Archives de catégorie : Call for contributions

CFP – Skin in Medieval and Early Modern Worlds – Perth Medieval and Renaissance Group/UWA Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies Annual Conference

Skin in Medieval and Early Modern Worlds

Perth Medieval and Renaissance Group/UWA Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies Annual Conference

13 October 2018

From the organisators website :

Keynote Speaker: Dr Lisa Beaven (La Trobe University), ‘Living Flesh: Splendor, Sex and Sickness on the Surface of the Skin’.

Skin as a material served a vital role in premodern economies. It was an essential ingredient in clothing and tools, and it formed the primary material for the manuscripts on which knowledge and ideas were recorded and preserved. Beyond the many uses for the skins of animals, the idea of skin interested artists, scholars, and theologians. As a boundary or surface, skin presented a range of symbolic possibilities. Images of skin, such as its piercing, often acted as metaphors for the uncovering of secrets or the interpretation of allegory. Premodern observers, likewise, often believed that the appearance and colour of an individual’s skin indicated truths about their inner nature. Diseases of the skin, such as leprosy, attracted legislation and intellectual speculation, drawing together the immaterial world of ideas regarding skin and the treatment of actual human skins.

We are interested in papers that address the many premodern uses of skin, as well representations of and ideas about skin. This conference is multidisciplinary and wide-ranging; we welcome papers from the fields of book culture and manuscript studies, history, material culture, medicine, disability studies, race studies, crime and punishment, art, literature, and theology.

The conference organisers invite proposals for 20-minute papers.

Please send a paper title, 250-word abstract, and a short (no more than 100-word) biography to pmrg.cmems.conference@gmail.com by 31 May 2018.

 

 

More infos on the organisators website.

CFP – Chaucer: Sound and Vision – October 19th and 20th, 2018 – University of South Alabama

CFP – Chaucer: Sound and Vision,

October 19th and 20th, 2018

Deadline for Submissions: May 1, 2018

Name of Organization: University of South Alabama

Contact Email: ChaucerSoundAndVision@gmail.com

The English Department at the University of South Alabama invites paper proposals for a conference on Chaucer and the senses (vision, hearing, touch, smell, taste), to be held in Mobile, Alabama, October 19th and 20th, 2018. Papers on any aspect of the topic are welcome, along with papers on writers contemporary with Chaucer (Langland, Gower, the Pearl-poet, Julian of Norwich, etc.).

The plenary speaker will be Michael P. Kuczynski of Tulane University. The conference will also include a roundtable discussion on the state of Sound Studies. Outstanding papers will also be invited to submit expanded versions for an edited volume on the topic.

Please send proposals of 350 words to John Halbrooks and Becky McLaughlin at ChaucerSoundAndVision@gmail.com by May 1, 2018.

CFP – Brussels Medieval Culture and War Conference: Power, Authority, and Normativity – Université Saint-Louis of Bruxelles, 24–26 May 2018

Brussels Medieval Culture and War Conference: Power, Authority, and Normativity

Université Saint-Louis – Bruxelles
24–26 May 2018

An omnipresent phenomenon, war was a dominant social fact that impacted every aspect of society in the Middle Ages. Moving away from so-called ‘histoire-bataille’ that studied war on its own as an isolated succession of battles, studies have moved towards investigation of the reciprocal relationships between military conflicts and the economic, legal, political, religious, and social spheres in the Middle Ages.

Capture d_écran 2017-12-16 à 18.05.18

After previous meetings held at the University of Leeds in 2016 and the University of Lisbon in 2017, the 2018 edition of the ‘Medieval Culture and War Conference’ will take place at the Saint-Louis University, Brussels, and will focus on the theme of ‘Power, Authority, and Normativity’. We particularly welcome papers that discuss how medieval warfare, through the organisation, the techniques, and the discourses it mobilised, contributed to the shaping of power and power relationships, and how these power relations, in turn, could influence the adoption of certain forms of military organisation and techniques of warfare; how it related to the concept of authority; and how it was regulated by changing sets of rules over the period. How did power relationships, ideas about authority, and evolving norms have an impact on medieval warfare in theory and in practice? Interdisciplinary approaches from various theoretical backgrounds (e.g. archaeologi- cal, art historical, historical, literary, or sociological perspectives) are encouraged.

Subjects may include, but are not limited to:

  • Theory, doctrine, and ideology of war
  • War, propaganda, and rulership
  • Law and legislation on warfare
  • Literature on war and chivalry
  • Chivalric ethos and military discipline
  • Military justice and violence
  • Military organisation and logistics
  • Warfare and religion
  • Gender and war
  • Fortifications, weaponry, and technology
  • Real and imagined relations between combatants and non-combatants
  • Ideas of ‘Others’ and ‘Otherness’ in warfare
  • Funding of warfare

The conference, organised by the Research Centre for the include keynote presentations by Justine Firnhaber-Baker (University of St Andrews) and Bertrand Schnerb (Université Lille 3). The working language for the conference is English. Please submit an abstract of 250–300 words for a twenty-minute paper, or a proposal for a thematic session of three twenty-minute papers, with a short biography of 150 words, to brusselscultureandwar@gmail.com by 31 January 2018. Contributions from postgraduates and early career researchers are encouraged. A publication of selected proceedings is planned.

 

Brussels Organisation Commi ee: Eric Bousmar (Université Saint-Louis – Bruxelles), Michael Depreter (Université libre de Bruxelles/Université Saint-Louis – Bruxelles), Philippe Desmette (Université Saint-Louis – Bruxelles), Gilles Lecuppre (Université catholique de Louvain), and Quentin Verreycken (Université catholique de Louvain/Université Saint-Louis – Bruxelles).

In conjunction with the Leeds Executive Organisation Committee and the Lisbon Organisation Committee.

For more information visit their website: cultureandwarconference.wordpress.com/.

CFP – ‘The Others’ – Deviants, Outcasts and Outsiders in Archaeology – publication in Archaeological Review from Cambridge Department of Archaeology.

Archaeological Review from Cambridge Department of Archaeology.

‘The Others’ — Deviants, Outcasts and Outsiders in Archaeology

Volume 33.2 November 2018

Theme editors: Leah Damman and Samantha Leggett

Throughout human history, groups have met and interacted; this has a tendency to give rise to othering behaviours, ethnic discourses and a myriad of identity related issues. But what is the archaeological signature of ‘the Others’? Archaeological literature is full of examples of ‘deviant’ practices, and modern constructs? This volume seeks submissions that discuss these ideas and explore concept of identity, otherness, deviancy, ethnicity and exclusion in archaeology.

How we define nations and nth-oral groups, and what is designated as outside of or ‘Other’ is important to consider now more than ever; especially considering recent global political events. The increasing study of identity and archaeology in recent decades is predominantly concerned with labels and traditional discourses. How we define. protect and preserve the cultural heritage of non-Western and marginalized cultural groups should also be considered. The aim of this volume is to give a voice to the ‘Others’ of the past but also to be critical of our own theory and practice when it comes to socio.cultural definitions and studying identity in the past.

Volume 33.2 of the Archaeological Review from Cambridge provides a forum to facilitate discussion surrounding the unusual treatment of selected persons in the past, understanding that this could provide and concepts of eschatological fate. This volume seeks submissions that discuss these ideas and explore concepts of identity, otherness, deviancy, ethnicity and exclusion in archaeology. Papers integrating archaeology with other subjects such as history anthropology, ethnography or sociology are thus also encouraged. Contributions might explore, although are not limited to, the following topics:

▪  Theories and identification of Otherness, deviancy and alterity

▪ Deviant burial customs and mortuary practices Performing ethnicity and forming identities

▪ Minority group archaeology

▪ Outsiders and the other in cultural heritage

▪ Colonial and post-colonial perspectives

Papers of no more than 4000 words should be submitted to Leah Damman (ld431@cam.ac.uk), and Samantha Leggett (sal78@cam.ac.uk), any time before 1 March 2018, for publication in November 2018. Potential contributors are encouraged to register interest early by either submitting an abstract of up to 250 words or contacting the editors to further discuss their ideas.

More information about the Archaeological Review from Cambridge, including back issues and submission guidelines on the review website.

Call for contribution – Same Bodies, Different Women: Witches, Whores, and Handicapped – Trivent Publishing

Call for contribution – Same Bodies, Different Women: Witches, Whores, and Handicapped – Trivent Publishing

Serie : HISTORY AND ARCHEOLOGY

‘Other’ Women in the Middle Ages and the Early Modern Period
Who are the ‘other’ women of the Middle Ages and the Early Modern Period?
This volume seeks to offer a overview on female otherness concentrating on the variety of contexts in which ‘other’ women emerge:
How is their ‘otherness’ constructed?
Who are the forgotten women of the Middle Ages?
How are they perceived?
What makes them ‘other?

 

The literature on women in the Middle Ages or the Early Modern Period has the tendency to mostly emphasize models (be that
saints, queens, or women in positions of power)
and the brighter side of femininity.
This scholarship is occasionally supplemented by individual case studies of ‘other’ women, such as prostitutes, which are usually used to reinforce notions of ‘ideal’ feminine behaviour.
Nevertheless, a volume which encompasses all forms of deviance from the norm seems necessary to counterbalance and to supplement this vast literature on medieval women.
Applying a multi-disciplinary approach to these marginalized women should aid not only in uncovering a more complete picture of medieval women, but also to better understand their own agency and potential for action.

 

This volume welcomes individually – submitted papers, but will also gather the papers from the workshop entitled
“Forgotten Women from a Forgotten Region: Prostitutes and Female Slaves in Central and Eastern Europe in the Long Middle Ages” to be held at Central European University, Budapest, in May, 2017

 

They welcome papers for the volume to be titled Same Bodies, Different Women: Witches, Whores, and Handicapped. ‘Other’ Women in the Middle Ages and the Early Modern Period Aiming to reflect recent research on the construction(s) of female otherness, we call for original manuscripts focusing on (but not limited to) the following transdisciplinary topics related to women :
  • Art: visual and textual sources (the whore of Babylon/the Apocalypse, courtesans, etc)
  • Religion: impure, lapsed, possessed women, heretics
  • Medicine: disabled, mentally insane or ill women , hermaphrodites ; abortions/bodily dysfunctions/malformations
  • Society: witches, beggars, foreigners, enslaved women
  • Sexuality: prostitutes, sexually deviant women

 

Submission Guidelines
Papers should be written following the humanities template and guidelines found at www.trivent-publishing.eu and should have between minimum 7 and maximum 20 pages
We expect submissions by no later than September 2017.

 

The volume will be published open access. It will be listed in
CEEOL, Directory of Open Access Scholarly Resources, SSOAR, DOI, and will be sent for evaluation in the Book Citation Index of Thomson Reuters.

 

For information and queries on the scientific content of the volume, please contact the editors of the volume,
Andrea-Bianka Znorovszky,
American University of Central Asia,
znorovszky_a@auca.kg
Christopher Mielke, Central European University,
Mielke_Christopher@phd.ceu.edu
For information on the publication, please contact teodora.artimon@trivent-publishing.eu
or see Trivent Publishing’s website here:
www.trivent -publishing.eu

 

FInd the call for contribution on the editor’s website.

 

 

CFP – Lived religion and everyday life through earlymodern catholic hagiography – Finland Institute in Rome

Lived religion and everyday life through earlymodern catholic hagiography – Finland Institute in Rome

Final submission of articles: Autumn 2013

Studies on medieval social and cultural history have already for several decades demonstrated the rich possibilities hagiographic material can offer the historian interested in everyday life, lived religion and society. Since the late fifteenth century, this material has experienced an unprecedented growth in volume. Nevertheless. there is still a great need for studies on lived religion and everyday life portrayed through early modem catholic hagiographic material.

To address this need. we invite abstracts for contributions on the subject from scholars worthy with early modem (ca. 15km » centuries) hagiographic material. such as beatification and canonisation processes. other miracle accounts. art, vitae. and other spiritual (autobiographies. The aim is to produce a high-quality collection of articles, which offers cutting-edge and fruitful insights into early modern social and cultural history, using hagiographic texts and art as sources. We especially welcome communications, which have a sensitive approach to gender, age, health and social status.

The deadline for submitting abstracts is the end of February 2017. Twelve most promising abstracts will be selected. it funding cm be secured, the article drafts will be discussed it May 2018 in a workshop organised at the Finnish Institute in Rome (Vita Lante). The collection of articles will be submitted to an international publisher following the peer-review process soon after the meeting, in autumn 2018.

Suitable article topics for the collection will include. but are not limited to:

  • family and household, gender roles
  • health, body, dis/ability, illness, and cure
  • death and salvation
  • religious practices and materiality of religion
  • identity and community

    Please send an abstract of no more than 300 words for an English article and a short biography including name, affiliation and the most important publications, to earlymodernhagiography@gmail.com by Tuesday February 28th. 2017.

Editors and contact informations:
Jenni Kuuliala
PhD. Postdoctoral Researcher (Academy of Finland)
University of Tampere

News ! – Call for proposal – Serie « Mental Health in Historical Perspective » ed. by Palgrave MacMillan

Mental Health in Historical Perspective

Editors : Coleborne, C. (Ed), Smith, M. (Ed)

Covering all historical periods and geographical contexts, the series explores how mental illness has been understood, experienced, diagnosed, treated and contested. It will publish works that engage actively with contemporary debates related to mental health and, as such, will be of interest not only to historians, but also mental health professionals, patients and policy makers. With its focus on mental health, rather than just psychiatry, the series will endeavour to provide more patient-centred histories. Although this has long been an aim of health historians, it has not been realised, and this series aims to change that. The scope of the series is kept as broad as possible to attract good quality proposals about all aspects of the history of mental health from all periods.
The series emphasises interdisciplinary approaches to the field of study, and encourages short titles, longer works, collections, and titles which stretch the boundaries of academic publishing in new ways.

History of Disease, Disability & Medicine in Medieval Europe