CFP – Borderlines XXII : sickness, strife and suffering – Queen’s university Belfast – 13-15th April 2018

Queen’s university Belfast presents : Borderlines XXII : sickness, strife and suffering – 13-15th April 2018

We are pleased to invite abstract of ca. 250 words related to pain in the middle ages. Topics may include but are not limited to :

  • collective pain
  • depictions of pain,
  • explanations of pain,
  • judicial literature,
  • medical literature,
  • memory and pain,
  • narratives of suffering,
  • pain and creativity,
  • pain and pleasure,
  • psychological pain,
  • social pain,
  • religious literature,
  • suffering in the afterlife

Please send abstracts of ca. 250 words, along with a short academic biography, to borderlinesxxii@gmail.com

The deadline for abstracts is 5th February 2018.

 

More info on the Bordrelines XXII website.

Call for Papers – Angelical Conjunctions: Crossroads of Medicine and Religion, 1200-1800

McGill University on April 13-15, 2019

“Angelical Conjunction” was the term coined by the seventeenth-century New England Puritan Cotton Mather to denote the mutual affinity of medicine and religion. Indeed, medical and spiritual practices have a long history of coexistence in many religious traditions. This connection took many forms, from the pious provision of health care (in person or through endowed charity), to the archetypal figure of the healing prophet. Yet despite decades of specialized research, a coherent and analytical history of the “angelical conjunction” itself remains elusive.   This conference therefore aims to explore the connection between medicine and religion across the time-span of the late medieval and early modern eras, and  from an intercultural perspective. Taking as our focus the Mediterranean, the Islamic World and Europe, and the various Christianities, Islams and Judaisms that flourished there, we aim to develop methodological and theoretical perspectives on the “angelical conjunction(s)” of these two spheres. How did the entanglement of religion and medicine shape epistemologies in both of these spheres? What are the conceptions of the body and its relationship to the soul that these entanglements assumed or envisioned? What were the limits to coexistence? How did the “conjunction” change over time?

We invite papers on a range of themes that include, but are not limited to:

–         The relationship between spiritual charisma and medical practice
–         The involvement of medical practitioners in theological debates
–         Medicine and “fringe” religious traditions (e.g. Hermetic, heretical, “occult”…)
–         Representations of the healer-prophet or healer-saint in art
–         Debates on body and soul informed by medical and theological knowledge
–         Spiritualization of physical illness
–         Devotion as therapy, and (the provision of) therapy as devotion

Accommodation and meals will be provided. We are seeking grant support to subsidize travel.

Please submit an abstract of 300 words and a CV to Dr. Aslıhan Gürbüzel at angelicalconjunctions@gmail.com by January 10, 2018.

More info on

CFP – Illuminating Hidden Figures, Diversity and Difference in the Middle Ages – New England Medieval Studies Consortium Brown University March 17-18, 2018

Illuminating Hidden Figures

Diversity and Difference in the Middle Ages

New England Medieval Studies Consortium Brown University March 17-18, 2018

The diversity of medieval Europe has come under close scrutiny from all sides. As medievalists have, with increasing vigor, insisted on complex and nuanced understandings of the constitution of both normative European societies and their interactions with those surrounding them, popular ideological movements have sought to claim the medieval past as a homogeneous, `white’ male space. Whether it is studied through art, literature, theology, history, gender and sexuality studies, or any of the other manifold disciplines that comprise medieval studies, the question of diversity and difference in the middle ages thus represents not only an increasingly fruitful avenue of scholarly inquiry, but also a vital interface between academia and the public at large. This conference therefore invites papers which explore this question and its modern implications through intellectual history, scriptural exegesis, art and material culture, pedagogical approaches, philology, literary studies, digital humanities, or any other ways in which diversity and difference in the middle ages can be understood. We also invite papers that address the exchange of culture and material from outside Europe.

We welcome both individual papers and full panel proposals. We also welcome volunteers for chairing panels. Papers should be 20 minutes in length, and may be from any discipline or geographic specialization. Please submit an abstract of no more than 300 words to nemsc.2018@gmail.com by January 1, 2018.

Graduate students whose abstracts are selected for the conference will have the opportunity to submit full papers for consideration for the Alison Goddard Elliott Award.

CFP – Canadian Society for the History of Medicine (CSHM) 2018 / Société canadienne d’histoire de la médecine 2018 – May 26-28, University of Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

Call for Papers: Canadian Society for the History of Medicine (CSHM) 2018

Call for Papers Canadian Society for the History of Medicine (CSHM) 2018 – Deadline 8 December 2017
May 26-28, University of Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

The CSHM will hold its annual meeting and conference on May 26-28 at the University of Regina, in conjunction with the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences. The Programme Committee calls for papers that address the theme of this year’s Congress: “Gathering Diversities.”

Scholars are invited to give papers related to diversity in the history of medicine, health and healing; or that address historical experiences of patient diversity and equity (gender, race, sexuality, ability). Proposals on topics unrelated to the Congress theme are also welcome.

Please submit an abstract and one-page CV for consideration by 20 November 2017 by e-mail to Esyllt Jones, esyllt.jones@umanitoba.ca. Abstracts must not exceed 350 words. We encourage proposals for organised panels of three (3) related papers; in this case, please submit a panel proposal of less than 350 words in addition to an abstract and one-page CV from each presenter. The Committee will notify applicants of its decision by December 15, 2017. Those who accept an invitation to present at the meeting agree to provide French and English versions of the accepted abstract for inclusion in the bilingual Program Book.


Appel de présentations, Société canadienne d’histoire de la médecine (SCHM) 2018 –APPEL A CONTRIBUTION JUSQU’AU 8 DÉCEMBRE
Le 26-28 mai, Université de Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

La SCHM tiendra son congrès annuel le 26-28 mai à l’Université de Regina, dans le cadre du Congrès des sciences humaines. Le comité du programme fait un appel de présentations sur le thème du congrès cette année : « Rassembler les diversités ».

Les chercheurs sont invités à offrir une présentation se rapportant à la diversité dans l’histoire de la médecine, de la santé et de la guérison, ou qui considère des exemples historiques de diversité et d’équité chez les patients (sexe, race, sexualité, capacité). Les présentations sur des thèmes sans rapport avec le thème du Congrès sont également les bienvenues.

Veuillez envoyer un résumé et un CV d’une page pour examen avant le 20 novembre 2017 par courriel à Esyllt Jones, esyllt.jones@umanitoba.ca. Les résumés ne doivent pas dépasser 350 mots. Nous encourageons les propositions de présentations en groupes de trois (3) documents connexes; pour ces cas, veuillez soumettre une proposition de table ronde de moins de 350 mots en plus d’un résumé et d’un CV d’une page pour chaque présentateur. Le Comité avisera les demandeurs de sa décision d’ici le 15 décembre 2017. Ceux qui acceptent l’invitation à présenter au congrès s’engagent à fournir des versions française et anglaise du résumé qu’ils ont soumis pour l’inclusion dans le programme bilingue du congrès.

Plus d’info sur le site des organisateurs.

Table ronde sur l’histoire du handicap – Les rendez-vous de l’Histoire, Blois 2016.

L’histoire du handicap

Cette table ronde vise à débattre des avancées historiographiques dans le champ de l’histoire du handicap. Plusieurs historiens spécialistes du handicap identifieront les apports des recherches effectuées pendant les décennies précédentes, les tendances de la recherche actuelle, et les chantiers de recherche à ouvrir.

Avec

Gildas BREGAIN

 

Christophe CAPUANO

Mariama KABA

Caroline HUSQUIN

 

CFP – Corps hybrides aux frontières de l’humain au Moyen Âge – Université Catholique de Louvain, 19-20 avril 2018

Appel à contribution – Corps hybrides aux frontières de l’humain au Moyen Âge

Colloque international, Université Catholique de Louvain, 19-20 avril 2018
Deadline : 31 décembre 2017

Dans la pensée médiévale, le corps humain fonctionne comme un miroir de l’univers et un modèle pour comprendre la nature, pour interpréter la Bible, pour renforcer les structures sociales et politiques. La déformation et la métamorphose du corps mettent en question cette fonction, surtout quand le corps franchit les frontières entre les différentes espèces et se contamine avec le non-humain, qu’il soit animal, végétal ou objet inanimé.

A l’époque médiévale, la littérature, l’art et la science enjambaient la distance qui sépare l’humain et le non-humain au moyen de créatures hybrides, dont l’identité était marquée par l’ambivalence. Les monstres anthropomorphes, les peuples exotiques censés avoir des traits animaux ou végétaux, les figures humaines intégrant des armes ou d’autres objets dans leurs corps, les animaux ou les plantes portant des ressemblances inquiétantes avec les humains : autant de créations qui dessinaient une constellation de possibilités dans un continuum des êtres.

Si la recherche sur la tératologie s’est parfois occupée de ces combinaisons d’humain et non-humain, les investigations se sont surtout concentrées sur les monstres en tant que représentation de l’altérité. Le temps est venu pour changer de perspective et pour considérer ces corps hybrides comme les produits d’une réflexion sur la possibilité (ou l’impossibilité) de penser l’être humain comme un être fluide et ouvert au non-humain.

Les communications, de la durée d’environ 20 minutes, porteront sur des cas d’interférence du corps humain avec l’animal, le végétal et l’inanimé, et viseront à répondre à des questions telles que : Quelle est la fonction du corps hybride dans la relation à l’humain ? Qu’est-ce qu’il enseigne au lecteur ? Comment l’hybride s’inscrit-t-il dans la représentation de l’identité sociale, politique ou ethnique ?

Modalité de soumission

Nous invitons chaleureusement celles et ceux qui seraient intéressés à nous envoyer une proposition. Cet appel est ouvert aux chercheurs et chercheuses à tous les niveaux de leur carrière, dans les domaines de la littérature, de l’art, de l’histoire culturelle et de l’histoire des sciences du Moyen Âge. Les propositions consisteront en un titre et un résumé de communication d’environ 250 mots, et devront être envoyées à l’adresse antonella.sciancalepore@uclouvain.be avant le 31 décembre 2017.

Comité organisateur

Baudouin Van den Abeele (Université Catholique de Louvain)
Antonella Sciancalepore (Université Catholique de Louvain)
Mattia Cavagna (Université Catholique de Louvain)
Craig Baker (Université Libre de Bruxelles)

Conference – Susan Edgington (Queen Mary, London): Guido of vigevano’s rules of health for an old man going on crusade – 1 march 2018

Conference – Susan Edgington (Queen Mary, London)

Guido of vigevano’s rules of health for an old man going on crusade

1 march 2018, Graduate centre for Medieval Studies,  University of Reading

 

More infos on the university website

CFP – Histories of Disability: local, global and colonial stories – 7-8 June 2018, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK.

Histories of Disability: local, global and colonial stories

7-8 June 2018, University of Sheffield, Sheffield, UK.

Back in 2001, the historian of American deafness Douglas Baynton argued that ‘Disability is everywhere in history, once you begin looking for it, but conspicuously absent in the histories we write’ (Baynton, 2001, p. 52). Since then the history of disability has burgeoned with many important studies showing this not only to be a significant field but a vibrant one. But several key areas remain to be thoroughly interrogated. The historiography remains largely limited to America and western Europe, historians have been slow to take up the exciting postcolonial questions explored by literary scholars and sociologists about the relationship between colonialism and disability, and a tendency has remained to treat the western experience of disability as a universal one. This workshop aims to interrogate these biases, shed light on geographical specificity of disability and think more about the global history of disability both empirically and theoretically.

Questions of interest might include, but are not limited to

· How is the experience and construction of disability specific to time and place?

· What is the relationship between the local and the global when considering the history of disability?

· How does disability intersect with other identities (such as race, gender, class and religion)?

· What is the relationship between disability and imperialism/colonialism?

· How can postcolonial theory help us better historicise the experience of disability?

· Does the concept of ‘disability’ itself work outside a western context?

· How are the histories of disability shaped by mobility, movement and travel?

Abstracts of c. 300 words should be sent to Esme Cleall, e.r.cleall@sheffield.ac.uk by 1st December 2017. I’d also be happy to answer any questions.

Contact Info:
Esme Cleall, University of Sheffield, e.r.cleall@sheffield.ac.uk
Contact Email:
e.r.cleall@sheffield.ac.uk

CFP – The Worlds that plague made – NYU Medieval and Renaissance Center – 13-14 april 2018

More info on the organisator website.

CFP – Monstrous Monarch/Royal Monsters at MAP 2018 in Las Vegas, April 12-15.

CFP for Monstrous Monarch/Royal Monsters at MAP 2018 in Las Vegas, NV April 12-15.

Organised by Medieval Association of the Pacific, the Rocky Mountain Medieval and the Renaissance Association

Medieval and early modern societies defined monstrosity in a multitude of ways, assigning the term to figures representing the supernatural “other” and to those representing human alterities. Monsters filled the national consciousness of societies throughout the medieval and early modern worlds. Indeed, the monster became an allegory for a society’s relativisms and fears. So, what happens when the monster is the monarch him or herself—or when the monster is a member of the royal family? How might the term be defined differently or specifically for the sake of this unique person? What special circumstances might be attached to the term and its parameters when the monarch and his or her relationship to the State and its people is concerned? Monarchs of the medieval and early modern periods were deeply concerned about their legacies, and prioritized the public memory of their reigns and dynasties very highly. Similarly, literary and artistic representations of royalty and monarchs often showcase the concerns of dynasty, heredity, and reputation. How is public memory affected when the monarch, or a member of a royal dynasty, is remembered as monstrous for posterity? Moreover, how is royal legacy affected when the term “monster” becomes attached to the monarch while he or she is still living?

MEARCSTAPA invites proposals in all disciplines of the humanities and for all nations, regions, language groups, and cultures of the medieval and early modern periods globally. Please send proposals of 250 words maximum to Asa Mittman asmittman@csuchico.edu, Thea Tomaini tmtomaini@gmail.com, and Ilan Mitchell-Smith Ilan.mitchellsmith@csulb.edu by 14 November 2017.

History of Disease, Disability & Medicine in Medieval Europe