CFP: Disability Cluster for Yearbook of Langland Studies 35 (2021) – Disability in Pierce Plowman

CFP: Disability Cluster for Yearbook of Langland Studies 35 (2021)


This special cluster will explore the representations of disability and impairment in Piers Plowman. Langland reveals the ambivalent and multifaceted attitude toward disability and impairment in the 14th century. Characters in the poem often treat disabled figures with either love or skepticism. On one hand, those who are too infirm to work are excused from the demands of labor, and are deemed worthy of charity and God’s love. On the other, there are « faitours » who readily assume the guise of impairment in order to deceive and evade the duty to work. Will himself is interrogated by Reason in the C-Text about his inability to work, and he cites his own embodied difference, being too tall, as a justification. This cluster invites essays that examine disability in Piers Plowman from a variety of methodological approaches. Are there different representations of disability across the versions of the poem? How do representations of disability in the poem intersect with legal, theological, or social concerns in the 14th century? What is the role of physical, cognitive, or sensory impairment in the poem? How can we put the poem into conversation with Disability Studies? How does a consideration of disability in Piers Plowman reorient or contribute to current work on Langland? To medieval Disability Studies?


Submissions are due to the cluster editor, Richard Godden (rgoddenl@lsu.edu), by 30 September, 2020.

CFP – Alter 2020 Conference – 8th to 10th July in Rennes (France)

The Alter conference is directed at everyone involved in human and social science research on disability and the loss of autonomy: including work that addresses conceptional and organisational aspects of research, field research, scientific production, qualitative and quantitative methods, etc. Responses about all social fields are welcome (education, employment, culture and recreation, housing, transport, human and technical assistance, political participation, emotional and sexual life, etc.).

This 9th conference aims to discuss the construction of normality and, more broadly, the system of thought that structures our societies in which being “able” is the norm in the sense of both the most widespread and the most desirable situation. The aim of this critical perspective is therefore to highlight how our societies are structured in relation to the notion of the able individual. While the recent call to build inclusive societies would appear to herald a radical turning point, what is the reality? Have we truly finished with representations of disability that tend towards the negative, the defective or even the tragic? To what extend are the “heroized” figures of disability, omnipresent in the public space, perpetrating the representation of disability as a deviation from the norm? Some researchers and activists refer to this dominant construction of norm and disability as the notion of ableism. How does the research contribute to this analysis of the norm(s) and how can we take it into account in the way we conduct our own researches?

Deadline for the call for proposals<https://alterconf2020.sciencesconf.org/resource/page/id/4> : 20th January 2020.  Submission on the website https://alterconf2020.sciencesconf.org<https://alterconf2020.sciencesconf.org/>

To submit your proposal, please create your sciencesconf account. This account gives you access to the Sciencesconf platform and all the sites of the conference: Sciencesconf-Registration<https://www.sciencesconf.org/user/createaccount?lang=en>.

INFO : The deadline for submission of communication proposals to the 9th ALTER conference (EHESP Rennes, 8-10 July 2020) has been extended to 2 February 2020.

_______________________

 

La Conférence Alter s’adresse à tous ceux et celles qui sont engagé·e·s dans les recherches en sciences humaines et sociales sur le handicap et la perte d’autonomie : conception et animation de la recherche, enquête de terrain, valorisation scientifique, etc. Les réponses pourront s’inscrire dans l’ensemble des domaines sociaux (éducation, emploi, culture et loisirs, logement, transports, aides humaines et techniques, participation politique, vie affective et sexuelle, etc.).

Cette 9ème Conférence Alter propose d’interroger la construction de la normalité et, plus globalement, le système de pensée qui structure nos sociétés, selon lequel être « valide » serait la norme, au double sens de la situation la plus répandue et la plus souhaitable. Cette perspective critique entend ainsi mettre en évidence la manière dont nos sociétés sont structurellement construites en référence à cette figure de l’individu valide. Si l’injonction récente à construire des sociétés inclusives semble signaler un tournant radical, qu’en est-il concrètement ? En a-t-on réellement fini avec les représentations tendanciellement négatives, défectives, voire tragiques, du handicap ?  Les figures « héroïsées » du handicap, devenues omniprésentes dans l’espace public, ne prolongent-elles pas (en les inversant) ces approches du handicap comme écart à la norme ? Certains chercheurs et militants désignent cette construction dominante de la norme et du handicap par la notion de validisme (ableism). Comment les recherches contribuent-elles à cette analyse de la norme/des normes et comment pouvons-nous en tenir compte dans la manière dont nous conduisons nos recherches ?

Les propositions sont attendues pour le 2 février 2020. Elles doivent être déposées sur le site https://alterconf2020.sciencesconf.org (Il est pour cela nécessaire de se créer un compte sciencesconf ou de s’y connecter).

« Monsters and problematic identities » – graduate student conference – The Medieval and Renaissance Student Association (MaRSA) of California State University, Long Beach

MONSTERS AND PROBLEMATIC IDENTITIES


The Medieval and Renaissance Student Association (MaRSA) of California State University, Long Beach is seeking individual papers as well as panel submissions for their graduate student conference.

The conference will be held at the Karl Anatol Center on the campus of CSULB on March I2th, 2020. Medieval and Renaissance monstrosity and identities. As an interdisciplinary conference, we welcome submissions from a wide array of disciplines focusing on the art, literature, and history of the period. Paper and panel topics might address issues (but are not limited to) the following:
Monsters es the other (theories of otherness)

Eco-critIcism and Monsters

Nationalism and Monsters

Identity formation

  • Gender
  • Race
  • Sexuality
  • Religious identity

Psychoanalysis (historical actors)

Post/Modern

Medievalism Fantasy Monsters

  • Zombies
  • Ghosts
  • Dragons
  • Fairies
  • Demons
  • Giants
  • Ogres
  • Werewolves (shapeshifters)
  • Dwarves

Cultural/Social Isolation (outlaw)/ Marginalization

Travel Literature, and Monsters

Colonialism/ Imperialism Trans-AtiaMic

Disabilities (dwarves)

Medieval Imaginary

Monstrous Bodies

Witchcraft (magic)

Ideological Appropriation

 

PRESENTATIONS SHOULD RUN FOR APPROXIMATELY 15 MINUTES. PLEASE SUBMIT ABSTRACTS OF NO MORE THAN 300 WORDS ALONG WITH A CURRENT 1 PAGE CV BY EMAIL TO MEDREN.CSULB@GMAIL.COM BY FEBRUARY 6TH, 2020.

 

 

CFP – Leeds 2020 – (Un)bound Bodies: New Approaches

(Un)bound Bodies: New Approaches (Les corps (non)liés)

 
 
Leeds IMC | 6th-9th July 2020
 
For decades, bodies have been a central framework for historical inquiries. No matter how much we try to distance ourselves from them, bodies remain at the centre and borders of scholarship. Medieval bodies were fluid and contradictory loci: bound and unbound, contained yet susceptible to a host of external physical and invisible forces. Bodily boundaries were paradoxically sharp, debated, and real, yet also fluid, permeable and imaginary.
 
This new strand at IMC 2020 seeks to investigate these ‘real’ and ‘imaginary’ borders of the body and to complicate and critique existing narratives of ‘bound bodies’. As such, this strand is intentionally broad in its scope and embraces innovative and interdisciplinary approaches that push back, and go beyond, established methodologies. 
 
What? Twenty-minute papers; interest in a roundtable discussion also welcome
 
Who? Scholars from all career stages, eras and geographies. ECR and Queer approaches are particularly welcome. 
 
Suggested topics include (but are not limited to): 
 
· Un-binding scholarship: innovative approaches to bodies
 
· Bodily layers: ligaments, nerves, blood, bone, flesh, clothing
 
· Bodies and the cosmos: healing, magical influences, microcosm/macrocosm
 
· Bodies in flux: sensory experience, synaesthesia, bodily passions and emotions, cross dressing
 
· Bodily interactions: homosociality, sexuality, movement, legal systems
 
Please send titles and abstracts (maximum 250 words) together with a short biography and institutional affiliation (where relevant) to Jack Ford (jack.ford.13@ucl.ac.uk) or Lauren Rozenberg (lauren.rozenberg.14@ucl.ac.ukby 15th September.
 
Please also see the attached file for the CfP poster. Anyone applying will have to bear in mind that they will need to be registered to attend the IMC and unfortunately, as a new strand, we cannot cover any registration fees or transportation costs. Further information about the IMC can be found here: https://www.imc.leeds.ac.uk/

CFP – Leeds IMC 2020 – ‘Minority and Marginalised Experiences’, organised by An Australasian Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies

 

Recent scholarship has begun to acknowledge that the focus of Medieval and Early Modern Studies has long been on the elite, male, western European experience. New movements in academia are addressing this imbalance, acknowledging that women, ethnic minorities, and other marginalised groups contributed richly to the fabric of medieval and early modern life. Ceræ aims to join this shift in focus to the experiences of minority groups, marginalised peoples, and life in non-western territories with a conference session at IMC Leeds 2020.

Topics may include but are not limited to:

  • Experiences of minority or marginalised groups
  • Writings by minority or marginalised groups
  • Literary depictions of minority or marginalised groups
  • The effacement of minority or marginalised groups
  • Marginalia
  • Experiences on the transition of a border or landscape
  • The law of minority and marginalised groups
  • Minority and marginalised cultures, beliefs, and celebrations
  • Experiences of disability and physical and mental illness

Ceræ invites submissions encompassing all aspects of the late classical, medieval, and early modern world. There are no geographical restrictions. As an interdisciplinary journal, Ceræ encourages submissions across the fields of archaeology, art history, historical ecology, literature, linguistics,  intellectual history, musicology, politics, social studies, and beyond.

Abstracts of 250 words should be sent to editorcerae@gmail.com by 1st September 2019.

Attendees are responsible for all fees and costs associated with attending the IMC, and for registering for the congress.

For further enquiries contact our Editor: editorcerae@gmail.com; or get in touch via Facebook (facebook.com/CeraeJournal) or Twitter (@CeraeJournal).