CFP – Leeds 2017 – Leprosy and Power

Leeds IMC 2017 – Leprosy and Power

As next year’s IMC theme of ‘Otherness’ lends itself perfectly to the topic of medieval leprosy, I would like to propose a session on the subject of Leprosy and Power, following on from this year’s successful sessions about Leprosy and Identity. In this session, I would like to explore the various ways in which lepers interacted with medieval authorities – how authorities may have attempted to control the behaviour of lepers in their community, how lepers related to those in power, and how they fitted into a social hierarchy.

Possible topics could include:

· Leprosy and the elite

· Municipal authority and common law

· Canon law and the church

· The power of leprosy in society

· Lepers and social status – before / after diagnosis

Proposals should include a title, abstract (approximately 100 words), and institutional affiliation.

Please submit paper proposals by email to Katie Phillips, University of Reading – k.phillips@pgr.reading.ac.uk – by Friday 9th September.

Via Katie Phillips on Academia

CFP – Leeds 2017 – Health and Medicine in the Early Medieval West

Call for papers – Health and Medicine in the Early Medieval West – IMC Leeds 2017

We are inviting papers for sessions at IMC Leeds 2017 on Health and Medicine in the Early Medieval West. Despite important new work, early medieval medicine still remains quarantined from the mainstream of early medieval historiography. The aim of these sessions is to diagnose and treat this historiographical “otherness” by bringing health and medicine into conversation with other areas of early medieval historiography, and by using health and medicine as ways of exploring early medieval societies.

Papers on post-Roman, pre-university medicine and/or health from c.500-c.1000 are welcomed on any of the following themes:

a) Situating medical texts and traditions

Possible topics: what counts (and counted) as a medical text/tradition in the early middle ages; continuation of, adaptation of or deviation from medical traditions; manuscript contexts of medical texts; authors and audiences; social, political and/or intellectual contexts of medical learning.

b) Medical ideas outside medical texts

Possible topics: migration of ideas within or outside medical texts; bibliographical evidence (e.g. library catalogues) for medical learning; medical learning and the laity; medical metaphors; health and medicine in pastoral rhetoric; liturgy as medicinal.

c) Moving beyond texts

Possible topics: interdisciplinary approaches to early medieval health; use of aDNA, palaeopathology and bioarchaeology; material culture of health; comparative history.

d) Humans and other animals

Possible topics: animal products in medical practice; health implications of interactions between humans and animals; analogies between human and animal medicine; veterinary medicine.

If interested, please send your details, paper title and an informal abstract to Zubin Mistry (zubin.mistry@ed.ac.uk) and Claire Burridge (cpsb2@cam.ac.uk) by Friday 9th September. Please get in touch if you have any questions and please do pass on the CFP to anyone who may be interested.

CFP – The Medieval Brain Workshop, University of York, March 10th and 11th, 2017.

The Medieval Brain Workshop. University of York, 10th & 11th March 2017.

As we research aspects of the medieval brain, we encounter complications generated by medieval thought and twenty-first century medicine and neurology alike. Our understanding of modern-day neurology, psychiatry, disability studies, and psychology rests on shifting sands. Not only do we struggle with medieval terminology concerning the brain, but we have to connect it with a constantly-moving target of modern understanding. Though we strive to avoid interpreting the past using presentist terms, it is difficult – or impossible – to work independently of the framework of our own modern understanding. This makes research into the medieval brain and ways of thinking both challenging and exciting. As we strive to know more about specifically medieval experiences, while simultaneously widening our understanding of the brain today, we much negotiate a great deal of complexity.

In this two-day workshop, to be held at the University of York on Friday 10th and Saturday 11th March 2017 under the auspices of the Centre for Chronic Diseases and Disorders, we will explore the topic of ‘the medieval brain’ in the widest possible sense. The ultimate aim is to provide a forum for discussion, stimulating new collaborations from a multitude of voices on, and approaches to, the theme.

This call is for papers to comprise a series of themed sessions of papers and/or roundtables that approach the subject from a range of different, or an interweaving of, disciplines. Potential topics of discussion might include, but are not restricted to:

  • Mental health
  • Neurology
  • The history of emotions
  • Disability and impairment
  • Terminology and the brain
  • Ageing and thinking
  • Retrospective diagnosis and the Middle Ages
  • Interdisciplinary practice and the brain
  • The care of the sick
  • Herbals and medieval medical texts

Research that grapples with terminology, combines unconventional disciplinary approaches, and/or sparks debates around the themes is particularly welcome. We will be encouraging diversity, and welcome speakers from all backgrounds, including those from outside of traditional academia. All efforts will be made to ensure that the conference is made accessible to those who are not able to attend through live-tweeting and through this blog.

Please send abstracts of up to 250 words for independent papers, or expressiond of interest for roundtable topics/themed paper panels, by Friday 21st October, to Deborah Thorpe at: deborah.thorpe@york.ac.uk.

 

Find the Call for paper on their blog for a two-day interdisciplinary workshop, supported by the Centre for Chronic Diseases and Disorders at the University of York.

CFP – ICMS Kalamazoo 2017: “Grey Matter: Brains, Diseases, and Disorders”

Call for papers: ICMS Kalamazoo 2017

“Grey Matter: Brains, Diseases, and Disorders”

Special session organised by Deborah Thorpe, Centre for Chronic Diseases and Disorders at the University of York, UK.

Description:

This session invites papers that examine any aspect of medieval cognition, neurology, and/or psychiatry through medieval source material. This topic can be approached through any one or combination of disciplines, and novel combinations of disciplines are encoraged. Especially welcome are papers that consider the relationships between modern medicine and medieval source material, such as the benefits and/or inherent problems of retrospective diagnosis and the value of the study of medieval history for our medical understanding today.

The session also encourages papers that explore terminology for diseases and disorders both modern and premodern, the diagnosis of conditions involving the brain, and the impact of neurological/psychiatric diseases and disorders on medieval lives.

Send abstracts of no more than 250 words, or any questions about this session, to Deborah.thorpe@york.ac.uk

 

See the CFP on Deborah’s Thorpe blog “The scribe Unbound”.

CFP – 10th Anniversary Annual Meeting – Disease, Disability & Medicine in Medieval Europe

Disease, Disability & Medicine in Medieval Europe
10th Anniversary Annual Meeting, Swansea University 2-4 December 2016 at the National Waterfront Museum, Swansea

Disability and Religion

This three-day conference forms the tenth workshop in the D&D series and aims to explore the interactions between disability and medicine in the Middle Ages by bringing together established scholars and postgraduates, international discourses and theoretical approaches from across a wide range of the humanities and sciences.
Paper proposals are invited on, but certainly not limited to, the following topics:

• Medieval disability and the ‘religious model’ of disability
• Disability and charity
• Medieval theological concepts of disability
• Canon law and disability
• Interstices of law and medicine in the Middle Ages
• Religion versus science/medicine?
• Devotion, piety and religiosity and voluntary disability
• Disability as form of religious expression
• Corporality and disembodied disability
• Disability between confliciting notions of physical and spiritual health
• Disability and the afterlife

Please submit a 300 word abstract for a 20 to 30 minute paper, together with a brief biography, to I.V.Metzler@swansea.ac.uk by 1 October 2016. If you have any queries please contact Dr Irina Metzler at the same email address.
Attendance at the conference will be free to all participants but numbers are limited to 50 attendees.
Accessibility information: The conference will take place on the first floor of the National Waterfront Museum, Swansea, which has wheelchair accessible lifts. The lecture theatres are wheelchair accessible and special dietary requirements can be catered for.

Download the CFP in .pdf