CFPs on disability for the International Congress on Medieval Studies – Kalamazoo (and online) 2022

Medieval Sermon Studies I: Disease, Health, and Sermons

Contact Person: Jessalynn Bird ; jbird@saintmarys.edu

Principal Sponsoring Organization: International Medieval Sermon Studies Society

This session explores the rhetoric, metaphors, and physical realities of spiritual, mental, and physical illness in the medieval period in pastoral literature and sermons. Discourse between pastoralia and other genres is encouraged (liturgy, hagiography, miracle stories, vernacular literature, hospital records and medical treatises).

Deadline for New Submissions: Wednesday, September 15, 2021
 
 
_______________________
 
 
 

Of Pestilences and Plagues: Sickness in the Medieval Court

Contact Person: Shawn Cooper

Principal Sponsoring Organization: International Courtly Literature Society (ICLS), North American Branch

The International Courtly Literature Society (North American Branch) invites paper proposals for a sponsored session: Of Pestilences and Plagues: Sickness in the Medieval Court. We welcome submissions addressing the depiction of illness in courtly literatures, chronicles, histories, and other artistic media. Comparative readings of medieval and modern depictions of sickness in the setting of the medieval court are also welcome. Presenters will receive a year’s membership in the ICLS-NAB, and may be eligible for presentation-related grants and awards of the society.

Deadline for New Submissions: Wednesday, September 15, 2021
 
 
_____________
 
 
 

Trauma, Disability, and the Anchorhold

Contact Person: Michelle Sauer

Principal Sponsoring Organization: International Anchoritic Society

Trauma studies and work that links studies of disability and trauma finds ample representation in the texts and contexts of anchorites, and their frequent citation of Christ’s wounds and the valorization of sickness, pain, and distress in the anchorhold. For this panel, we are seeking papers that interrogate the role and use of trauma and its attendant concerns—witnessing, wounds, pain—in the study of anchorites, their texts, and the responses to both. Papers are welcome that touch on the material realities of these figures and their receptions, or which concentrate on the figurative significance of trauma.

Deadline for New Submissions: Wednesday, September 15, 2021.
 
 
___________________
 
 
 

The “New Paradigm” of Plague Studies: Expanded Geographies and Chronologies of the Medieval Pandemics

Contact Person: William York

Principal Sponsoring Organization: Medica: The Society for the Study of Healing in the Middle Ages

In 2014, Monica Green wrote “the field of historical plague studies … must be redefined in three dimensions: its geographic extent, its chronological extent, and the methodological registers we use to investigate it.” Since then, work on the full extent of both the 1st and 2nd Plague Pandemics has continued as Green anticipated, now encompassing the Mongol Empire (and perhaps the Xiongnu before them) and extending, perhaps, into sub-Saharan Africa. Whereas prior scholarship focused on the Mediterranean and Europe, pandemic studies must necessarily cast a wider net. This panel invites presentations of the latest work in the field.

Deadline for New Submissions: Wednesday, September 15, 2021.
 
 
__________
 
 

The Globalization of Medieval Medicine: Ideas, Authorities, and Products 1000-1600

Contact Person: William York

Principal Sponsoring Organization: Medica: The Society for the Study of Healing in the Middle Ages

This panel explores the globalization of medieval medicine, beginning in the eleventh century via the Silk Road and continuing through the early modern era of exploration and discovery. It will look at how medieval European medical practice and theory changed due to the influx of new ideas, practices, and pharmaceutical products. Panelists will also consider how medical consumerism and the transmission of ideas were affected by economic, religious, cultural, political, and technological changes, such as the advent of printed medical texts and the popularization of medical authorities outside of the ancient canon.

Deadline for New Submissions: Wednesday, September 15, 2021.
 
 
_________________
 
 

Age in Monastic Life

Contact Person: Amelia Kennedy ; amelia.kennedy@uni-graz.at

From child oblates to venerable seniors, age plays a crucial role in monastic life. Yet it is easy to overlook mentions of age in historical sources as merely recording objective facts. This panel explores age as a socially constructed category within the monastery, asking how “age” was calculated, asserted, and negotiated. We invite proposals for 15-20-minute papers analyzing concepts of age and the life-cycle in medieval monasticism: How did monastic authors understand the aging process? How were relationships among different generations governed? What are the relationships between age and gender, authority, disability, or spirituality?

Deadline for New Submissions: Wednesday, September 15, 2021
 
 
__________________
 
 

From Farm to Sick Bed: Food, Illness, and Medicine in the Medieval West

Contact Person: John Bollweg ; admin@mensetmensa.org

Principal Sponsoring Organization: Mens et Mensa: Society for the Study of Food in the Middle Ages

From epidemics traced to so-called “wet markets” dealing in food and medicine to the pursuit of longevity through the “Mediterranean Diet” — foods, diet, and regional foodways to be presented as both a cause and cure of illness. For this session, we seek papers on any examples (historical, literary, natural philosophical, religious, etc.), from Europe or the Mediterranean basin, in the years 500 C.E. through 1600 C.E., of food or drink as either the creator or the corrector of diseases physical or moral, individual or communal. This session continues the theme of a Fall 2021 conference.

Deadline for New Submissions: Wednesday, September 15, 2021
 
 
____________
 
 

Disability, Disease, and Health: New Voices, New Directions

Contact Person: Leah Parker

Principal Sponsoring Organization: Society for the Study of Disability in the Middle Ages

Paper proposals on any topic relating to disability, disease, and/or health will be welcomed, on any period between c. 500–1500 and on any geographical area. Topics might include, but are not limited to: lived experiences of impairment, medicine, healing, stigma, pandemic, contagion, textual or visual representations of bodily difference, archaeological evidence of impairment, theological/political/social attitudes toward disability, the body in law, etc. Presenters may be emerging in terms of their career (e.g., graduate students or early career researchers) or emerging by bringing their research into a new direction (i.e., newly engaging with the study of disability, disease, and/or health).

Deadline for New Submissions: Wednesday, September 15, 2021
 
 
_______________________
 
 

Medicine and Health Care in Medieval Iberia

Contact Person: Elisa Manzo

Principal Sponsoring Organization: Association of Graduate and Early Career Scholars of Medieval Iberia (AGECSMIberia)

Studies on premodern medicine have had a remarkable increase in the last decades and the recent global pandemic has done no more than further increase this trend. This session invites contributions on medicine and health care in Medieval Iberia from graduate and early career scholars, coming from a range of backgrounds and working on different aspects of this field. Potential topics may include: continuity or disruption in the medical practice between Roman and Post-Roman Iberia, regulations to safeguard physicians and patients, Jewish medicine in Christian and Arabic milieus, women healers’ status, the social effects of the so-called “medical pluralism”.

Deadline for New Submissions: Wednesday, September 15, 2021
 
 
_________________
 
 

Medicine in the Global Middle Ages

Contact Person: Meg Oldman ; oldman@tarleton.edu

Principal Sponsoring Organization: Medieval Makars Society

After a year, the world is beginning to see an end to the COVID-19 pandemic. Throughout it all, we have heard various ways to cope with or test our resilience against the novel coronavirus, from logical public health recommendations such as mask wearing and hand washing to abstract suggestions like injecting bleach and holding our breaths for 10 seconds. Suggestions such as these are nothing new. Prior to public health initiatives we know today, folklore was an important method of transmission for medical knowledge. We are looking for papers that explore global transmissions of medical knowledge through folkloric methods.

Deadline for New Submissions: Wednesday, September 15, 2021
 

Conférence – Claire Billen et Marc Boone, “Gouverner en temps de pandémie — Une vision historique” – en ligne – 11 Mars 2021

   

Nous avons le plaisir de vous inviter le jeudi 11 mars de 13h à 14h30 au webinaire organisé par la Fondation Universitaire sur « Gouverner en temps de pandémie – Une vision historique » avec les professeurs Claire BILLEN (ULB) et Marc BOONE (UGent), suite à la publication« BANS ET ÉDITS POUR LA VILLE DE TOURNAI EN TEMPS DE PESTE (1349-1351). Les transcriptions retrouvées de Frédéric Hennebert » (Commission Royale pour l’histoire, Bruxelles 2021) (en voie de publication).

Depuis un an, nous sommes complètement immergés dans la pandémie de COVID-19. Une expérience complètement nouvelle pour chacun d’entre nous – y compris le gouvernement. Mais tout au long de l’histoire, l’humanité a été confrontée à des pandémies à de nombreuses reprises. Comment les gens ont-ils réagi à cela dans le passé ? Sur base de manuscrits récemment découverts, les professeurs Claire BILLEN (ULB) et Marc BOONE (UGent) ont étudié le comportement du magistrat de la ville de Tournai lors de l’épidémie de peste au 14ème siècle.

La découverte, parmi les manuscrits de la Bibliothèque de l’Université de Gand, de transcriptions effectuées par Frédéric Hennebert (1800-1857), archiviste de la ville de Tournai, a permis de reconstituer les 30 premières pages du premier Registre aux publications du magistrat urbain, concernant les années 1349-1351. Ce document, disparu dans le bombardement de Tournai en 1940, informe sur les règlementations presque quotidiennes ayant régi la ville, face à une crise multiforme, dominée par l’irruption de la Peste Noire à l’été 1349. Les modalités de la réponse donnée par nos ancêtres médiévaux à la pandémie illustrent le fonctionnement d’une société urbaine, confrontée brutalement à une mortalité hors normes. Avant la redécouverte des transcriptions de Hennebert, l’impact de la Peste Noire sur la ville de Tournai n’était connu que par les écrits d’un témoin direct, l’abbé Gilles Li Muisis, à la tête de l’abbaye bénédictine de Saint-Martin. Les ordonnances urbaines bénéficient de cet éclairage mais complètent également cette description unilatérale.

S’il est téméraire d’établir un parallèle entre l’irruption d’une épidémie inédite au XIVe siècle et l’arrivée inattendue du Covid-19 en Europe, début 2020, certaines réflexions comparatives sont néanmoins possibles. Elles touchent, entre autres, les aspects politiques. La situation sanitaire, loin d’affaiblir le gouvernement urbain de Tournai en 1349, lui a permis, au contraire, de se déployer, d’investir des domaines qui n’étaient pas directement de son ressort. Toutes choses égales par ailleurs, c’est bien un phénomène de cet ordre que nous observons aujourd’hui. Les contestations politiques et juridiques, agitant en ce moment les populations européennes, adversaires des contraintes multiples qui leur sont imposées, appellent une mise en perspective.

Langues utilisées : F et N.

La participation est gratuite, mais il est nécessaire de s’inscrire. Détails via ce lien . Quelques jours avant l’activité, vous recevrez le lien pour vous connecter.

 S’inscrire par le Formulaire d’inscription

N’hésitez pas à diffuser cette invitation à vos collègues ou aux autres intéressés par ce sujet.

New book – Plague Image and Imagination from Medieval to Modern Times – ed. by Lynteris, Christos – Palgrave Macmillan

Presents a history of plague, bringing together scholars from early modern and modern history as well as anthropologists working on plague in historical and contemporary contexts

Examines the visual record of the plague and explores the relationship between the epidemic image and human imagination

Integrates geographical perspectives beyond the usual Eurocentric plague frame, appealing to scholars of global history and colonialism

This edited collection brings together new research by world-leading historians and anthropologists to examine the interaction between images of plague in different temporal and spatial contexts, and the imagination of the disease from the Middle Ages to today. The chapters in this book illuminate to what extent the image of plague has not simply reflected, but also impacted the way in which the disease is experienced in different historical periods. The book asks what is the contribution of the entanglement between epidemic image and imagination to the persistence of plague as a category of human suffering across so many centuries, in spite of profound shifts in our medical understanding of the disease. What is it that makes plague such a visually charismatic subject? And why is the medical, religious and lay imagination of plague so consistently determined by the visual register? In answering these questions, this volume takes the study of plague images beyond its usual, art-historical framework, so as to examine them and their relation to the imagination of plague from medical, historical, visual anthropological, and postcolonial perspectives.

More info on the editor website

Podcast – The Sick to Death Podcast – A history of medicine in ten objects

The Sick to Death Podcast – A history of medicine in ten objects on display at the brand-new medical museum in the heart of the historic city of Chester. To find out more, visit www.sicktodeath.org.

  • Industrial Revolution

    In the seventh episode of our brand-new podcast series, historian and host Rebecca Rideal is joined by Sick to Death’s very own Dean Paton, as well as experts Dr Deborah Brunton, Julie Mathias, Stephen McGann, Dr David Turner and Dr Jaipreet Virdi. We’ll explore the ways in which the Industrial Revolution transformed public health, brought disability rights to the fore, and wreaked havoc on urban health. Today’s object is a model of smoke damaged lungs.Written and produced by Rebecca Rideal.Edited and produced by Peter Curry. The podcast is brought to you by Sick to Death, an exciting new medical museum in the heart of historic Chester.heme music: “Time” by The Broxton Hundred.

  • The Vaccine

    In the sixth episode of our brand-new podcast series, historian and host Rebecca Rideal is joined by Sick to Death’s very own Dean Paton, as well as experts Elise Mitchell, Owen Gower, Professor Kate Williams and Dr Lindsey Fitzharris. Focusing on smallpox, we tell the fascinating story of vaccinations. Today’s ‘object’ is St Michael’s Church, Chester.Written and produced by Rebecca Rideal.Edited and produced by Peter Curry.Theme music: “Time” by The Broxton HundredThe podcast is brought to you by Sick to Death, an exciting new medical museum in the heart of historic Chester.

  • The Global Exchange of Medicine and Disease

    In the fifth episode of our brand-new podcast series, historian and host Rebecca Rideal is joined by Sick to Death’s very own Dean Paton, as well as experts Elise Mitchell, Dr James Brown, Dr Kim Walker, Professor Manuel Barcia Paz and Dr Rohan Deb Roy to investigate how medicine and disease traveled around the globe. Focusing on the transatlantic slave trade and the story of malaria and quinine, we’ll shine a light on medicine during early modern globalization. Today’s objects are tea and coffee.Written and produced by Rebecca Rideal.Edited and produced by Peter Curry.Theme music: “Time” by The Broxton HundredThe podcast is brought to you by Sick to Death, an exciting new medical museum in the heart of historic Chester.*Warning: this episode contains content some listeners might find disturbing*

  • Early Modern Medicine

    In the fourth episode of our brand-new podcast series, historian and host Rebecca Rideal is joined by Sick to Death’s very own Dean Paton, as well as experts Julie Mathias, Dr Lara Thorpe, Dr Wanda Wyporska, Luke Pepera and Dr Anton Howes to investigate medicine during the early modern period. Forget the Tudors, the big story during this time is the movement of medical thinking away from Galen. Today’s object is a life-size replica of Andreas Vesalius’s Hanging Man.Written and produced by Rebecca Rideal.Edited and produced by Matt Pearson.Theme music: “Time” by The Broxton HundredThe podcast is brought to you by Sick to Death, an exciting new medical museum in the heart of historic Chester.

  • The Black Death

    In the third episode of our brand-new podcast series, historian and host Rebecca Rideal is joined by Sick to Death’s very own Dean Paton, as well as experts Dr Janina Ramirez, Professor Michael Wood, Dr Eleanor Janega, Dr Emma Wells and Shafi Musaddique to investigate the history of the Black Death – from medicine and religion to trade and culture.  Today’s object is a pomander, used to ward of miasma…Written and produced by Rebecca Rideal.Edited and produced by Peter Curry.Theme music: “Time” by The Broxton HundredThe podcast is brought to you by Sick to Death, an exciting new medical museum in the heart of historic Chester.

  • Medieval Medicine

    In the second episode of our brand-new podcast series, historian and host Rebecca Rideal is joined by Sick to Death’s very own Dean Paton, as well as experts Dr Janina Ramirez, Professor Michael Wood, Dr Eleanor Janega and Shafi Musaddique to explore the history of medicine during the medieval period. Today’s object is the skeleton of a medieval nun. Written and produced by Rebecca Rideal.Edited and produced by Peter Curry.Theme music: “Time” by The Broxton Hundred.

  • The Ancient World

    In the first episode of our brand-new podcast series, historian and host Rebecca Rideal is joined by Sick to Death’s very own Dean Paton, as well as experts Dr Matt Pope, Dr Jay Crisostomo, Dr Sushma Jansari and Dr Naoise Mac Sweeney to explore the history of medicine during the prehistoric and the ancient world. Today’s object is a replica Roman medical kit, complete with votive eyes, knives and specula. Enjoy!Written and produced by Rebecca Rideal.Edited and produced by Peter Curry.Theme music: “Time” by The Broxton Hundred.

Link for the podcast here

Transcript of the episode here.

New book – Cécile Chapelain De Seréville-Niel, Christine Delaplace, Damien Jeanne et Pierre Sineux, “Purifier, soigner ou guérir ? Maladies et lieux religieux de la Méditerranée antique à la Normandie médiévale”, Rennes, Presses universitaires de Rennes, 2020.

Cet ouvrage permet une première synthèse sur l’empreinte des phénomènes religieux dans le traitement des maladies au sein des sociétés antiques et médiévales. Les investigations récentes menées pour la Normandie médiévale, mais aussi les études s’appuyant sur une aire géographique large (de la Grèce au monde anglo-normand) du VIIIe siècle av. J.-C. au XIIIe siècle apr. J.-C. ont permis d’aboutir à des réflexions croisées sur les problématiques suivantes : les sanctuaires de guérison participent-ils à la construction socioreligieuse du territoire ? Le religieux est-il indissociable du médical ? Quelle est la part de la magie dans les pratiques médicales ? La diffusion des savoirs médicaux éclipse-t-elle le religieux ?

Sommaire

  • Entre punition et élection : les maladies sont-elles sacrées ?
  • Thérapeutes et mortifères : dieux saints et roi
  • Typologie, typographie et fonctions des lieux religieux
  • Savoirs médicaux, rites, pratiques de guérison, purification, exorcisme

Auteurs

Cécile Chapelain de Seréville-Niel est archéoanthropologue et ingénieure de recherche en archéologie au CNRS. Elle est responsable du Service d’archéoanthropologie du Centre Michel-de-Boüard-CRAHAM (Centre de recherches archéologiques et historiques antiques et édiévales) UMR 6273 du CNRS – université de Caen-Normandie.

Christine Delaplace est professeur d’histoire romaine à l’université de Caen-Normandie. Elle dirige depuis 2017 le centre Michel-de-Boüard-CRAHAM.

Damien Jeanne est docteur en histoire et archéologie des mondes médiévaux et est membre associé au centre Michel-de-Boüard-CRAHAM.

Pierre Sineux (†) était professeur d’histoire grecque et membre du centre Michel-de-Boüard-CRAHAM. Il a été président de l’université de Caen-Normandie de 2012 à 2016.