CFP – Remembering Communities and Others in Early Medieval Europe – IMC Leeds 2018

Remembering Communities and Others in Early Medieval Europe

 (Leeds 2-5 July 2018)

 

‘Hearing these complaints and others like them continually, I commemorate the past, in order that it may come to the knowledge of the future.’

Gregory of Tours, Preface to Decem libri historiarum

Following the success of the ‘Creating Communities and Others’ sessions at the IMC 2017, we seek to continue our investigations of these concepts within the context of the special thematic strand of the IMC 2018: ‘Memory’. As the organisers note, there are many kinds of memory, which permeate the writing of history, for modern scholars as much as our medieval predecessors. In these sessions, we seek to examine how memory can be put to use as a tool for creating or perpetuating ideas of community and otherness.

The purpose of these sessions is to investigate the use of memory in the construction and dissemination of notions of community and otherness in early medieval Europe. Both communities and Others could exist on a variety of levels, from the community of a monastery to the community of a kingdom, or from a group of heretics to non-Christian peoples in lands near or far. But what were the histories behind such groups? What were their origin stories, and how were these used? Why were some members of the community remembered, while others were forgotten? How were contemporary communities and Others connected to imagined distant places and times? How were the historical relationships between different groups remembered? What particular factors contributed to memories of community and otherness, and how were these altered or retained during the Early Middle Ages?

We hope to bring together papers that address these and related questions in order to examine the cultures of early medieval Europe as seen through the ways in which inhabitants of the region understood their place in the wider world. Paper proposals are welcome from all disciplines, including history, art history, archaeology, literary studies and manuscript studies.

Possible topics and themes may include but are not limited to:

  • Continuity and change in writing about communities and Others
  • The impact of political events on memories of community and Otherness
  • Shared histories for networks of communities
  • Memories from the peripheries
  • Class, Community and Otherness
  • Gender, Community and Otherness
  • Religion, Community and Otherness
  • Memories of relations between the West and the Byzantine and Muslim worlds
  • Uses of material culture in the remembrance of communities and Others

After the IMC, we hope to publish the contributions to these sessions as a volume of collected essays through our sponsor Kısmet Press.

Please send abstracts of no more than 300 words to Ricky Broome (rickybroome@hotmail.com) by 3 September 2017.

 

More info on this website.

CFP – International Medieval Society – Evil

EVIL

ims-paris

Paris, 29 June- 1 July 2017

For its 14th Annual Symposium, the International Medieval Society invites abstracts on the theme of Evil in the Middle Ages. The concept of evil, and the tensions it reveals about the relationship between internal and external identities, fits well into recent trends in scholarship that have focused attention on medieval bodies, boundaries, and otherness. Medieval bodies frequently blur the distinctions between moral and non-moral evil. External, monstrous appearances are often seen as testament to internal dispositions, and illnesses might be seen as a reflection of a person’s evil nature. More generally, evil may stand in for an entire, contrasting ideological viewpoint, as much as for a particular kind of behaviour, action, or being. It may appear in the world through intentional acts, as well as through accidental occurrences, through demonic intervention as much as through human weakness and sin. It may be rooted in anger, spread through violence, or thrive on ignorance, emerging from either the natural world or from mankind.

Alongside those working on bodies and monstrosity, the question of evil has also preoccupied scholars working to understand the limits of moral responsibility and the links between destiny and decision as shown in medieval literary, artistic and historical productions. The 14th Annual IMS Symposium on Evil aims to focus on the many facets of medieval evil, analysing the intersections between evil as concept and form, as well as taking into account medieval responses to evil and its potential effects.

This Symposium will thus explore (but is not limited to) three broad themes:

1)    Concepts of evil: discourse on morality and moral understandings of evil; reflections on the relationship between good and evil; heresy and heretical beliefs, teachings, writings; evil and sin; evil and conscience; associations with hell, the devil; types of evil behaviour or evil thoughts; categories of evil; evil as disorder/chaos; evil as corruption; evil and mankind

2)    Embodied evil/being evil/evil beings: monstrosity; the demonic; perceptions of deformity and disfigurement; evil transformations and metamorphoses; magic and the supernatural; outward expressions of evil (e.g. through clothing, material possessions); evil objects

3)    Responses to evil: punishments; the purging and/or exorcism of evil; inquisition; evil speech; warnings about evil (textual, visual, musical); ways to avoid evil or to protect oneself (talismans etc.); the temptation of evil; emotional responses to evil; social exclusion as a response to evil.

Through these broad themes, we aim to encourage the participation of researchers with varying backgrounds and fields of expertise: historians, art historians, musicologists, philologists, literary specialists, and specialists in the auxiliary sciences (palaeographers, epigraphists, codicologists, numismatists). While we focus on medieval France, compelling submissions focused on other geographical areas that also fit the conference theme are welcome and encouraged. By bringing together a wide variety of papers that both survey and explore this field, the IMS Symposium intends to bring a fresh perspective to the notion of evil in medieval culture.

Proposals of no more than 300 words (in English or French) for a 20-minute paper should be e-mailed to communications.ims.paris@gmail.com by November 5th 2016. Each should be accompanied by full contact information, a CV, and a list of the audio-visual equipment that you require.

Please be aware that the IMS-Paris submissions review process is highly competitive and is carried out on a strictly anonymous basis. The selection committee will email applicants in late November to notify them of its decision. Titles of accepted papers will be made available on the IMS-Paris website. Authors of accepted papers will be responsible for their own travel costs and conference registration fee (35 euros, reduced for students, free for IMS-Paris members).

The IMS-Paris is an interdisciplinary, bilingual (French/English) organisation that fosters exchanges between French and foreign scholars. For the past ten years, the IMS has served as a centre for medievalists who travel to France to conduct research, work, or study.

For more information about the IMS-Paris and past symposia programmes, please visit our website: www.ims-paris.org.

IMS-Paris Graduate Student Prize:
The IMS-Paris is pleased to offer one prize for the best paper proposal by a graduate student. Applications should consist of:
1) a symposium paper abstract
2) an outline of a current research project (PhD. dissertation research)
3) the names and contact information of two academic referees

The prize-winner will be selected by the board and a committee of honorary members, and will be notified upon acceptance to the Symposium. An award of 350 euros to support international travel/accommodation (within France, 150 euros) will be paid at the Symposium.