CFP – Medieval Bodies Ignored: Politics, Culture & Flesh – organised by BodiesIgnored at University of Leeds, Institute For Medieval Studies – 4-6 may 2018

Medieval Bodies Ignored: Politics, Culture & Flesh

University of Leeds, Institute For Medieval Studies

Friday 4th to Sunday 6th May 2018

This interdisciplinary conference will concentrate upon the cultural history of the body, particularly that relating to bodies that are ignored, by either medieval society or modern scholarship. This conference is interested in building up a sensory and somatic understanding of daily corporeal existence in the Middle Ages, with a particular focus on those elements of medieval society that are both seen and unseen.  The weary carthorse, the one-legged beggar and the cradle-bound child were all bodies that were ubiquitous and thus/yet invisible; by attempting to access those elements of this landscape that were tacitly understood at the time, but difficult for the modern scholar to access, this conference hopes to encourage a richer understanding of the complexity of medieval life and culture.

Abstract submissions from a variety of disciplines are encouraged and we hope to be able to curate an exchange of ideas, strategies and theories with which we can develop a methodological support structure for interdisciplinary cultural studies.

 

Themes :

— Marginalised bodies (Socially, physically, legally)

— The body politic

— Seeing the unseen

— Knowledge of the body and bodily customs

— Artisans of the body, expanding notions of health and medicine

— The ignored body in space and place (e.g. war, urban/ rural, court/ Cloister)

— Ignored bodies: Dead, dis / abled, sacred, non—human animal, child, supernatural, female, racially othered, or otherwise overlooked due to status

— Methodological tactics for studying the overlooked body

Please submit abstracts for 20 min paper (max 300 words) by 28th February 2018 midday GMT to Email: medievalbodiesignored@gmail.com
Twitter: @bodiesignored

 

More infos on the organiser’s website

 

CFP – IMC Leeds – Medieval Bodies Ignored

Medieval Bodies Ignored
CfP IMC 2018: Deadline 31St August 2017

Since Caroline Walker Bynum’s 1995 article ‘Why All the Fuss
About the Body?’, the discussion around bodies as historical
bodies has flourished. In these sessions, the intent is to pick out,
from ‘the cacophony of discourses’ that medieval people used to
discuss the body, a few of the notes that are sometimes
overlooked. Discussion post—Caroline Walker Bynum has often
focused on the human body, but her work has also opened up a
wider examination of the ways in which non —human bodies were
conceptualised. Non-human animals, environmental bodies and
socio-political bodies are all discussed in relation to humans and
the non-human body. Equally, humans could also be discussed in
relation to non-human bodies, either in a positive or a derogatory
sense. These sessions will explore how human and non-human
bodies have influenced each other during the Middle Ages and in
scholarship. By examining these seemingly separate discourses in
concert with one another the impact of ideas around
embodiment upon the study of the Middle Ages is revealed and parallels and connections can be exploited.

Themes

‘ Discourses around human and non-human animal bodies:
scientific, literary, juridico—legal.

‘ Concepts of environmental bodies: bodies of water,
geological and geographical bodies, human / non—human
geography.

‘ Political and social bodies: the body politic, the politicised
body, guilds and professional bodies, military bodies.

 

The deadline for 200 – 300 word abstracts is 31st August 2017. Please email: medievalbodiesignored@gmail.com. And follow them on Twitter: @BodiesIgnored

 

Roundtable – #disIMC: Current Challenges to Accessibility and Ways Forward

#disIMC: Current Challenges to Accessibility and Ways Forward

At the IMC 2017, Medievalists with Disabilities hosted its first event. #disIMC was a bring your own lunch affair, slotted into the timetable at the last minute. It was a great success, and marked the beginning of the Medievalists with Disabilities (#dismed) network. We are now moving into more official outlets for discussion, and are putting together a Roundtable for IMC 2018.

We invite abstracts for 5 minute talks as part of a roundtable discussion about accessibility in Higher Education and ways that we can address issues. We take the term disabilities in the broadest possible sense, incorporating invisible and visible conditions, chronic illness and mental health to name but a few. Papers might address issues individuals have overcome in Higher Education, discuss what it is like to be in HE with a disability/chronic condition, or pinpoint an issue that needs addressing.

Please send an abstract of no more than 150 words outlining your talk to alexralee12@gmail.com by August 20th [deadline extended : 15 september !]

CFP – Interiority and Alterity- Hortulus Journal – Fall 2017

Call for Papers: Fall 2017 Themed Issue, “Interiority and Alterity”

Hortulus: The Online Graduate Journal of Medieval Studies is a refereed, peer-reviewed, and born-digital journal devoted to the culture, literature, history, and society of the medieval past. Published semi-annually, the journal collects exceptional examples of work by graduate students on a number of themes, disciplines, subjects, and periods of medieval studies. We also welcome book reviews of monographs published or re-released in the past five years that are of interest to medievalists. For the Fall issue we are particularly interested in reviews of books which fall under the current special topic.

Interiority refers to personal emotions, ideals, and beliefs in addition to self-reflection and inner consciousness. Recent scholarship in Cultural Studies asks how these elements of interiority may impact upon culture more broadly, and the extent to which culture impacts interiority. With alterity we refer not only to the state of being ‘other’ or different, but also to the study of how this difference is created. Within the framework of such study a mutual interrogation between center and periphery remains critical in order to prevent a reproduction of cycles of hegemony. In this context, the concepts of interiority and alterity both complement and contrast with each other: to echo Iain Chambers (himself echoing Heidegger), we refer to what unfolds towards us and away from us, to what both envelopes and exceeds us (“Signs of Silence, Lines of Listening”, The Postcolonial Question: Common Skies, Divided Horizons ed. I. Chambers and L. Curti, pp. 47-63 at p. 54).

For our Fall 2017 themed issue we invite proposals that critically engage with the concepts of interiority and alterity, both as separate concepts and in relation to each other. We hope to attract articles offering comparative and multidisciplinary perspectives, and welcome contributions from the fields of history, art history, literary scholarship, archeology, anthropology, or any other discipline that will contribute to our thinking about the application of these concepts and their broader theoretical contexts in the medieval period. We are particularly interested in submissions that take a more methodology-focused approach and those which engage with the materiality of interiority and alterity in the Middle Ages. Hortulus additionally suggests that contributors familiarize themselves with the current scholarship surrounding the use of the terms ‘Otherness’ and alterity.

Contributions should be in English and roughly 6,000–12,000 words, including all documentation and citational apparatus; book reviews are typically between 500-1,000 words but cannot exceed 2,000. All notes must be endnotes, and a bibliography must be included; submission guidelines can be found here. Contributions may be submitted to hortulus[at]hortulus-journal[dot]com and are due 25 September 2017. If you are interested in submitting a paper but feel you would need additional time, please send a query email and details about an expected time-scale for your submission. Queries about submissions or the journal more generally can also be sent to this address.

More on the Hortulus Journal website

CFP – ICMS Kzoo 2018 – Disability, Devotion, and Subjectivity in Medieval and Renaissance England

CFP – ICMS Kzoo 2018 – Disability, Devotion, and Subjectivity in Medieval and Renaissance England

This panel invites trans-historical and trans-disciplinary examinations of pre-modern disability studies, focusing particularly on the construction of the devotional subject across the lines of periodicity. Medievalists and early modernists working in the burgeoning field of disability studies have shown that “disability” was an operative category in premodern texts, with subjects constituted by different or “non-standard” bodies, minds, and spirits. This roundtable proposes to extend this conversation by turning to religious experience and devotion, an important discursive field for the construction of identity by marginalized and/or minority groups.

Devotional manuals, spiritual biographies, and hagiographies – both before and after the Reformation – involve disclosures and depictions of impairment, asking their audiences to identify with a construction of ability related to devotional practice. Questions participants might ask include:
· What constitutes a “non-standard” body in pastoral, contemplative, and narrative devotional writing?
· How do figurative and allegorical depictions of disabled bodies in religious literature construct the disabled subject?
· What accommodations should be accepted for a disabled body to attain a recommended devotional posture?
· How does devotional didacticism approach variation in sensory acuity?
· How are devotional communities and cultures defined by conceptions of ability and impairment?
· Under which circumstances is the attainment of a-typical ability the aim of devotional practice?
· How might legal and ethical debates about injury, loss, and retribution be shaped by conceptions of impairment?

This roundtable invites a conversation on how devotional practices, and the very nature of devotion, evolved with (or stubbornly resisted) the Protestant and Catholic Reformations, reshaping the construction of the disabled subject. We invite a range of approaches, including contemporary theoretical lenses on disability studies as well as historical and literary-formal examinations of the subject.

Please send 300-word abstracts for ten-minute roundtable papers to José Villagrana (jvillagr@bates.edu) and Spencer Strub (spencer.strub@berkeley.edu) by September 15, 2017.

CFP – ‘THE ALL-SEEING EYE’: Vision and Eyesight Across Time and Cultures Workshop, 2018

‘THE ALL-SEEING EYE’: Vision and Eyesight Across Time and Cultures Workshop, 2018

The workshop will take place at Swansea University on Wednesday 11 April 2018. It is hosted by the Research Group for Health, History and Culture, and the Effaced from History? research network on facial appearance.

 

A call for papers has been issued for this workshop which will explore medical, social, and cultural meanings of the eye and vision in contemporary and historical perspective. Vision has often provoked fascination within societies and cultures as the most revered sense. In Western Europe, the eye has been viewed scientifically as the most ‘exquisite’ organ, or spiritually as a ‘window to the soul’. These positions have had an influence on how the eye has been perceived, both as a vital organ and, by implication, one that needed to be protected. Whilst the eye could bring delight to its holder, and be symbolic in a variety of ways, it could also, when lost, incur significant impairment. The workshop will explore this vision impairment and correction, and the extent to which sight loss has been stigmatised. It will welcome papers that explore eyesight and its meanings across time and place, to encourage trans-historical and interdisciplinary discussion. Possible subjects include but are not restricted to:

  • Concepts of the eye within scientific, medical, theological or cultural texts and images
  • Vision in relation to the other senses
  • Testing vision
  • Experiences of sight loss, total and partial
  • Restoring and regaining vision
  • Eye loss: stigma and disfigurement
  • Eye contact, staring and social interaction
  • Adornments to the eye: cosmetics, masks, vision aids and prosthetics
  • Visual and literary representations of the eye
  • Challenges to ableist narratives relating to sight loss and visual impairment.

‌The workshop will take place at Swansea University on Wednesday 11 April 2018. It is hosted by the Research Group for Health, History and Culture, and the Effaced from History? research network on facial appearance.

We invite proposals for twenty-minute papers. Proposals of no more than 200 words, together with the name and institutional affiliation of the speaker should be sent to Gemma Almond at gemma.almond@sciencemuseum.ac.uk or 655580@swansea.ac.uk. The closing date for submissions is 1st December 2017.

RIAH branding - long

The workshop is convened by Professor David Turner, Swansea University and PhD candidate Gemma Almond, Swansea University and the Science Museum, London.

More info on the effaces history project.

 

CFP – Remembering Communities and Others in Early Medieval Europe – IMC Leeds 2018

Remembering Communities and Others in Early Medieval Europe

 (Leeds 2-5 July 2018)

 

‘Hearing these complaints and others like them continually, I commemorate the past, in order that it may come to the knowledge of the future.’

Gregory of Tours, Preface to Decem libri historiarum

Following the success of the ‘Creating Communities and Others’ sessions at the IMC 2017, we seek to continue our investigations of these concepts within the context of the special thematic strand of the IMC 2018: ‘Memory’. As the organisers note, there are many kinds of memory, which permeate the writing of history, for modern scholars as much as our medieval predecessors. In these sessions, we seek to examine how memory can be put to use as a tool for creating or perpetuating ideas of community and otherness.

The purpose of these sessions is to investigate the use of memory in the construction and dissemination of notions of community and otherness in early medieval Europe. Both communities and Others could exist on a variety of levels, from the community of a monastery to the community of a kingdom, or from a group of heretics to non-Christian peoples in lands near or far. But what were the histories behind such groups? What were their origin stories, and how were these used? Why were some members of the community remembered, while others were forgotten? How were contemporary communities and Others connected to imagined distant places and times? How were the historical relationships between different groups remembered? What particular factors contributed to memories of community and otherness, and how were these altered or retained during the Early Middle Ages?

We hope to bring together papers that address these and related questions in order to examine the cultures of early medieval Europe as seen through the ways in which inhabitants of the region understood their place in the wider world. Paper proposals are welcome from all disciplines, including history, art history, archaeology, literary studies and manuscript studies.

Possible topics and themes may include but are not limited to:

  • Continuity and change in writing about communities and Others
  • The impact of political events on memories of community and Otherness
  • Shared histories for networks of communities
  • Memories from the peripheries
  • Class, Community and Otherness
  • Gender, Community and Otherness
  • Religion, Community and Otherness
  • Memories of relations between the West and the Byzantine and Muslim worlds
  • Uses of material culture in the remembrance of communities and Others

After the IMC, we hope to publish the contributions to these sessions as a volume of collected essays through our sponsor Kısmet Press.

Please send abstracts of no more than 300 words to Ricky Broome (rickybroome@hotmail.com) by 3 September 2017.

 

More info on this website.

Erin Connelly on Medieval Medicine for Modern Infections at the Library of Congress

 

Erin Connelly discussed her research involving the emergence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria, combined with a severely stalled discovery pipeline for new antibiotics.

Speaker Biography: Erin Connelly is the CLIR-Mellon Fellow for Data Curation in medieval studies in the Schoenberg Institute for Manuscript Studies in the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts (Penn Libraries).

CFP: Representing Infirmity: Diseased Bodies in Renaissance and Early Modern Italy – Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies – Monash University Centre in Prato

CFP: Representing Infirmity: Diseased Bodies in Renaissance and Early Modern Italy

Students currently enrolled in a Master’s or Doctoral program are invited to submit a project for “Representing Infirmity: Diseased Bodies in Renaissance and Early Modern Italy,” an international conference to be held at the Monash University Centre in Prato on December 13-15, 2017. The event is organized by John Henderson (Birkbeck, University of London and Monash University), a historian of medicine, Fredrika Jacobs (Virginia Commonwealth University) and Jonathan Nelson (Syracuse University in Florence), both historians of art, and Peter Howard (Monash University, Melbourne), a historian and Director of the Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies at Monash (Melbourne and Prato).

The conference will be the first to explore how diseased bodies were represented in Italy during the ‘long Renaissance,’ from the early 1400s through ca. 1650. Many individual studies by historians of art and the history of medicine address specific aspects of this subject, yet there has never been an attempt to define or explore the broader topic. Moreover, most studies interpret Renaissance images and texts through the lens of current under-tandings about disease. This conference avoids the pitfalls of retrospective diagnosis. Accordingly, proposed projects should look beyond the modern category of ‘disease’ to view ‘infirmity’ in Galenic humoural terms.

The event begins with a keynote lecture by John Henderson on December 13, followed by two days of papers by (in alphabetical order): Sheila Barker, Danielle Carrabino, Peter Howard, Fredrika Jacobs, Jenni Kuuliala, Jonathan Nelson, Diana Bullen Presciutti, Paolo Savoia, Michael Stolberg, and Evelyn Welch. For topics, see below.

Graduate students are invited to participate in the ‘poster session.’ Selection will begin on 15 August 2017. Grant recipients will produce a PDF for a poster that illustrates one aspect of how infirmity was represented in Renaissance Italy. The poster will be exhibited at the Monash Prato Centre, and an electronic version will be posted on the conference webpage. During the conference, students will give short presentations of their work. These junior colleagues are invited to all meals, and encouraged to participate in discussions; they may be invited to submit their paper for publication in the acts of the conference. Students will be provided with up to $500 for economy transportation, plus hotel and meals in Prato for the three-day event. Given the terms of this grant, priority will be given to US students and students in US programs, but all students are encouraged to apply.

Applicants must be currently enrolled in a Doctoral or a research-based Master’s program. Applications should be sent via email to Infirmity2017@gmail.com, and must include the following:

  1. Academic Summary (university level only): a) name and address of current institution, b) title of program, c) short description of thesis (ca. 200 words), d) expected date of completion, e) name and address of advisor, and f) name and address of second academic or professional reference.
  2. Professional Summary: a list of relevant work experience and/or publications.
  3. Proposal: title, and short description (ca. 200 words). Proposals should address one the following topics:
    • What infirmities are depicted in visual culture, in what context, why, and when?
    • How did the idea and representations of infirmities change over the 15th-17th centuries?
    • How, did awareness of new diseases in this period inform the visual representation of infirmity?
    • How did these representations change across media (altarpieces, sculptures, votive images, prints, book illustrations)?
    • What was the relationship between images and texts, principally medical, religious, and literary?
    • How and why did representations of infirmity differ in popular versus learned texts?

The Conference is organized by Centre for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, Monash University Prato, as part of the “Body in the City Arts Focus Research Program.”

Funding for graduate students is provided by the Samuel H. Kress Foundation, administered through Syracuse University.

 

See the CFP in its original environment

New publication – Premodern Dis/ability history. A Companion – Didymos pub.

Cordula Nolte, Bianca Frohne, Uta Halle, Sonja Kerth (Eds): A Handbook of Pre-Modern Dis/ability History (Didymos)

 

 

Pre-order here

 

« Covering the period from 500 to 1800, this volume serves as a comprehensive guide into the growing field of dis/ability history. Its contributions by 80 international scholars present groundbreaking research in various historical disciplines, often unearthing hitherto unknown material and highlighting premodern societies from unfamiliar perspectives. The wide range of approaches and subjects comprises theoretical and methodological frameworks, general questions of gender, life-cycle and social status, daily life experiences,work and sustenance, legal norms and practices, strategies of coping and of self-help, medical therapies, organisation of care, emotions and religious interpretations. Compact information, vivid case studies and rich visual material grant an enjoyable and instructive reading for audiences who wish to explore premodern culture on innovative paths. »

 

Since the turn of the century, dis/ability history has been established as a promising, international field of research that enables us to look at historical cultures and societies from a completely new point of view, based on the analytical category of dis/ability. The number of relevant projects and publications is growing, methods and topics are in constant development. At the same time, various intersections with different current approaches within historical scholarship and cultural studies emerge. The combination of these aspects turns the attention of the academia and the wider public to this new research perspective.
However, there is hardly any information available about the self-conception of dis/ability history, about its theories, methods and sources, and about its specific aims, subjects and leading questions. Whereas international dis/ability studies, which laid the groundwork for dis/ability history, have already put forth several handbooks, introductions and readers, dis/ability history is still in need of reference works wherein its basics are presented in a concise, readable, and systematic fashion.
This deficit is especially noticeable with regard to pre-modern dis/ability history, which is even more recent than modern dis/ability history, and where particular challenges have to be met, mainly due to the specifics of medieval and early modern sources. As there has been considerable output within a growing number of essays and edited volumes, but not often in form of monographs yet, it is quite difficult to keep track of research activities and to gain advanced insight into central fields of research.

This is where our handbook comes in. It addresses a diverse audience, including students and renowned scholars as well as interest groups, activists within the fields of politics, culture, education and social work who advocate empowerment and work towards social inclusion, as well as the general public with an interest in history.
The handbook aims to present the current state of research with regard to various disciplines, combining concise information with an accessible presentation based on primary sources and an arrangement of topics that captivates the reader’s interest.

The handbook

  • values interdisciplinarity: topics will be addressed by various disciplines, especially history, literary studies and linguistics, archaeology, anthropology, art history, sociology, religious studies, and theology.
  • brings together international authors (about 80 contributors).
  • is based on primary sources throughout.
  • explicitly addresses controversies regarding different research tendencies and methodologies.
  • combines diachronic and synchronic perspectives, applying a perspective of longue durée whenever possible.
  • entails articles in English and German (the latter being accompanied by English summaries).

 

Didymos-Verlag

Lange Straße 11 · D-71563 Affalterbach

Postfach 11 08 · D-71561 Affalterbach

Tel +49 71 44 › 26 11 791 · Fax +49 71 44 › 26 11 792

für Bestellungen / for orders

info@didymos-verlag.de · www.didymos-verlag.de

More infos on the Homo debilis Creative Unite website

History of Disease, Disability & Medicine in Medieval Europe