Kalamazoo 2019 – Sponsored Session on disability

Contagions: Society for Historic Infectious Disease Studies(2): Interdisciplinary Approaches to Historic Disease I–II

Contact: Michelle Ziegler – 2720 Stratford Lane; Granite City, IL 62040

Phone: 618-420-3304

Email: miziegl@siue.edu

__________________________________________________________

Taiwan Association of Classical, Medieval, and Renaissance Studies (TACMRS)(1): Disease, Disaster, Disruption, and the Apocalyptic Imagination

Contact: Carolyn Scott – National Cheng Kung Univ. Dept. of Foreign Languages and Literature 1 University Rd.Tainan 701 Taiwan

Phone: +11886983710126

Email: cscott@mail.ncku.edu.tw

__________________________________________________________

Háskóli Íslands; Icelandic Research Fund (2): Disability before Disability in the Medieval Icelandic Sagas I–II

Contact: Ármann Jakobsson – Univ. of Iceland Árnagarður Reykjavik 101 Iceland

Phone: +3545254719

Email: armannja@hi.is

__________________________________________________________

Society for the Study of Disability in the Middle Ages(3): Medieval Disability and Pedagogy (A Roundtable); Intersections of Race and Disability in the Global Middle Ages; Medieval Disability and Public Scholarship

Contact: Tory Pearman

Email: pearmatv@miamioh.edu

__________________________________________________________

Univ. of South Carolina–Aiken(1): Disability and the Religious Body

Contact: Kyle Joseph Williams

Phone: 770-378-5610

Email: kylew@usca.edu

Must see sessions on Disability History – International Medieval Congress – Leeds – 2018 2-5 July 2018

Must see ! sessions on Disability History –

International Medieval Congress –

Leeds – 2018 2-5 July 2018

Session 150
Title Scientific, Empirical, Biblical, and Hagiographical Knowledge in the Middle Ages, I: Astronomy, Computus, and Medicine
Date/Time Monday 2 July 2018: 11.15-12.45
Sponsor School of Arts, English & Languages, Queen’s University Belfast
Organiser Sarah Baccianti, School of Arts, English & Languages, Queen’s University Belfast
Moderator/Chair Ciaran Arthur, School of Arts, English & Languages, Queen’s University Belfast
Paper 150-a Anglo-Saxons’ Visions of Modern Science
(Language: English)
Marilina Cesario, School of Arts, English & Languages, Queen’s University Belfast
Pedro Lacerda, School of Mathematics & Physics, Queen’s University Belfast
Index Terms: Historiography – Medieval; Language and Literature – Old English; Science
Paper 150-b Why Write Computus in English?: Vernacularity and Computistical Inquiry
(Language: English)
Rebecca Stephenson, School of English, Drama & Film, University College Dublin
Index Terms: Language and Literature – Old English; Literacy and Orality; Science
Paper 150-c Pus, Boils, and Amputations: Surgery in Medieval Scandinavia
(Language: English)
Sarah Baccianti, School of Arts, English & Languages, Queen’s University Belfast
Index Terms: Language and Literature – Scandinavian; Medicine
Abstract This session will focus on attitudes to knowledge, which constitutes one of the most complex concepts in the Middle Ages, as suggested by the vast semantic range of the Latin terms commonly translated as ‘knowledge’, including scientia, cognitio, notitia, eruditio and sapientia.
It will consider how scientia was transmitted and manipulated in the Middle Ages by looking at diverse sources ranging from astronomical, computistical, and mechanical texts (medicine, agriculture, and navigation), maps and the environment, and liturgical and hagiographical compositions from England, Scandinavia, and the Continent. Furthermore it will discuss the ways in which scientific knowledge and biblical and hagiographical learning were used to exercise power and the role that beliefs played in shaping and promoting scientific thinking.
Session 339
Title Memory in the Angevin World
Date/Time Monday 2 July 2018: 16.30-18.00
Sponsor Angevin World Network
Organiser Michael Staunton, School of History, University College Dublin
Moderator/Chair Stephen Church, Department of History, King’s College London
Paper 339-a Remembering the Conquest of Ireland in the Angevin World
(Language: English)
Colin Veach, School of Histories, Languages & Cultures, University of Hull
Index Terms: Historiography – Medieval; Mentalities; Military History
Paper 339-b Remembering Illness in the Angevin World: Variations of Familial Memory in the Miracle Accounts of Gilbert of Sempringham
(Language: English)
Krystal Carmichael, School of History, University College Dublin
Index Terms: Hagiography; Historiography – Medieval; Medicine; Mentalities
Paper 339-c Remembering the Loss of Normandy
(Language: English)
Michael Staunton, School of History, University College Dublin
Index Terms: Historiography – Medieval; Mentalities; Military History
Abstract This session addresses the ways in which events were remembered in the lands ruled by the Angevin kings of England (c. 1154 – c. 1216), a time of much innovation and variety in the recording and remembering of the past. Paper (a) looks at how the invasion of Ireland was remembered outside Ireland, in Latin and vernacular texts. Paper (b) discusses disputed memories of miracles in hagiographical texts, particularly those associated with Gilbert of Sempringham. Paper (c) examines the divergent ways in which King John’s loss of Normandy was remembered across the ‘Angevin empire’.

 

Session 399
Title #disIMC: Current Challenges to Accessibility and Ways Forward – A Round Table Discussion
Date/Time Monday 2 July 2018: 16.30-18.00
Sponsor Medievalists with Disabilities Network
Organiser Alexandra R. A. Lee, Department of Italian, University College London
Moderator/Chair Alexandra R. A. Lee, Department of Italian, University College London
Abstract At the IMC 2017, Medievalists with Disabilities hosted its first event. #disIMC was a ‘bring your own lunch’ affair, slotted into the timetable at the last minute. It was a great success and marked the beginning of the Medievalists with Disabilities (#dismed) network.

This round table discussion will discuss accessibility in higher education and ways that we can address issues. We take the term disabilities in the broadest possible sense, incorporating invisible and visible conditions, chronic illness, and mental health, to name but a few. Panellists will address issues individuals have overcome in Higher Education, discuss what it is like to be in HE with a disability/chronic condition, and pinpoint issues that need further attention.

Participants include Joanne Edge (University of Cambridge), Edward Mills (University of Exeter), Emma Osborne (University of Glasgow), Alicia Spencer-Hall (University College London), and Therron Welstead (University of Wales Trinity Saint David).

 

Session 604
Title New Voices in Anglo-Saxon Studies, I
Date/Time Tuesday 3 July 2018: 11.15-12.45
Sponsor International Society of Anglo-Saxonists
Organiser Megan Cavell, Department of English Literature, University of Birmingham
Moderator/Chair Damian Fleming, Department of English & Linguistics, Indiana University-Purdue University, Fort Wayne
Paper 604-a ‘Se bið mihtigre se ðe gæð þonne se þe crypð’: Metaphoric Disability in the Old English Boethius
(Language: English)
Leah Pope Parker, English Department, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Index Terms: Language and Literature – Old English; Philosophy; Social History
Paper 604-b Women, Adornment, and Social Change: Necklaces in 7th-Century Anglo-Saxon England
(Language: English)
Katie Haworth, Department of Archaeology, Durham University
Index Terms: Archaeology – Artefacts; Women’s Studies
Paper 604-c Quid est vox?: Mystery and Mysticism
(Language: English)
Matthew Coker, St Hilda’s College, University of Oxford
Index Terms: Language and Literature – Celtic; Language and Literature – Latin; Language and Literature – Old English; Learning (The Classical Inheritance)
Abstract The New Voices sessions are intended for all scholars new to the field of Anglo-Saxon studies, including research students, newly-appointed lecturers, and anyone who has only recently begun to work in this area. They provide an interdisciplinary perspective and showcase new work in the field. All submissions are reviewed by the International Society of Anglo-Saxonists (ISAS), who determine the ultimate selection of papers through a process of blind peer review. This particular session focuses on bodies.

 

Session 1047
Title Reputation, Emotion, and Remembering Death and Illness
Date/Time Wednesday 4 July 2018: 09.00-10.30
Sponsor Prato Consortium for Medieval & Renaissance Studies, Monash University, Victoria
Organiser Peter Francis Howard, Centre for Medieval & Renaissance Studies, Monash University, Victoria
Moderator/Chair John Henderson, Department of History, Classics & Archaeology, Birkbeck, University of London / School of Philosophical , Historical & International Studies , Monash University
Paper 1047-a Recording a Place of Emotions and Violence: Mapping the Coronial Deaths of Medieval Oxfordshire
(Language: English)
Annie Blachly, Centre for Medieval & Renaissance Studies, Monash University, Victoria
Index Terms: Archives and Sources; Computing in Medieval Studies; Social History
Paper 1047-b The Insania and Piety of Herimann of Nevers: Remembering a Mentally Ill Carolingian Bishop
(Language: English)
Rachel Stone, Department of History, King’s College London / Learning Resources & Service Excellence, University of Bedfordshire
Index Terms: Ecclesiastical History; Medicine; Mentalities
Paper 1047-c Medical Memory of Sense and Emotion by Baverio de’Bonetti (d. 1480): A Physician of Bologna
(Language: English)
Gordon Whyte, School of Philosophical, Historical & International Studies, Monash University, Victoria
Index Terms: Medicine; Social History
Abstract Serious illness and sudden or violent death were familiar aspects of medieval life, but how did people choose to remember such experiences? Linked to the Body in the City Project, this session draws on a variety of different sources from across the Middle Ages recording illness and death, including medical treatises, coroners’ rolls, and forms of religious commemoration. The papers explore how the messy experiences of illness and death, and the complex emotions of those involved, could be interpreted and turned into more formal accounts of events, suitable for permanent record.

 

Session 1108
Title Sanctifying the Crip, Cripping the Sacred: Disability, Holiness, and Embodied Knowledge
Date/Time Wednesday 4 July 2018: 11.15-12.45
Sponsor Hagiography Society
Organiser Alicia Spencer-Hall, School of Languages, Linguistics & Film, Queen Mary, University of London
Moderator/Chair Alicia Spencer-Hall, School of Languages, Linguistics & Film, Queen Mary, University of London
Paper 1108-a Hildegard of Bingen’s Hagiography: The Community of Heaven and Earth and the Social Model of Disability
(Language: English)
Stephen Marc D’Evelyn, School for Policy Studies, University of Bristol
Index Terms: Gender Studies; Hagiography; Religious Life; Theology
Paper 1108-b Translations of (Dis)Ability, Disease, and Digestion in The Book of Margery Kempe
(Language: English)
Katherine Gubbels, English Department, Metropolitan Community College, Nebraska
Index Terms: Gender Studies; Hagiography; Medicine; Theology
Paper 1108-c Disability and Power in the Early Lives of St Francis of Assisi
(Language: English)
Donna Trembinski, Department of History, St Francis Xavier University, Nova Scotia
Index Terms: Gender Studies; Hagiography; Religious Life; Theology
Paper 1108-d Bodily Arithmetic: Physical and Sacred Identity in Tristan de Nanteuil
(Language: English)
Blake Gutt, Department of French, University of Cambridge
Index Terms: Gender Studies; Hagiography; Religious Life; Theology
Abstract A vast amount of our knowledge of the experience of impairment in the Middle Ages comes from religious works. An important manifestation of a presumptive saint’s holiness was their capacity to perform mystically curative healings to return their devotees to an able-bodied state. But medieval saints did not just tend to those with impairment. Some saints were themselves explicitly physically impaired, either permanently or temporarily. Saints’ ascetic self-mortification could also lead to impairment. In all instances, the saint’s body is divergent to the able-bodied norm of those around them, the non-saintly. It operates as a vector of the divine in miraculous healing of others; a receptacle of the divine in their ability to withstand extreme ascetic degradation. What is at stake if we consider the medieval saint’s body as impaired, disabled, emphatically non-able-bodied?

Ultimately, this panel seeks to interrogate the ways in which the body – be that the saintly body, the disabled body, and/or the saintly and disabled body – acts as a site of embodied knowledge. More specifically, it aims to consider the body as a site of somatic memorialization: the corporeal matter of memory formation, memory retention, and temporal disturbance. How do impairments – writ on holy and profane bodies alike – bear witness to events, subject positions, even evanescent truths? And what does this form of productive bodily witnessing bring to bear on the concept of disability itself? This panel is comprised of four 15-minute papers.

More infos on the IMC Leeds website !

CFP – Technologies of Health, 1400-1700 – Renaissance Society of America Annual Meeting, Toronto, 17-19 March, 2019

Technologies of Health, 1400-1700
Call for Papers
RSA Annual Meeting, Toronto, 17-19 March, 2019
Deadline: July 1, 2018

The goal of this session is to explore technological developments in health and medicine between 1400- 1700. We seek contributions that focus on the promotion of new tools and therapies for health benefits among individuals and populations, or on the salubriousness of buildings and cities through innovative materials or structural and urban infrastructures. Approaches that center on technologies for healthy living and disease prevention, and not simply reactionary treatments or responses to crises, are also welcome. Additionally, proposals may consider the provisional character of technological developments as processes in order to examine failures in the history of health and medicine. We encourage interdisciplinary papers that engage contemporary treatises, intersections of religious and therapeutic practices, and the visual and material culture of health, as well as submissions that incorporate the global circulation of knowledge during the period.

Please submit paper proposals to Danielle Abdon (danielle.abdon@temple.edu) and Elizabeth Duntemann (elizabeth.duntemann@temple.edu) by July 1, 2018. Each proposal must include a paper title (max. 15 words), 150-word abstract, short CV (max. 300 words), and keywords.

More info on the organisators website.

Permeable bodies 05 – 06 October 2018 – University college london

Permeable bodies – 05/06 October 2018 – University college london

In recent years, the human body has gained a prominent position in discussions of medieval and early modern cultures. The troublesome contingency of the human body encompassed critical boundaries between inside and outside, and became a central concern in religious, political, and economical developments. Medieval bodies were permeable microcosms, not only sites containment but also of revelatory experiences. In the early modern period, body and identity were indistinct, interdependent categories, inseparable from the natural and cultural space that they inhabited. This logic of perpetual fluidity both generated a disquieting sense of impending doom, but also allowed for the propagation of multiple possibilities of understanding, which materialised into a rich visual and material culture.

We are delighted to invite all those interested in medieval and early modern studies to a 2-day conference on Friday 5 and Saturday 6 October 2018 at University College London. This event will explore medieval and early modern notions of the changing body, as well as changing notions of the body. Images and ideas of permeable bodies will serve as an inclusive platform of inquiry into bodies of different race, gender, sex, and ability.

We welcome 20 minutes talks from scholars of any career stage. We are particularly interested in incisive and provoking perspectives on bodies traditionally relegated to the margins, in conjunction with gender and disability studies. We seek critical and original responses on the theme of corporeal permeability across not only disciplines, but also chronological and geographical boundaries.

The conference includes a workshop at the Wellcome Library, where selected images from the archives will be displayed in a private study room.

Keynote speaker: Dr. Jack Hartnell (University of East Anglia)

Please send a short abstract (200-300 words) and a biography (100 words) by Monday 23 July to Laura Scalabrella Spada and Lauren Rozenberg at permeablebodies@gmail.com. We will notify applicants by Monday 6 August.

Bursaries available on application. Please visit permeablebodies.wordpress.com for more details on how to apply, updates, and additional information.

 

More infos on the organistor’s website

Colloquium – Asclepius, the Paintbrush, and the Pen: Representations of Disease in Medieval and Early Modern European Art and Literature – May 4/5 – CMRS Medical Humanities Conference (UCLA)

CMRS Medical Humanities Conference

Asclepius, the Paintbrush, and the Pen: Representations of Disease in Medieval and Early Modern European Art and Literature

May 4May 5

Humanity has always approached disease with a mixture of curiosity and dread. Medieval and early modern people were no exception, displaying a deep fascination with virulent ailments and all sorts of physical deformities. But despite this a attraction, few artists of these eras engaged in the depiction of disease. When they did, their expression was particular to the medium used and differed among artists even when using the same medium. Since such an effort was outside their norm, what factors drove them to pick up pen or brush to approach maladies as a subject of esthetic expression? How did the artists’ experiences influence their choices in portraying disease? Were these depictions the result of something that interfered with their intent to faithfully reproduce the best of nature, or do they reflect a rebellion against what we generally assume to be the period`s artistic and literary quest: the portrayal of spiritual beauty and, later, the rediscovered beauty of the human body?

This conference, organized by Professor Massimo Ciavolella (Italian, UCLA) and Professor Rinaldo Canalis, MD (David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA), engages these questions and the contemporary perspective they elicit.

Funding for this symposium is provided by the Endowment for the UCLA Center for Medieval & Renaissance Studies.

 

SATURDAY, MAY 5, 2018 | UCLA ROYCE HALL 314
8:30 AM Registration, coffee
9:00 Welcoming Remarks
Session I | Allison Collins (UCLA), chair
9:15 Francis Wells (Royal Papworth Hospital, Cambridge)
“The Role of the Decorative Arts in Disease”
10:00 Break
10:15 Joachim Küpper (Freie Universität Berlin)
“Malady in Literary Texts from the Medieval and the Early Modern Periods – Some Hypotheses On a Paradoxical Constellation”
11:00 Break
11:15 Gaia Gubbini (Freie Universität Berlin)
“Leprosy, Melancholy, Folly, and their Representations in Medieval French Literature”
12:00 PM Break
12:15 Alain Touwaide (UCLA, The Huntington, and Institute for the Preservation of Medical Traditions )
“The Art of Medicine in Byzantium: Disease and Disability in Byzantine Manuscripts”
1:00 Lunch Break
Session II | Rinaldo Canalis (UCLA), chair
2:15 Domenico Bertoloni Meli (Indiana University Bloomington)
“Textures of Lesions – Textures of Prints”
3:00 Break
3:15 Manuela Gallerani (Università di Bologna)
“Illness in art and art in illness: reflections based on paradigmatic works by Italian Renaissance artists”
4:00 Break
4:15 Sara Frances Burdorff (UCLA)
“‘Yet have I in me something dangerous’: Demonopathy, the Pox, and the Melancholy Dane in Shakespeare’s Hamlet
SATURDAY, MAY 5, 2018 | UCLA ROYCE HALL 314
9:00 Coffee
Session III | Monique Kornell (CMRS Associate), chair
9:30 Valeria Finucci (Duke University)
“The King and the Art of Brain Surgery”
10:15 Break
10:30 Alfonso Paolella (University of Naples)
“The ‘mal franzoso’ between art, history and literature. Paracelso and Della Porta”
11:15 Break
11:30 Efraín Kristal (UCLA)
“Nicolas Poussin’s ‘The Plague at Ashdod’ and the French Disease”
12:15 Lunch Break
Session IV | Guendalina Ajello Mahler (CMRS Associate )
1:30 Jenni Kuuliala (University of Tampere)
“Miracle and the Monstrous: Disability and Deviant Bodies in the Late Middle Ages”
2:15 Break
2:30 Lori Jones (University of Ottawa)
“‘Fevers, Botches, and Carbuncles’: Describing the Plague in Late Medieval and Early Modern Medical Treatises”
3:15 Break
3:30 Roberto Fedi (Università per Stranieri di Perugia)
“The Ailing Artist”
4:15 Concluding Remarks