New books – A Cultural History of Disability (6 volumes), ed. by David Bolt, Robert McRuer – Bloomsbury publ.

About A Cultural History of Disability

How has our understanding and treatment of disability evolved in Western culture? How has it been represented and perceived in different social and cultural conditions?

In a work that spans 2,500 years, these ambitious questions are addressed by over 50 experts, each contributing their overview of a theme applied to a period in history. The volumes describe different kinds of physical and mental disabilities, their representations and receptions, and what impact they have had on society and everyday life.

Individual volume editors ensure the cohesion of the whole, and to make it as easy as possible to use, chapter titles are identical across each of the volumes. This gives the choice of reading about a specific period in one of the volumes, or following a theme across history by reading the relevant chapter in each of the six.

The six volumes cover1. – Antiquity (500 BCE – 500 CE); 2. – Middle Ages (500 – 1450); 3. – Renaissance (1400 – 1650) ; 4. – Long Eighteenth Century (1650 – 1800); 5. – Long Nineteenth Century (1800 – 1920); 6. – Modern Age (1920 – 2000+).

Themes (and chapter titles) are: atypical bodies; mobility impairment; chronic pain and illness; blindness; deafness; speech; learning difficulties; mental health.

The page extent is approximately 2,000pp with c. 200 illustrations. Each volume opens with Notes on Contributors, a series preface and an introduction, and concludes with Notes, Bibliography and an Index.

Table of contents

Volume 1: A Cultural History of Disability in Antiquity, edited by Christian Laes (University of Manchester, UK)
Volume 2: A Cultural History of Disability in the Middle Ages, edited by Jonathan Hsy (George Washington University, USA), Tory V. Pearman (Miami University, Hamilton, Ohio, USA) and Joshua R. Eyler (Rice University, USA)
Volume 3: A Cultural History of Disability in the Renaissance, edited by Susan Anderson (Sheffield Hallam University, UK) and Liam Haydon (United Kingdom Research and Innovation, UK)
Volume 4: A Cultural History of Disability in the Long Eighteenth Century, edited by D. Christopher Gabbard (University of North Florida, USA) and Susannah B. Mintz (Skidmore College, USA)
Volume 5: A Cultural History of Disability in the Long Nineteenth Century, edited by Joyce Huff (Ball State University, USA) and Martha Stoddard Holmes (California State University San Marcos, USA)
Volume 6: A Cultural History of Disability in the Modern Age, edited by David T. Mitchell (George Washington University, USA) and Sharon L. Snyder (George Washington University, USA)

More infos on the editor’s website

CFP – Leeds IMC 2020 – ‘Minority and Marginalised Experiences’, organised by An Australasian Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies

 

Recent scholarship has begun to acknowledge that the focus of Medieval and Early Modern Studies has long been on the elite, male, western European experience. New movements in academia are addressing this imbalance, acknowledging that women, ethnic minorities, and other marginalised groups contributed richly to the fabric of medieval and early modern life. Ceræ aims to join this shift in focus to the experiences of minority groups, marginalised peoples, and life in non-western territories with a conference session at IMC Leeds 2020.

Topics may include but are not limited to:

  • Experiences of minority or marginalised groups
  • Writings by minority or marginalised groups
  • Literary depictions of minority or marginalised groups
  • The effacement of minority or marginalised groups
  • Marginalia
  • Experiences on the transition of a border or landscape
  • The law of minority and marginalised groups
  • Minority and marginalised cultures, beliefs, and celebrations
  • Experiences of disability and physical and mental illness

Ceræ invites submissions encompassing all aspects of the late classical, medieval, and early modern world. There are no geographical restrictions. As an interdisciplinary journal, Ceræ encourages submissions across the fields of archaeology, art history, historical ecology, literature, linguistics,  intellectual history, musicology, politics, social studies, and beyond.

Abstracts of 250 words should be sent to editorcerae@gmail.com by 1st September 2019.

Attendees are responsible for all fees and costs associated with attending the IMC, and for registering for the congress.

For further enquiries contact our Editor: editorcerae@gmail.com; or get in touch via Facebook (facebook.com/CeraeJournal) or Twitter (@CeraeJournal).

CFP – Experiences of Dis/ability from the Late Middle Ages to the Mid-Twentieth Century 22 – 23 August 2019, Tampere University, Finland

Keynote speakers: David Lederer, Maynooth University; Donna Trembinski, St. Francis Xavier University; David Turner, Swansea University

In recent decades, dis/ability history has become an important field in its own right, standing at the crossroads of the social history of medicine, the history of minorities and the history of everyday life. Conceptions of and attitudes to physical and mental wellbeing and to difference are and have always been key elements in any human society, while the lived experience of dis/ability has varied across societies and time periods, but also depending on the person’s socioeconomic status, age, gender, and the nature of the impairment. Experiences of disability, whether personal or communal, have long continuities in the past, but they have also changed dramatically with the development of medical science and institutionalized care.

This conference aims to concentrate on the experiences of those with physical or mental impairments and chronic illnesses, with special reference to the period between the late Middle Ages and the mid-twentieth century. We understand dis/ability in a broad sense, covering a wide range of physical, mental and intellectual impairments and chronic illnesses. How, then, were various dis/abilities lived and experienced, how did communities shape these experiences, and what similarities and changes can we detect over the course of time? An important viewpoint is also that of methodology: how can a modern scholar approach the experience of those living in the past?

We thus invite papers that explore the ways in which ‘disabilities’ have been lived and experienced, in all stages of life, and by people of different social status and background. The conference aims to promote dialogue between disability historians across national and chronological borders and we welcome papers presenting new research and work in progress.

Possible topics include, but are not limited to:

  • How to approach the experience of dis/ability (sources, methodology)?
  • Different categories of dis/ability experience, or what counts as experience of disability?
  • How have society, religion and practices of care and cure defined the experience of disability?
  • Lived religion and dis/ability
  • Medicalization, institutionalization and everyday life
  • The impact of gender, age and social status on the experience of dis/ability
  • Lived welfare and everyday experiences of people with disabilities, e.g. living at home, in a workhouse or mental institution, the impact of various welfare systems.

To submit a proposal, please send title and abstract of 200 words, with your contact information and affiliation by February 15, 2019, at https://www.lyyti.in/disabilityexperience2019_callforpapers

Conference website: https://events.uta.fi/disabilityexperience2019/

Participation is free of charge, and includes lunches and coffees for speakers.

The conference is organized by the Academy of Finland Centre of Excellence in the History of Experiences (HEX, https://research.uta.fi/hex/) at the University of Tampere and the group “Lived Religion” and has received funding from The Jenny and Antti Wihuri Foundation (https://wihurinrahasto.fi/?lang=en) and HEX. For more information, please write to the organizers (jenni.kuuliala@uta.fi and riikka.miettinen@uta.fi)

New book – New Approaches to Disease, Disability and Medicine in Medieval Europe, eds. Erin Connelly and Stefanie Künzel (Archeopress, October 2018)

The majority of papers in this volume were originally presented at the eighth annual ‘Disease, Disability, and Medicine in Medieval Europe’ conference. The conference focused on infections, chronic illness, and the impact of infectious diseases on medieval society, including infection as a disability in the case of visible conditions, such as infected wounds, leprosy, syphilis, and tuberculosis. Using an interdisciplinary approach, this conference emphasised the importance of collaborative projects, novel avenues of research for treating infectious disease, and the value of considering medieval questions from the perspective of multiple disciplines. This volume aims to carry forward this interdisciplinary synergy by bringing together contributors from a variety of disciplines and from a diverse range of international institutions. Of note is the academic stage of the contributors in this volume. All the contributors were PhD candidates at the time of the conference, and the majority have completed or are in the final stages of completing their programmes at the time of this publication. The originality and calibre of research presented by these early career researchers demonstrates the promising future of the field, as well as the continued relevance of medieval studies for a wide range of disciplines and topics.

CONTENTS:

Foreword — Christina Lee

Introduction — Erin Connelly and Stefanie Künzel

Þu miht wiþ þam laþan ðe geond lond færð: Conceptualisations of Disease in Anglo-Saxon Charms — Stefanie Künzel

A Still Sound Mind: Personal Agency of Impaired People in Anglo-Saxon Care and Cure Narratives — Marit Ronen

Mobility Limitations and Assistive Aids in the Merovingian Burial Record — Cathrin Hähn

Tearing the Face in Grief and Rape: Cheek Rending in Medieval Iberia, c. 1000–1300 — Rachel Welsh

Clerical Leprosy and the Ecclesiastical Office: Dis/Ability and Canon Law — Ninon Dubourg

Inside the Leprosarium: Illness in the Daily Life of 14th Century Barcelona — Clara Jáuregui

Languages of Experience: Translating Medicine in MS Laud Misc — Lucy Barnhouse

Heillög Bein, Brotin Bein: Manifestations of Disease in Medieval Iceland — Cecilia Collins

A Case Study of Plantago in the Treatment of Infected Wounds in the Middle English Translation of Bernard of Gordon’s Lilium medicinae — Erin Connelly

Miserum spectaculum, horrendus fetor, aspectus horrendus: ‘Syphilis’ in Strasbourg at the Turn of the 16th Century — Christoph Wieselhuber

More infos on the editor website !

CFP – “Gender and ‘Aliens'” – Gender and Medieval Studies Conference 2019

“Gender and ‘Aliens'” –

Gender and Medieval Studies Conference 2019

 

In recent years discourse around ‘aliens’, as migrants living in modern nation-states, has been highly polarised, and the status of people who are technically termed legal or illegal aliens by the governments of those states has often been hotly contested. It is evident from studies of the past, however, that the movement of people is not a recent phenomenon: in the medieval west, one of the Latin terms applied to such people was alieni (‘foreigners’, or ‘strangers’), and it is clear from the surviving evidence that there were many people in the Middle Ages who could be, and indeed were, identified as aliens. This conference aims to stimulate debate about the ways in which gender intersected with and related to the idea of such aliens – and, more broadly, alienation – in the medieval world. Social, political and religious attitudes to aliens and the alienated were not constant over the centuries from c. 400 to c. 1500, and nor were they uniform across the whole world. Some foreigners, as aliens, might end up integrated into the societies they entered; others might find themselves marginalised, lonely or alone; or oppressed, as outlaws, outcasts, or slaves. Gender might exacerbate or mitigate this, depending on time, place and context. Authors or artists depicting parts of the world far from and alien to their own often filled them with people or beings not like them, demonstrating the imaginative power of alterity, while the reactions of those who encountered people from distant places and observed or participated in their customs could include recognition of similarity as well as difference. Foreigners were also not the only people who might find themselves alienated from, or within, certain societies or cultures: the medieval world included many marginalised groups. The issues of aliens and alienation may be differently construed in the modern world, but they are certainly not new. The relationship of gender to these topics is complex, variable and significant.

The conference aims to enable discussion of these issues as they relate to the whole medieval world from c. 400 to c. 1500. The organisers welcome proposals for papers on any topic related to gender and aliens or alienation, broadly construed, and encourage submissions relating to the world beyond Europe. Papers might consider issues such as:

* refugees, immigrants, emigrants

* inclusion and exclusion

* alterity and difference

* outlaws, the law, legality

* marginalised or disenfranchised groups

* non-normative bodies, illness, disability

* acculturation

* imagined geographies

* borders and frontiers

* ethnicity and identity

* slavery and slaves

In addition to sessions of papers, the conference will also include a poster session. Proposals for a 20-minute paper or for a poster can be submitted at https://tinyurl.com/gms2019submit by September 30th 2018. The conference organisers are also happy to consider proposals for other kinds of presentation: please contact the organisers at gmsconference2019@gmail.com to discuss these. Some travel bursaries will be available for students and unwaged delegates to attend this conference: please see http://medievalgender.co.uk/ for details.

Rechercher dans OpenEdition Search

Vous allez être redirigé vers OpenEdition Search