religious Life; Theology
Abstract A vast amount of our knowledge of the experience of impairment in the Middle Ages comes from religious works. An important manifestation of a presumptive saint’s holiness was their capacity to perform mystically curative healings to return their devotees to an able-bodied state. But medieval saints did not just tend to those with impairment. Some saints were themselves explicitly physically impaired, either permanently or temporarily. Saints’ ascetic self-mortification could also lead to impairment. In all instances, the saint’s body is divergent to the able-bodied norm of those around them, the non-saintly. It operates as a vector of the divine in miraculous healing of others; a receptacle of the divine in their ability to withstand extreme ascetic degradation. What is at stake if we consider the medieval saint’s body as impaired, disabled, emphatically non-able-bodied?

Ultimately, this panel seeks to interrogate the ways in which the body – be that the saintly body, the disabled body, and/or the saintly and disabled body – acts as a site of embodied knowledge. More specifically, it aims to consider the body as a site of somatic memorialization: the corporeal matter of memory formation, memory retention, and temporal disturbance. How do impairments – writ on holy and profane bodies alike – bear witness to events, subject positions, even evanescent truths? And what does this form of productive bodily witnessing bring to bear on the concept of disability itself? This panel is comprised of four 15-minute papers.

More infos on the IMC Leeds website !

Sessions on Disability in the Middle Ages at ICMS Kalamazoo – 10/13 may 2018

Sessions on Disability in the Middle Ages at ICMS Kalamazoo

10/13 may 2018

 

Thursday 10 am

33 – BERNHARD 204
Medicine and Magic I: Healing Bodies
Sponsor: Societas Magica
Organizer: Marla Segol, Univ. at Buffalo
Presider: David Porreca, Univ. of Waterloo
1. Eating Words: Medical Charms as Healing Relics in Medieval England
Katherine Hindley, Nanyang Technological Univ.
2. Magical Plants in the Healing Arts
Helga Ruppe, Western Univ.
3. Occult Diagnosis: Physiognomy and the Medical Academy
Kira L. Robison, Univ. of Tennessee–Chattanooga

 

Thursday 1:30 pm

80 – BERNHARD 204
Medicine and Magic II: Healing Souls
Sponsor: Societas Magica
Organizer: Marla Segol, Univ. at Buffalo
Presider: Phillip A. Bernhardt-House, Skagit Valley College–Whidbey Island
1. Healing-Place for the Soul: Magic and Medicine in the Ancient Egyptian Library
Mark Roblee, Univ. of Massachusetts–Amherst
2. Embryologies: Medical and Ritual
Marla Segol
3. A Thirteenth-Century Version of the Almandal : Newly Discovered and Described for the First Time
Vajra Regan, Univ. of Toronto

 

Thursday 3:30

 

117 – SCHNEIDER 1255
A Science of the Human: Medical Discourse as a Way of Knowing
Sponsor: Italians and Italianists at Kalamazoo
Organizer: Matteo Pace, Columbia Univ.
Presider: Matteo Pace
1. Human Nature in, instead of beyond, Nature: A Reading of the Philosophical
Implications of the Commedia ’s Embryology
Humberto Ballesteros, Columbia Univ.
2. Dante and Medieval Medicine: Charting Connections between the Commedia and His Other Works
Paola Ureni, College of Staten Island and Graduate Center, CUNY
3. Petrarca and Botany: A Discourse on Healing
Theresa Holler, Univ. Bern
——————-
Friday, May 11 – 8:30 a.m.
East Ballroom, Bernhard Center
“Salvation is Medicine” – The Medieval Production and Gendered Erasures of
Therapeutic Knowledge
By Sara Ritchey (Univ. of Tennessee–Knoxville)
Sponsored by the Medieval Academy of America

 

Friday 10 am

211 – BERNHARD BROWN & GOLD ROOM
Medical Texts in Manuscript Culture
Sponsor: Medieval Academy of America
Organizer: Monica H. Green, Arizona State Univ.; Sara Ritchey, Univ. of
Tennesee–Knoxville
Presider: Monica H. Green
1. How to Read Bodies: Medicine, Mary, and Miracles in an Anglo-Norman Manuscript
Winston Black, Assumption College
2. Palliative Care for Life with Bodleian Library, Canonici Misc. 74
Amy V. Ogden, Univ. of Virginia
3. Healing through Words: Amulets, Formulae, and Spells in Medieval Hebrew Manuscripts on Women’s Health Care
Carmen Caballero Navas, Univ. de Granada

 

212 – SANGREN 1320
Vulnerability in the Middle Ages
Organizer: Hollis Shaul, Princeton Univ.
Presider: Elise Wang, Duke Univ.
1. The Wounded Knight-Healer: Corporeal Communities in the Old French Lancelot Grail
Mae Lyons-Penner, Stanford Univ.
2. Bodies before the Law: Ordeal and Legal Vulnerability in Medieval Iberia
Rachel Q. Welsh, New York Univ.
3. Peasant Perspectives on Protection and Vulnerability
Abigail Sargent, Princeton Univ.
4. Voices of the Vulnerable: Persuasion and Power in Robert Henryson’s Moral Fables
Emily Mahan, Univ. of Notre Dame

 

Friday – 1:30 PM

241 – SCHNEIDER 1220
Inclusion and Exclusion in the Middle Ages I
Sponsor: Program in Medieval Studies, Princeton Univ.
Organizer: Helmut Reimitz, Princeton Univ.
Presider: William Chester Jordan, Princeton Univ.
1. Urban Violence: Riot Culture and Dynamics in Late Antique Eastern
David A. Heayn, Graduate Center, CUNY
2. Christians under Islamic Rule: The Benefits of Collaboration and Inclusion
Chris Prejean, Univ. of California–Los Angeles
3. Inclusivity and Exclusivity in the Transmission of Poetic Knowledge in Early
Medieval Japan
Malgorzata Citko, Univ. of Hawaii–Manoa
4. At the Crossroads of Kingship and Disability: The Case of Baldwin IV of Jerusalem
Samantha Summers, Queen’s Univ. Kingston

 

267 – BERNHARD 212
Medicine in Cities: Public Health and Medical Professions
Sponsor: Medica: The Society for the Study of Healing in the Middle Ages
Organizer: William H. York, Portland State Univ.
Presider: William H. York
1. Minds in the Gutter: Plague, Sin, and Blame in Late Medieval Valencia
Abigail Agresta, Queen’s Univ. Kingston
2. Leprosy and Society in Medieval Bologna, 1100–1350
Courtney A. Krolikoski, McGill Univ.
3. “Per Modum Radicis”: Cultural Webs between Physicians and Poets in Duecento Bologna
Matteo Pace, Columbia Univ.
4. Pharmacy and Health Care in Late Byzantine Constantinople
Petros Bouras-Vallianatos, King’s College London

 

274 – SANGREN 1740
Tenth Anniversary Roundtable: Medieval Disability Studies, Then and Now (A Roundtable)
Sponsor: Society for the Study of Disability in the Middle Ages
Organizer: Joshua Eyler, Rice Univ.
Presider: Cameron Hunt McNabb, Southeastern Univ.
1. Survival
Christopher Baswell, Barnard College
2. Assessing the State of Medieval Disability Studies (by Editing a Scholarly Collection)
Kisha G. Tracy, Fitchburg State Univ.; John P. Sexton, Bridgewater State Univ.
3. Medieval Disability, or, What We Would Call Disability Today
Leah Pope Parker, Univ. of Wisconsin–Madison
4. Where There Were Few, Now There Are Many: The Future of Medieval Disability Studies?
Wendy J. Turner, Augusta Univ.
5. From Saint to Supercrip: Tracing the Inspiration Narrative from the Middle Ages to Modernity
Jessica Chace, New York Univ.
6. The Terms We Use
Joshua Eyler
7. Medieval Disability Studies: Looking Forward, Looking Back
Tory V. Pearman, Miami Univ. Hamilton

 

Friday 3:30 pm

 

330 – SANGREN 1740
Invisible Disabilities
Sponsor: Society for the Study of Disability in the Middle Ages
Organizer: Joshua Eyler, Rice Univ.
Presider: Joshua Eyler
1. Disabling Pride in the Pricke of Conscience
Michael Calabrese, California State Univ.–Los Angeles
2. Invisible and Intermittent: Markedness, Loss of Mind, and Communities in Later Medieval Miracle Stories
Leigh Ann Craig, Virginia Commonwealth Univ.
3. Deafness: Invisibility as Feignability, Silence as Affirmation
Julie Singer, Washington Univ. in St. Louis

 

324 – BERNHARD 212
Military Medicine: Wounds and Disease in Warfare
Sponsor: Medica: The Society for the Study of Healing in the Middle Ages
Organizer: William H. York, Portland State Univ.
Presider: Linda M. Keyser, Medica
1. Early Use of Medical Triage in the Saga of Saint Olaf
Theodore Cunningham, School of Medicine, Western Michigan Univ.
2. Controversial Wound Treatment by Three Medieval Surgeons: Hugh of Lucca,
Theodoric of Cervia, and Henry of Mondeville
Leigh Whaley, Acadia Univ.
3. Plague and the Great Company of 1361
Nicole Archambeau, Colorado State Univ.

 

Saturday 1:30

 

399 – VALLEY 2 GARNEAU LOUNGE
Corruption of Manly Men in Late Medieval England
Sponsor: Medieval Association of the Midwest (MAM)
Organizer: Matthew O’Donnell, Indiana Univ.–Bloomington
Presider: Matthew O’Donnell
1. “He shall nat be hole longe afftir”: Disabling Gawain in Le Morte Darthur
Kristin Bovaird-Abbo, Univ. of Northern Colorado
2. “Swiche Werk”: Performing Masculinity in Sir Orfeo
Walter Wadiak, Lafayette College
3. What Do Men Really Want? Desire in Sir Gawain and the Green Knight
Mickey Sweeney, Dominican Univ.

Disability in Latin Medieval Philosophy and Theology Disability in Latin Medieval Philosophy and Theology conference – April 26–28, 2018 – Notre Dame University

Disability in Latin Medieval Philosophy and Theology Disability in Latin Medieval Philosophy and Theology conference

April 26–28, 2018

McKenna Hall Notre Dame Conference Center

Programme :

Organizers:     Prof. Richard Cross (richard.cross@nd.edu)

Prof. Scott M. Williams (swillia8@unca.edu)

 

Thursday, April 26th, 2018

3:00-3:30pm    Coffee & Snacks

 

3:30-4:50pm  –  Kevin Timpe, “Thomas Aquinas on Disability” (Calvin College)

Chair: Christina van Dyke (Calvin College)

Commentator: Richard Cross (University of Notre Dame)

 

Friday, April 27th, 2018

8:15-9:00am    Breakfast & Coffee for All

 

9:00-10:20am  –  Gloria Frost, “Congenital Disabilities” (University of St. Thomas)  (via Skype)

Chair: Miguel Romero (Salve Regina University)

Commentator: Scott M. Williams (UNC Asheville)

 

10:35-11:55am  –  John Slotemaker, “Aquinas and Ockham on the Imago Dei and Intellectual Disabilities”

Chair: Mark K. Spencer (University of St. Thomas)

Commentator: Miguel Romero (Salve Regina University)

 

12-1:30pm    Lunch for all

 

1:30-2:50pm  –  Scott M. Williams, “Ableism, Medieval Concepts of Personhood, and Imago Dei Trinitatis

Chair: Richard Cross (University of Notre Dame)

Commentator: John Slotemaker (Fairfield University)

 

3:05-4:25pm  –  Miguel Romero, “Interpreting amentia in the Aristotelian-Thomistic Tradition: 16th Century Spanish Colonialism and the Disappearance of a Latin Medieval Account of Cognitive Impairment”

Chair: Thomas Ward (Baylor University)

Commentator: Mark K. Spencer (University of St. Thomas)

 

 

Saturday, April 28th, 2018

8:15-9:00am    Breakfast & Coffee for All

 

9:00-10:20am  –  Christina van Dyke, “Taking the ‘Dis’ out of Disability: Martyrs, Mystics, and Mothers in the Middle Ages” (Calvin College)

Chair: Kevin Timpe (Calvin College)

Commentator: Scott M. Williams (UNC Asheville)

 

10:35-11:55am  –  Mark K. Spencer, “Separated Souls: Disability in the Intermediate State”

Chair: Richard Cross (University of Notre Dame)

Commentator: Thomas Ward (Baylor University)

 

12-1:30pm    Lunch for all

 

1:30-2:50pm  –  Richard Cross, “Disabilities in Heaven”

Chair: Scott M. Williams (UNC Asheville)

Commentator: Christina van Dyke (Calvin College)

 

3:05-4:25pm – Thomas Ward, “Thomas Aquinas and Duns Scotus: Disabilities and the Beatific Vision”

Chair: John Slotemaker (Fairfield University)

Commentator: Kevin Timpe (Calvin College)

 

4:35-5:15 – Closing Panel Session with Conference Speakers

Chair: Scott M. Williams (UNC Asheville)

More infos on the university of Notre Dame website.

Journée d’étude – « Soigner au Moyen Âge », le 9 janvier 2018 à l’espace Mendès France de Poitiers

Soigner au Moyen Âge

9 Janvier 2018 à  10 h 00

POITIERS (86) | Espace Mendès France

Journée d’études sous la direction scientifique de Laurence Moulinier-Brogi, professeur d’histoire médiévale, université Lumière-Lyon 2, membre du CIHAM-UMR 5648.

9h30 – Accueil

10h-10h30 – Mot de bienvenue par Didier Moreau, directeur de l’Espace Mendès France et introduction par Martin Aurell, directeur du Centre d’études supérieures de civilisation médiévale (CESCM), université de Poitiers et Laurence Moulinier-Brogi

10h30-11h15Les formes de la relation patient-médecin au Moyen Âge par Marilyn Nicoud, professeur d’Histoire médiévale, université d’Avignon et des Pays du Vaucluse, CIHAM-UMR 5648

11h15-11h30 – Questions

11h30-12h15Soigner du poison à la fin du Moyen Âge. Des écrits spécialisés ? par Franck Collard, professeur d’Histoire médiévale, université Paris-Nanterre, CHISCO-EA 1587

12h15-12h30 – Questions

12h30 – Déjeuner

14h-14h45Le rôle du vin dans la médecine médiévale par Azélina Jaboulet-Vercherre, docteur en Histoire, EPHE, IVe Section, Visiting Professor, IEP, Paris

14h45-15h – Questions

15h-15h45Soigner et transmettre au XIIe siècle : « magister Egidius » par Mireille Ausécache, docteur en Histoire, EPHE, IVe Section

15h45-16h – Questions

16h-16h15 – Pause

16h15-17hErreurs médicales, échecs et tromperies par Laurence Moulinier-Brogi, professeur d’histoire médiévale, université Lumière-Lyon 2, membre du CIHAM-UMR 5648

17h15-17h30 – Conclusion

En partenariat avec le Centre d’études supérieures de civilisation médiévale (CESCM) de l’université de Poitiers dans le cadre de l’Atelier interdisciplinaire.

Information à retrouver sur le site web de l’espace Mendès France.

Meeting – Neuro-handwriting analysis: Where the Medieval and the 21st Century Collide by The Trinity Long Room Hub, Arts and Humanities Research Institute – 18th january

Description

Presenters: Dr Deborah Thorpe (TCD), Professor Stephen Smith (University of York, UK), Dr Márjory Da Costa-Abreu (DIMAp/UFRN, Brazil)

Bios:
Dr Deborah Thorpe is a Trinity Long Room Hub Marie Skłodowska-Curie Cofund Fellow. Trained as a palaeographer and a medical historian, she uses a combination of historical handwriting analysis and neurological insight to analyse the impact of ageing and age-related medical disorders on medieval script.

Professor Stephen Smith is a professor in the Department of Electronic Engineering at the University of York. His research is centred on developing evolutionary algorithms, a form of artificial intelligence, and applying them to the diagnosis and monitoring of neurological conditions such as Parkinson’s through the analysis of patients’ movements. Stephen is also co-founder and director of ClearSky Medical Diagnostics Ltd., a university spin-out company set up with the assistance of the Royal Academy of Engineering that markets clinically validated medical devices, developed from his research. Stephen is a Chartered Engineer and a Fellow of the British Computer Society.

Dr. Márjory Da Costa-Abreu is a lecturer in Artificial Intelligence at DIMAp/UFRN. She has a PhD in Electronic Engineering from the University of Kent (UK) and a MSc in Computer Science from UFRN (BR). She has experience in Biometrics analysis and identity prediction, forensics, the effects of ageing in biometrics and soft-biometric prediction techniques.

More info on Evenbrite website.