CFP – « Disability and the Medieval Cults of Saints: Interdisciplinary and Intersectional Approaches » – edited volume by Stephanie Grace-Petinos, Leah Pope Parker, and Alicia Spencer-Hall

CFP: Disability and the Medieval Cults of Saints: Interdisciplinary and Intersectional Approaches
Discussion published by Massimo Rondolino on Friday, July 27, 2018
Editors: Stephanie Grace-Petinos, Leah Pope Parker, and Alicia Spencer-Hall
We invite abstract submissions for 7,500-word essays to be included in an edited volume on the topic of Disability and the Medieval Cults of Saints. Because saints’ cults in the Middle Ages centralized the body—those of the saints themselves, those of devotees, and the idea of the body on earth and in the afterlife—scholars of medieval disability frequently find that our best sources are those that also deal with saints and sanctity. This volume therefore seeks to foster and assemble a wide range of approaches to disability in the context of medieval saints’ cults. We seek contributions spanning a variety of fields, including history, literature, art history, archaeology, material culture, histories of science and medicine, religious history, etc. We especially encourage contributions that extend beyond Roman Christianity (including non-Christian concepts of sanctity) and that extend beyond Europe/the West.
For the purposes of this volume, we define “disability” as broadly including physical impairment, diversity of bodily forms, chronic illness, neurodiversity (mental illness, cognitive impairment, etc), sensory impairment, and any other variation in bodily form or ability that affected medieval individuals’ role and treatment in their communities. We are open to topics spanning the medieval period both temporally and geographically, but also inclusive of late antiquity and the early modern era. The editors envision essays falling into three units: saints with disabilities; saints interacting with disability; and theorizing sanctity/disability.
We welcome proposals on topics including, but not limited to:
· Phenomenology of saints’ cults with respect to disability, e.g. pilgrimage, feast days, liturgy, etc;
· Materiality of sanctity involved in reliquaries, shrines, and relics;
· Doctrinal approaches to disability in relation to sanctity and holiness;
· Sanctity and bodies in the archaeological record;
· Intersections of disability and race/gender/sexuality/etc in hagiography, art, and material culture;
· Healing miracles and disabling miraculous punishments;
· Cross-cultural approaches to sanctity and disability;
· Saints who wrote about disability;
· Specific saints with connections to concepts of disability, e.g. Margaret of Antioch, Cosmas and Damian, Francis of Assisi, Dymphna, etc;
· Theorizing sanctity in relation to disability; and
· Saintly figures in non-hagiographic genres.
Timeline
Oct. 1, 2018 Proposals due
Oct. 31, 2018 Replies sent to proposals
Nov. 30, 2018 Volume proposal submitted to press (contributors will provide short abstracts and bios)
May 31, 2019 Essays due from contributors
Aug. 30, 2019 Editors deliver extensive feedback to contributors
Jan. 15, 2020 Revised essays due from contributors
April 3, 2020 Full volume manuscript delivered to press
Please submit abstracts of 300–400 words, along with a short author bio and a description of any images you anticipate wanting to include in your essay, to the editors at DisabilitySanctity@gmail.com by Monday, October 1, 2018.

CFP – Skin in Medieval and Early Modern Worlds – Perth Medieval and Renaissance Group/UWA Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies Annual Conference

Skin in Medieval and Early Modern Worlds

Perth Medieval and Renaissance Group/UWA Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies Annual Conference

13 October 2018

From the organisators website :

Keynote Speaker: Dr Lisa Beaven (La Trobe University), ‘Living Flesh: Splendor, Sex and Sickness on the Surface of the Skin’.

Skin as a material served a vital role in premodern economies. It was an essential ingredient in clothing and tools, and it formed the primary material for the manuscripts on which knowledge and ideas were recorded and preserved. Beyond the many uses for the skins of animals, the idea of skin interested artists, scholars, and theologians. As a boundary or surface, skin presented a range of symbolic possibilities. Images of skin, such as its piercing, often acted as metaphors for the uncovering of secrets or the interpretation of allegory. Premodern observers, likewise, often believed that the appearance and colour of an individual’s skin indicated truths about their inner nature. Diseases of the skin, such as leprosy, attracted legislation and intellectual speculation, drawing together the immaterial world of ideas regarding skin and the treatment of actual human skins.

We are interested in papers that address the many premodern uses of skin, as well representations of and ideas about skin. This conference is multidisciplinary and wide-ranging; we welcome papers from the fields of book culture and manuscript studies, history, material culture, medicine, disability studies, race studies, crime and punishment, art, literature, and theology.

The conference organisers invite proposals for 20-minute papers.

Please send a paper title, 250-word abstract, and a short (no more than 100-word) biography to pmrg.cmems.conference@gmail.com by 31 May 2018.

 

 

More infos on the organisators website.

CFP – Chaucer: Sound and Vision – October 19th and 20th, 2018 – University of South Alabama

CFP – Chaucer: Sound and Vision,

October 19th and 20th, 2018

Deadline for Submissions: May 1, 2018

Name of Organization: University of South Alabama

Contact Email: ChaucerSoundAndVision@gmail.com

The English Department at the University of South Alabama invites paper proposals for a conference on Chaucer and the senses (vision, hearing, touch, smell, taste), to be held in Mobile, Alabama, October 19th and 20th, 2018. Papers on any aspect of the topic are welcome, along with papers on writers contemporary with Chaucer (Langland, Gower, the Pearl-poet, Julian of Norwich, etc.).

The plenary speaker will be Michael P. Kuczynski of Tulane University. The conference will also include a roundtable discussion on the state of Sound Studies. Outstanding papers will also be invited to submit expanded versions for an edited volume on the topic.

Please send proposals of 350 words to John Halbrooks and Becky McLaughlin at ChaucerSoundAndVision@gmail.com by May 1, 2018.

CFP – Brussels Medieval Culture and War Conference: Power, Authority, and Normativity – Université Saint-Louis of Bruxelles, 24–26 May 2018

Brussels Medieval Culture and War Conference: Power, Authority, and Normativity

Université Saint-Louis – Bruxelles
24–26 May 2018

An omnipresent phenomenon, war was a dominant social fact that impacted every aspect of society in the Middle Ages. Moving away from so-called ‘histoire-bataille’ that studied war on its own as an isolated succession of battles, studies have moved towards investigation of the reciprocal relationships between military conflicts and the economic, legal, political, religious, and social spheres in the Middle Ages.

Capture d_écran 2017-12-16 à 18.05.18

After previous meetings held at the University of Leeds in 2016 and the University of Lisbon in 2017, the 2018 edition of the ‘Medieval Culture and War Conference’ will take place at the Saint-Louis University, Brussels, and will focus on the theme of ‘Power, Authority, and Normativity’. We particularly welcome papers that discuss how medieval warfare, through the organisation, the techniques, and the discourses it mobilised, contributed to the shaping of power and power relationships, and how these power relations, in turn, could influence the adoption of certain forms of military organisation and techniques of warfare; how it related to the concept of authority; and how it was regulated by changing sets of rules over the period. How did power relationships, ideas about authority, and evolving norms have an impact on medieval warfare in theory and in practice? Interdisciplinary approaches from various theoretical backgrounds (e.g. archaeologi- cal, art historical, historical, literary, or sociological perspectives) are encouraged.

Subjects may include, but are not limited to:

  • Theory, doctrine, and ideology of war
  • War, propaganda, and rulership
  • Law and legislation on warfare
  • Literature on war and chivalry
  • Chivalric ethos and military discipline
  • Military justice and violence
  • Military organisation and logistics
  • Warfare and religion
  • Gender and war
  • Fortifications, weaponry, and technology
  • Real and imagined relations between combatants and non-combatants
  • Ideas of ‘Others’ and ‘Otherness’ in warfare
  • Funding of warfare

The conference, organised by the Research Centre for the include keynote presentations by Justine Firnhaber-Baker (University of St Andrews) and Bertrand Schnerb (Université Lille 3). The working language for the conference is English. Please submit an abstract of 250–300 words for a twenty-minute paper, or a proposal for a thematic session of three twenty-minute papers, with a short biography of 150 words, to brusselscultureandwar@gmail.com by 31 January 2018. Contributions from postgraduates and early career researchers are encouraged. A publication of selected proceedings is planned.

 

Brussels Organisation Commi ee: Eric Bousmar (Université Saint-Louis – Bruxelles), Michael Depreter (Université libre de Bruxelles/Université Saint-Louis – Bruxelles), Philippe Desmette (Université Saint-Louis – Bruxelles), Gilles Lecuppre (Université catholique de Louvain), and Quentin Verreycken (Université catholique de Louvain/Université Saint-Louis – Bruxelles).

In conjunction with the Leeds Executive Organisation Committee and the Lisbon Organisation Committee.

For more information visit their website: cultureandwarconference.wordpress.com/.

CFP – ‘The Others’ – Deviants, Outcasts and Outsiders in Archaeology – publication in Archaeological Review from Cambridge Department of Archaeology.

Archaeological Review from Cambridge Department of Archaeology.

‘The Others’ — Deviants, Outcasts and Outsiders in Archaeology

Volume 33.2 November 2018

Theme editors: Leah Damman and Samantha Leggett

Throughout human history, groups have met and interacted; this has a tendency to give rise to othering behaviours, ethnic discourses and a myriad of identity related issues. But what is the archaeological signature of ‘the Others’? Archaeological literature is full of examples of ‘deviant’ practices, and modern constructs? This volume seeks submissions that discuss these ideas and explore concept of identity, otherness, deviancy, ethnicity and exclusion in archaeology.

How we define nations and nth-oral groups, and what is designated as outside of or ‘Other’ is important to consider now more than ever; especially considering recent global political events. The increasing study of identity and archaeology in recent decades is predominantly concerned with labels and traditional discourses. How we define. protect and preserve the cultural heritage of non-Western and marginalized cultural groups should also be considered. The aim of this volume is to give a voice to the ‘Others’ of the past but also to be critical of our own theory and practice when it comes to socio.cultural definitions and studying identity in the past.

Volume 33.2 of the Archaeological Review from Cambridge provides a forum to facilitate discussion surrounding the unusual treatment of selected persons in the past, understanding that this could provide and concepts of eschatological fate. This volume seeks submissions that discuss these ideas and explore concepts of identity, otherness, deviancy, ethnicity and exclusion in archaeology. Papers integrating archaeology with other subjects such as history anthropology, ethnography or sociology are thus also encouraged. Contributions might explore, although are not limited to, the following topics:

▪  Theories and identification of Otherness, deviancy and alterity

▪ Deviant burial customs and mortuary practices Performing ethnicity and forming identities

▪ Minority group archaeology

▪ Outsiders and the other in cultural heritage

▪ Colonial and post-colonial perspectives

Papers of no more than 4000 words should be submitted to Leah Damman (ld431@cam.ac.uk), and Samantha Leggett (sal78@cam.ac.uk), any time before 1 March 2018, for publication in November 2018. Potential contributors are encouraged to register interest early by either submitting an abstract of up to 250 words or contacting the editors to further discuss their ideas.

More information about the Archaeological Review from Cambridge, including back issues and submission guidelines on the review website.