CFP – Medieval Academy Graduate Students · The Program in Medieval Studies, Princeton University “Vulnerability in the Middle Ages”

Vulnerability in the Middle Ages

Princeton University, Medieval Academy Graduate Students

At a moment that has brought economic, political, and physical vulnerabilities (new and old) abruptly to the surface, we invite papers on the topic of vulnerability and insecurity in the Middle Ages. Recent scholarship in medieval poverty, gender, disability, and racial difference has greatly enhanced our sense of the variety of vulnerable experiences, and we seek to connect these conversations through their shared perspective on power. We welcome proposals from a variety of disciplines on vulnerability and the concepts that surround it, including weakness, insecurity, injury, disability, and difference. Papers might consider both the portrayal and the experience of the vulnerable life, as well as the systems that lead to vulnerability. We are interested both in the conditions that made individuals vulnerable within communities, and in those that threatened communities within larger polities. In a period where vulnerability typically precluded creating and maintaining records, unfamiliar readings of familiar sources are especially necessary, as are approaches that access vulnerable experiences in imaginative ways. Such approaches might challenge more conventional relationships between scholars and their objects of study, and ask how scholarship itself can perpetuate, create, or mitigate vulnerabilities in the past and present.

Some themes might include, but are not limited to:

– Contradictory perspectives on vulnerability (sympathy/revulsion, admiration/contempt)
– How difference (racial, gender, physical, economic, geographic) contributes to vulnerability
– Vulnerabilities specific to catastrophes, including war, famine, disease, and panic
– The relationship of systems of power to vulnerability
– The experience and portrayal of physical vulnerability
– The treatment (medical or otherwise) of vulnerable conditions
– Religious practices and perspectives on weakness
– “Vulnerability” in other words, such as vernacular translations and terminologies
– Documenting vulnerability and (materially, philologically, hermeneutically) vulnerable documents
– Populations vulnerable to scholarship, via origin or identity myths, institutions, and ideologies

Please submit your abstract (250 words) for a fifteen-minute presentation to the conference organizers (medievalvulnerabilities@gmail.com) by February 15th, 2017.

All abstracts should be in English, and include your name, contact information, and academic affiliation.

CFP – Lived religion and everyday life through earlymodern catholic hagiography – Finland Institute in Rome

Lived religion and everyday life through earlymodern catholic hagiography – Finland Institute in Rome

Final submission of articles: Autumn 2013

Studies on medieval social and cultural history have already for several decades demonstrated the rich possibilities hagiographic material can offer the historian interested in everyday life, lived religion and society. Since the late fifteenth century, this material has experienced an unprecedented growth in volume. Nevertheless. there is still a great need for studies on lived religion and everyday life portrayed through early modem catholic hagiographic material.

To address this need. we invite abstracts for contributions on the subject from scholars worthy with early modem (ca. 15km” centuries) hagiographic material. such as beatification and canonisation processes. other miracle accounts. art, vitae. and other spiritual (autobiographies. The aim is to produce a high-quality collection of articles, which offers cutting-edge and fruitful insights into early modern social and cultural history, using hagiographic texts and art as sources. We especially welcome communications, which have a sensitive approach to gender, age, health and social status.

The deadline for submitting abstracts is the end of February 2017. Twelve most promising abstracts will be selected. it funding cm be secured, the article drafts will be discussed it May 2018 in a workshop organised at the Finnish Institute in Rome (Vita Lante). The collection of articles will be submitted to an international publisher following the peer-review process soon after the meeting, in autumn 2018.

Suitable article topics for the collection will include. but are not limited to:

  • family and household, gender roles
  • health, body, dis/ability, illness, and cure
  • death and salvation
  • religious practices and materiality of religion
  • identity and community

    Please send an abstract of no more than 300 words for an English article and a short biography including name, affiliation and the most important publications, to earlymodernhagiography@gmail.com by Tuesday February 28th. 2017.

Editors and contact informations:
Jenni Kuuliala
PhD. Postdoctoral Researcher (Academy of Finland)
University of Tampere

Podcast – Musique et folie au Moyen Âge – Martine Clouzot

Musique et folie au Moyen Âge – Martine Clouzot

Un air d’histoire Par Karine Le Bail

Vivant décalé de la société, le musicien du Moyen Âge est un marginal. Sujet à instabilité et pauvreté, la folie lui est souvent associée par les instances religieuses, politiques, culturelles, et plus particulièrement encore dans les enluminures datant de 1200 à 1500, à destination des laïcs.

 

Lien du podcast

Lien Itunes

 

Martine Clouzot, professeure en histoire du Moyen Âge à l’Université de Bourgogne à Dijon. Spécialisée notamment sur la question musicale et des “fous” de l’époque, elle a été co-commissaire de l’exposition “Moyen Âge, entre ordre et désordre”, présentée en 2004 à la Cité de la Musique à Paris. Auteure de Musique, folie et nature au Moyen Âge. Les figurations du fou musicien dans les manuscrits enluminés (XIIIe-XVe s.), elle est notre invitée pour nous dévoiler une partie de cet univers riche, déconcertant et passionnant.
Vous pouvez retrouver sa biographie complète ici.

 

Plus d’informations sur le Podcast ici.

New publication – Coming soon : “Living with Disfigurement in Early Medieval Europe” by Patricia Skinner

51704299

Living with Disfigurement in Early Medieval Europe

by Patricia Skinner

This book examines social and medical responses to the disfigured face in early medieval Europe, arguing that the study of head and facial injuries can offer a new contribution to the history of early medieval medicine and culture, as well as exploring the language of violence and social interactions. Despite the prevalence of warfare and conflict in early medieval society, and a veritable industry of medieval historians studying it, there has in fact been very little attention paid to the subject of head wounds and facial damage in the course of war and/or punitive justice. The impact of acquired disfigurement —for the individual, and for her or his family and community—is barely registered, and only recently has there been any attempt to explore the question of how damaged tissue and bone might be treated medically or surgically. In the wake of new work on disability and the emotions in the medieval period, this study documents how acquired disfigurement is recorded across different geographical and chronological contexts in the period.

About the author: Patricia Skinner is Research Professor in Arts and Humanities at Swansea University, UK. She is the Director of the Effaced from History project, sponsored by the Wellcome Trust, and has previously published books on gender, medicine, and health, in addition to the social history of southern Italy.

Review (on the ditor website): “In this uncommonly refreshing contribution to the vibrant historical discourse on marginalisation, Skinner engages with current concerns beyond her chronological and thematic focus, while eschewing anachronism and reductionism. With ample evidence and spirited argument, she challenges widespread generalisations about past attitudes—and exposes persistent prejudices—towards the physically different.” (Luke Demaitre, Visiting Professor, Center for Biomedical Ethics and Humanities, University of Virginia, and author of “Leprosy in Premodern Medicine: A Malady of the Whole Body”)

Table of contents

 

  • Introduction: Writing and Reading About Medieval Disfigurement

  • The Face, Honor and “Face”

  • Disfigurement, Authority and the Law

  • Stigma and Disfigurement: Putting on a Brave Face?

  • Defacing Women: The Gendering of Disfigurement

 

 

More infos on the editor’s website

 

New publication – Childhood Disability and Social Integration in the Middle Ages, by Jenni Kuuliala

 See original image

 

Childhood Disability and Social Integration in the Middle Ages.

Constructions of Impairments in Thirteenth- and Fourteenth-Century Canonization Processes

by Jenni Kuuliala

 

In this volume, testimonies from medieval canonization processes are (for the first time) systematically used as sources for the study of medieval attitudes and everyday life concerning physical impairments, particularly of children.

This volume offers new insights into medieval disability studies by analysing miracle testimonies from canonization processes as sources for the study of medieval attitudes to and understanding of childhood physical impairments: how they were defined, and the social consequences of childhood disability on the family, on the community, and on children themselves.

In these texts, laypeople from different social groups carefully described events leading to children’s miraculous cures of physical impairments, as well as the conditions themselves. They thus provide an exceptionally rich (yet hitherto unexplored) window into the ways in which medieval society defined, explained, and understood children’s impairments.

Besides simply describing disabilities and miraculous cures, these testimonies also reveal various aspects of everyday experiences and communal attitudes towards impaired children. The few testimonies by the children themselves offer fascinating insights into personal experiences of physical disability and how disability affected a child’s socialization and the formation of identity.

This study thus aims to tease apart the often-complex ways in which medieval society both viewed physical differences and how it chose to (re)construct these differences in the discourse of the miraculous, as well as in everyday life.

 

Table of Contents

Introduction

Chapter 1: Family and the Conceptions of Impairment

Chapter 2: Community and the Impaired Child

Chapter 3: Reconstructing Lived Experience

Chapter 4: Conclusions: Impairment and Social Inclusion

Bibliography

 

Find more information on the editor’s bewsite

Rechercher dans OpenEdition Search

Vous allez être redirigé vers OpenEdition Search