Call for papers – Messy Bodies: An Interdisciplinary Approach to the Body in Pre-Modern Culture – ICMS – May 9-12, 2019

Messy Bodies: An Interdisciplinary Approach to the Body in Pre-Modern Culture.

Call for papers
54th ICMS | May 9-12, 2019

Following our end-of-the-year symposium, the Medieval and Renaissance Graduate Interdisciplinary Network welcomes papers for our two sessions on Messy Bodies: An Interdisciplinary Approach to the Body in Pre-Modern Culture.

Messy bodies are all of our bodies. Once we take a good look at them, it becomes clear that the instantly legible body is nothing more than a construct. Bodies resist categorization, they push against their own boundaries, they complicate our understanding of medieval and Renaissance subjectivity and individuality; ultimately, they show how we—modern scholars—still need to consider what constitutes the often radicalized or gendered body. They remind us that no “body” may be taken as a given, requiring (even while confounding) construction in discourse, images, and other media.
On the one hand, we are particularly interested in the ways in which the psychological, emotional, and sensorial potentials of the human body express themselves semiotically and semantically. On the other, we want to explore what constitutes human or non-human bodies, following discussions on materiality, animal studies, and critical theory.
We envision our double session as a forum for discussion that engages with premodern bodies as physical and symbolic entities that both stand for and disrupt prescriptive discourses on bodily and social functions, including sexuality, and political participation. Following our mission to foster collaboration across disciplines, we welcome submissions from all fields, from any and all areas of the globe.

Submissions may focus on topics including, but not limited, to:

  • humoral and medical theories and practices queer and trans* bodies
    critical race theory
  • disability studies
  • object-bodies and objectified-bodies
  • post-humanisms (including considerations of ontology, networks, animal studies, and cybernetics)
  • pre-, early-, and post-modern theories of embodiment, subjectivity, and agency
  • violence to the body
  • dynamics of mind, body, and soul
  • modern responses to pre-modern bodies (in film, art, literature)

Please submit a 200-word abstract with a short bio (.pdf or .docx preferred) to nyumargin@gmail.com with “Kalamazoo submission” in the subject line, by September 15. Questions can also be addressed to the same e-mail. Abstracts not accepted to our sessions will be forwarded to the IMCS for consideration in general sessions.

Kalamazoo 2019 – Sponsored Session on disability

Contagions: Society for Historic Infectious Disease Studies(2): Interdisciplinary Approaches to Historic Disease I–II

Contact: Michelle Ziegler – 2720 Stratford Lane; Granite City, IL 62040

Phone: 618-420-3304

Email: miziegl@siue.edu

__________________________________________________________

Taiwan Association of Classical, Medieval, and Renaissance Studies (TACMRS)(1): Disease, Disaster, Disruption, and the Apocalyptic Imagination

Contact: Carolyn Scott – National Cheng Kung Univ. Dept. of Foreign Languages and Literature 1 University Rd.Tainan 701 Taiwan

Phone: +11886983710126

Email: cscott@mail.ncku.edu.tw

__________________________________________________________

Háskóli Íslands; Icelandic Research Fund (2): Disability before Disability in the Medieval Icelandic Sagas I–II

Contact: Ármann Jakobsson – Univ. of Iceland Árnagarður Reykjavik 101 Iceland

Phone: +3545254719

Email: armannja@hi.is

__________________________________________________________

Society for the Study of Disability in the Middle Ages(3): Medieval Disability and Pedagogy (A Roundtable); Intersections of Race and Disability in the Global Middle Ages; Medieval Disability and Public Scholarship

Contact: Tory Pearman

Email: pearmatv@miamioh.edu

__________________________________________________________

Univ. of South Carolina–Aiken(1): Disability and the Religious Body

Contact: Kyle Joseph Williams

Phone: 770-378-5610

Email: kylew@usca.edu

Sessions on Disability in the Middle Ages at ICMS Kalamazoo – 10/13 may 2018

Sessions on Disability in the Middle Ages at ICMS Kalamazoo

10/13 may 2018

 

Thursday 10 am

33 – BERNHARD 204
Medicine and Magic I: Healing Bodies
Sponsor: Societas Magica
Organizer: Marla Segol, Univ. at Buffalo
Presider: David Porreca, Univ. of Waterloo
1. Eating Words: Medical Charms as Healing Relics in Medieval England
Katherine Hindley, Nanyang Technological Univ.
2. Magical Plants in the Healing Arts
Helga Ruppe, Western Univ.
3. Occult Diagnosis: Physiognomy and the Medical Academy
Kira L. Robison, Univ. of Tennessee–Chattanooga

 

Thursday 1:30 pm

80 – BERNHARD 204
Medicine and Magic II: Healing Souls
Sponsor: Societas Magica
Organizer: Marla Segol, Univ. at Buffalo
Presider: Phillip A. Bernhardt-House, Skagit Valley College–Whidbey Island
1. Healing-Place for the Soul: Magic and Medicine in the Ancient Egyptian Library
Mark Roblee, Univ. of Massachusetts–Amherst
2. Embryologies: Medical and Ritual
Marla Segol
3. A Thirteenth-Century Version of the Almandal : Newly Discovered and Described for the First Time
Vajra Regan, Univ. of Toronto

 

Thursday 3:30

 

117 – SCHNEIDER 1255
A Science of the Human: Medical Discourse as a Way of Knowing
Sponsor: Italians and Italianists at Kalamazoo
Organizer: Matteo Pace, Columbia Univ.
Presider: Matteo Pace
1. Human Nature in, instead of beyond, Nature: A Reading of the Philosophical
Implications of the Commedia ’s Embryology
Humberto Ballesteros, Columbia Univ.
2. Dante and Medieval Medicine: Charting Connections between the Commedia and His Other Works
Paola Ureni, College of Staten Island and Graduate Center, CUNY
3. Petrarca and Botany: A Discourse on Healing
Theresa Holler, Univ. Bern
——————-
Friday, May 11 – 8:30 a.m.
East Ballroom, Bernhard Center
“Salvation is Medicine” – The Medieval Production and Gendered Erasures of
Therapeutic Knowledge
By Sara Ritchey (Univ. of Tennessee–Knoxville)
Sponsored by the Medieval Academy of America

 

Friday 10 am

211 – BERNHARD BROWN & GOLD ROOM
Medical Texts in Manuscript Culture
Sponsor: Medieval Academy of America
Organizer: Monica H. Green, Arizona State Univ.; Sara Ritchey, Univ. of
Tennesee–Knoxville
Presider: Monica H. Green
1. How to Read Bodies: Medicine, Mary, and Miracles in an Anglo-Norman Manuscript
Winston Black, Assumption College
2. Palliative Care for Life with Bodleian Library, Canonici Misc. 74
Amy V. Ogden, Univ. of Virginia
3. Healing through Words: Amulets, Formulae, and Spells in Medieval Hebrew Manuscripts on Women’s Health Care
Carmen Caballero Navas, Univ. de Granada

 

212 – SANGREN 1320
Vulnerability in the Middle Ages
Organizer: Hollis Shaul, Princeton Univ.
Presider: Elise Wang, Duke Univ.
1. The Wounded Knight-Healer: Corporeal Communities in the Old French Lancelot Grail
Mae Lyons-Penner, Stanford Univ.
2. Bodies before the Law: Ordeal and Legal Vulnerability in Medieval Iberia
Rachel Q. Welsh, New York Univ.
3. Peasant Perspectives on Protection and Vulnerability
Abigail Sargent, Princeton Univ.
4. Voices of the Vulnerable: Persuasion and Power in Robert Henryson’s Moral Fables
Emily Mahan, Univ. of Notre Dame

 

Friday – 1:30 PM

241 – SCHNEIDER 1220
Inclusion and Exclusion in the Middle Ages I
Sponsor: Program in Medieval Studies, Princeton Univ.
Organizer: Helmut Reimitz, Princeton Univ.
Presider: William Chester Jordan, Princeton Univ.
1. Urban Violence: Riot Culture and Dynamics in Late Antique Eastern
David A. Heayn, Graduate Center, CUNY
2. Christians under Islamic Rule: The Benefits of Collaboration and Inclusion
Chris Prejean, Univ. of California–Los Angeles
3. Inclusivity and Exclusivity in the Transmission of Poetic Knowledge in Early
Medieval Japan
Malgorzata Citko, Univ. of Hawaii–Manoa
4. At the Crossroads of Kingship and Disability: The Case of Baldwin IV of Jerusalem
Samantha Summers, Queen’s Univ. Kingston

 

267 – BERNHARD 212
Medicine in Cities: Public Health and Medical Professions
Sponsor: Medica: The Society for the Study of Healing in the Middle Ages
Organizer: William H. York, Portland State Univ.
Presider: William H. York
1. Minds in the Gutter: Plague, Sin, and Blame in Late Medieval Valencia
Abigail Agresta, Queen’s Univ. Kingston
2. Leprosy and Society in Medieval Bologna, 1100–1350
Courtney A. Krolikoski, McGill Univ.
3. “Per Modum Radicis”: Cultural Webs between Physicians and Poets in Duecento Bologna
Matteo Pace, Columbia Univ.
4. Pharmacy and Health Care in Late Byzantine Constantinople
Petros Bouras-Vallianatos, King’s College London

 

274 – SANGREN 1740
Tenth Anniversary Roundtable: Medieval Disability Studies, Then and Now (A Roundtable)
Sponsor: Society for the Study of Disability in the Middle Ages
Organizer: Joshua Eyler, Rice Univ.
Presider: Cameron Hunt McNabb, Southeastern Univ.
1. Survival
Christopher Baswell, Barnard College
2. Assessing the State of Medieval Disability Studies (by Editing a Scholarly Collection)
Kisha G. Tracy, Fitchburg State Univ.; John P. Sexton, Bridgewater State Univ.
3. Medieval Disability, or, What We Would Call Disability Today
Leah Pope Parker, Univ. of Wisconsin–Madison
4. Where There Were Few, Now There Are Many: The Future of Medieval Disability Studies?
Wendy J. Turner, Augusta Univ.
5. From Saint to Supercrip: Tracing the Inspiration Narrative from the Middle Ages to Modernity
Jessica Chace, New York Univ.
6. The Terms We Use
Joshua Eyler
7. Medieval Disability Studies: Looking Forward, Looking Back
Tory V. Pearman, Miami Univ. Hamilton

 

Friday 3:30 pm

 

330 – SANGREN 1740
Invisible Disabilities
Sponsor: Society for the Study of Disability in the Middle Ages
Organizer: Joshua Eyler, Rice Univ.
Presider: Joshua Eyler
1. Disabling Pride in the Pricke of Conscience
Michael Calabrese, California State Univ.–Los Angeles
2. Invisible and Intermittent: Markedness, Loss of Mind, and Communities in Later Medieval Miracle Stories
Leigh Ann Craig, Virginia Commonwealth Univ.
3. Deafness: Invisibility as Feignability, Silence as Affirmation
Julie Singer, Washington Univ. in St. Louis

 

324 – BERNHARD 212
Military Medicine: Wounds and Disease in Warfare
Sponsor: Medica: The Society for the Study of Healing in the Middle Ages
Organizer: William H. York, Portland State Univ.
Presider: Linda M. Keyser, Medica
1. Early Use of Medical Triage in the Saga of Saint Olaf
Theodore Cunningham, School of Medicine, Western Michigan Univ.
2. Controversial Wound Treatment by Three Medieval Surgeons: Hugh of Lucca,
Theodoric of Cervia, and Henry of Mondeville
Leigh Whaley, Acadia Univ.
3. Plague and the Great Company of 1361
Nicole Archambeau, Colorado State Univ.

 

Saturday 1:30

 

399 – VALLEY 2 GARNEAU LOUNGE
Corruption of Manly Men in Late Medieval England
Sponsor: Medieval Association of the Midwest (MAM)
Organizer: Matthew O’Donnell, Indiana Univ.–Bloomington
Presider: Matthew O’Donnell
1. “He shall nat be hole longe afftir”: Disabling Gawain in Le Morte Darthur
Kristin Bovaird-Abbo, Univ. of Northern Colorado
2. “Swiche Werk”: Performing Masculinity in Sir Orfeo
Walter Wadiak, Lafayette College
3. What Do Men Really Want? Desire in Sir Gawain and the Green Knight
Mickey Sweeney, Dominican Univ.

CFP – Representations of the Body in Saga Literature – ICMS Kzoo 2018

Representations of the Body in Saga Literature

For ICMS at Western Michigan University – Kalamazoo, MI – May 10-13, 2018

The New England Saga Society is delighted to once again offer a panel for those interested in Old Norse literature, history, and culture. We are currently seeking proposals for our sponsored session, “Representations of the Body in Saga Literature,” a panel that will explore the ways in which bodies and corporeality are constructed and represented in saga literature.

The body is an object upon which culture writes itself. It is the site of definition and re-definition as it witnesses history, moves through time and space, and is shaped by social, political, and cultural phenomena. Understanding how medieval audiences viewed the body and participated in the social construction of the body as object is essential to a better appreciation of medieval ideations of the human condition. We are interested in cultural, ideological, and literary investigations of the experience of embodiment in medieval Scandinavia and the representation of this experience in literature, art, philosophy, ethics, law, theology, and science.

Topics could include, but are not limited to:

body-mind dichotomy
ideological constructions of the body
ableness and disability
the monstrous
gender and sexuality
illness, death, and dismemberment
body-soul dichotomy
pagan vs. Christian bodies
queer theory
medicine
medical transformations of the body
body as landscape
images of bodies

Brief (200-300 word) proposals are welcome anytime before September 15, 2017. Please e-mail abstracts to either of the organizers:

Andrew Pfrenger (apfrenge@kent.edu)

John P. Sexton (john.sexton@bridgew.edu)

CFP – The Old and the Young: Medieval Bodies Ignored – ICMS Kalamazoo 2018

The Old and the Young:
Medieval Bodies Ignored

Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Sponsored Sessions at Kalamazoo, May 1043 2018

These sessions will concentrate upon the experiences and bodies of the old and the young, Recognising that the medieval normative body (male,
middle aged and white) has influenced the way we look at the MA, the intention of these sessions is to highlight the experiences of children and the elderly which are outside the boundaries of said norm. Furthermore, we wish to gain a greater understanding of how other factors (gender, race, ability, wealth, bodily status, power) intersect with and impact upon the experiences of elderly and young people. While medieval childhood studies is by no means a neglected field, historiography has recently turned away from a ‘panhistorical and essentialist’ child-centric model. This allows us to examine the experiences of a child within culturally specific contexts in which it might be neglected, abandoned or dismissed. Meanwhile, the old are often marginalised in scholarship, within the medieval discourse and in our lived reality. The hope is that by examining their experiences in concert with one another, we will be able to build up a clearer understanding of the lived experience of the old and the young in the Middle Ages.

Intersectional, interdisciplinary abstracts would be particularly welcomed.
Possible Topics Include:
‘ Specific historical experiences of being young and old
‘ Body as physical entity and as a site of rhetoric
‘ Dual nature of body: site of discourse and identity
‘ Descriptions of old and young bodies

Please submit a 250-word proposal for a 15- to 20-minute paper as well as a Participant Information Form to medievalbodiesignored@gmail.com by September 15, 2017.