CFP – Religious and/or Medicinal definitions of Otherness – IMC

Religious and/or Medicinal definitions of Otherness,

IMC Leeds 2017

Religion and medicine were in many ways intertwined in the Middle Ages, both in explaining deviance, illness and impairment as well as in the healing practices. They are not anymore seen as competing but rather as supporting, even complementing each other.  Both religion and medicine had their own ways of defining the undesirable, which could lead to the construction of ‘The Other’ – be it disability, mental disorder, or heterodoxy. Some features, like lunacy, leprosy, impotence, or infertility were in the nexus of both religious and medicinal explanations. Both religion and medicine could also offer methods for cure and ways to integrate the deviant persons back into a community. The interconnection of both concepts can be found, for example, in hagiography, sermons, medical treatises and herbals. These sessions aim to analyse healing as cultural practice; the focal questions are how religious and medicinal explanation intermingled in the construction of ‘the Other’ and in what ways they complemented or competed in explaining, categorizing and treating different spiritual, mental and bodily conditions.

We aim at organizing a double session focusing on following questions:

  • Role of medicine and/or religion in constructing the Other
  • Role of medicine and/or religion in experiences of the patient
  • Religion and medicine – rivalling, complementing or symbiotic?
  • Treating the patient, curing the ailment – integration or permanent marginalization?
  • Faith healing and placebo – synonyms, interconnection, anachronisms?

We encourage proposals sensitive to temporal and/or geographical changes focusing on various cultural levels and social contexts. Those interested in presenting a paper in this panel, please submit an abstract of roughly 250-300 words to the organisers by 23 September 2016.

Contacts:
Jenni Kuuliala jenni.kuuliala@uta.fi
Sari Katajala-Peltomaa sari.katajala-peltomaa@uta.fi
Trivium, Tampere Centre for Classical, Medieval, and Early Modern Studies

Call for Papers – ‘For I am a woman, ignorant, weak and frail’: Feminising Death, Disability and Disease in the later Middle Ages – IMC Leeds

‘For I am a woman, ignorant, weak and frail’: Feminising Death, Disability and Disease in the later Middle Ages

International Medieval Congress University of Leeds 3rd – 6th July 2017

Conference Details

The International Medieval Congress is the largest interdisciplinary medieval conference of its kind – attracting over 2,200 attendees from over 50 countries, and boasting approximately 1,700 individual papers within 580 academic sessions. Every year, the IMC chooses a special thematic strand which, for 2017, is ‘Otherness’. This focus has been chosen for its wide application across all centuries and regions and its impact on all disciplines devoted to this epoch. For further information on the Congress, see: http://www.leeds.ac.uk/ims/imc/imc2017_call.html 

Session Details

**Should this session attract enough interest it will become a three-part series, with each session focussing more deeply on the individual themes of death, disability and disease. Within late-medieval society, to be valued was to look and behave according to the societal ‘norm’ – dependency was largely represented as a feminine trait, whereas to be independent was to be masculine. How then did medieval people respond to deviations from these gendered expectations as a result of death (or dying), disabilities and chronic diseases? This session will consider the feminisation of death, disability and disease through an interdisciplinary lens, in order to answer questions about the perceived ‘feminine’ dependency of the marginal ‘third state’ between being fully healthy and fully sick (i.e. to be dying, diseased or disabled). It will hope to consider the contradictory nature of female disease and disability which both engendered an elevated sense of holiness and, conversely, a sense of physical monstrosity; the female response to death, disability and disease as elements of daily life which were (largely) out of their control; the effect of death, disability and disease on medieval constructions of masculinity; and whether – if death, disease and disability dehumanise the body – is it even important to consider the effect of these states on an individual’s gendered identity? We welcome multi-disciplinary papers from all geographical locations, c.1300-c.1500, which engage with themes such as (but not limited to): representations of death, disease and/or (dis)ability; literature either for or by women dealing with the themes of death, disease and/or disability; the tradition of Memento Mori and/or the Danse Macabre; the gendering of ‘Death’ ; the Black Death’s impact on traditional gender roles; obstetric death; female piety and holy anorexia; the effect of chronic disease and/or disability on late-medieval constructions of masculinity; women and disease (as the developers of cures, writers of recipes, carers or patients, etc.); female use of disability aids and/or prosthetics; and self-inflicted disfigurement.

Submission Guidelines

Please send a paper title and an abstract of 100-200 words to Rachael Gillibrand at the Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds (hy11rg@leeds.ac.uk) by 23rd September 2016.

CFP – Leeds 2017 – Leprosy and Power

Leeds IMC 2017 – Leprosy and Power

As next year’s IMC theme of ‘Otherness’ lends itself perfectly to the topic of medieval leprosy, I would like to propose a session on the subject of Leprosy and Power, following on from this year’s successful sessions about Leprosy and Identity. In this session, I would like to explore the various ways in which lepers interacted with medieval authorities – how authorities may have attempted to control the behaviour of lepers in their community, how lepers related to those in power, and how they fitted into a social hierarchy.

Possible topics could include:

· Leprosy and the elite

· Municipal authority and common law

· Canon law and the church

· The power of leprosy in society

· Lepers and social status – before / after diagnosis

Proposals should include a title, abstract (approximately 100 words), and institutional affiliation.

Please submit paper proposals by email to Katie Phillips, University of Reading – k.phillips@pgr.reading.ac.uk – by Friday 9th September.

Via Katie Phillips on Academia

CFP – Leeds 2017 – Pilgrimage: restoring physical, mental and spiritual health

Call for Papers: IMC Leeds 2017

Pilgrimage: Restoring Physical, Mental, and Spiritual Health

Sponsored by the Graduate Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Reading.
The thematic strand for the next International Medieval Congress (3-6 July 2017) at University of Leeds is Otherness. We invite you to submit proposals for 20-minute papers to take part in one or more sessions on the theme of pilgrimage as a restorative process between physical, mental, and spiritual sickness and health. We are particularly interested in papers that address identifications of pilgrims as “others” who were undertaking a unique physical and spiritual journey. Relevant topics include but are not limited to:
• Miraculous healing.

• Penitential pilgrimage.

• Proxy pilgrimage.

• Pilgrimage journeys.

• Experiences of pilgrims at shrines.

• Relics and saintly intercession.

• Monastic and lay interactions with the cult of saints.

If you would like to take part in these sessions, please send an abstract of no more than 200 words as well as a short bio to claire.trenery.2008@live.rhul.ac.uk by Friday 16 September 2016.

Organisers Ruth Salter (University of Reading, ) & Claire Treneryand (Royal Holloway, University of London, )

CFP – Leeds 2017 – Health and Medicine in the Early Medieval West

Call for papers – Health and Medicine in the Early Medieval West – IMC Leeds 2017

We are inviting papers for sessions at IMC Leeds 2017 on Health and Medicine in the Early Medieval West. Despite important new work, early medieval medicine still remains quarantined from the mainstream of early medieval historiography. The aim of these sessions is to diagnose and treat this historiographical “otherness” by bringing health and medicine into conversation with other areas of early medieval historiography, and by using health and medicine as ways of exploring early medieval societies.

Papers on post-Roman, pre-university medicine and/or health from c.500-c.1000 are welcomed on any of the following themes:

a) Situating medical texts and traditions

Possible topics: what counts (and counted) as a medical text/tradition in the early middle ages; continuation of, adaptation of or deviation from medical traditions; manuscript contexts of medical texts; authors and audiences; social, political and/or intellectual contexts of medical learning.

b) Medical ideas outside medical texts

Possible topics: migration of ideas within or outside medical texts; bibliographical evidence (e.g. library catalogues) for medical learning; medical learning and the laity; medical metaphors; health and medicine in pastoral rhetoric; liturgy as medicinal.

c) Moving beyond texts

Possible topics: interdisciplinary approaches to early medieval health; use of aDNA, palaeopathology and bioarchaeology; material culture of health; comparative history.

d) Humans and other animals

Possible topics: animal products in medical practice; health implications of interactions between humans and animals; analogies between human and animal medicine; veterinary medicine.

If interested, please send your details, paper title and an informal abstract to Zubin Mistry (zubin.mistry@ed.ac.uk) and Claire Burridge (cpsb2@cam.ac.uk) by Friday 9th September. Please get in touch if you have any questions and please do pass on the CFP to anyone who may be interested.