New publication – Coming soon : “Living with Disfigurement in Early Medieval Europe” by Patricia Skinner

51704299

Living with Disfigurement in Early Medieval Europe

by Patricia Skinner

This book examines social and medical responses to the disfigured face in early medieval Europe, arguing that the study of head and facial injuries can offer a new contribution to the history of early medieval medicine and culture, as well as exploring the language of violence and social interactions. Despite the prevalence of warfare and conflict in early medieval society, and a veritable industry of medieval historians studying it, there has in fact been very little attention paid to the subject of head wounds and facial damage in the course of war and/or punitive justice. The impact of acquired disfigurement —for the individual, and for her or his family and community—is barely registered, and only recently has there been any attempt to explore the question of how damaged tissue and bone might be treated medically or surgically. In the wake of new work on disability and the emotions in the medieval period, this study documents how acquired disfigurement is recorded across different geographical and chronological contexts in the period.

About the author: Patricia Skinner is Research Professor in Arts and Humanities at Swansea University, UK. She is the Director of the Effaced from History project, sponsored by the Wellcome Trust, and has previously published books on gender, medicine, and health, in addition to the social history of southern Italy.

Review (on the ditor website): “In this uncommonly refreshing contribution to the vibrant historical discourse on marginalisation, Skinner engages with current concerns beyond her chronological and thematic focus, while eschewing anachronism and reductionism. With ample evidence and spirited argument, she challenges widespread generalisations about past attitudes—and exposes persistent prejudices—towards the physically different.” (Luke Demaitre, Visiting Professor, Center for Biomedical Ethics and Humanities, University of Virginia, and author of “Leprosy in Premodern Medicine: A Malady of the Whole Body”)

Table of contents

 

  • Introduction: Writing and Reading About Medieval Disfigurement

  • The Face, Honor and “Face”

  • Disfigurement, Authority and the Law

  • Stigma and Disfigurement: Putting on a Brave Face?

  • Defacing Women: The Gendering of Disfigurement

 

 

More infos on the editor’s website

 

New Publication – Journal – Textual Practice Volume 30, 2016 – Issue 7: Prosthesis in Medieval and Early Modern Culture

 

Textual Practice

Volume 30, 2016

Issue 7: Prosthesis in Medieval and Early Modern Culture

Foreword [abstract]

Prosthesis, n.

  1. Grammar. The addition of a letter or syllable to the beginning of a word. […] 1553 T. Wilson Arte of Rhetorique iii. f. 94, Prosthesis. Of Addition. As thus. ‘He did all to berattle hym. Wherein appereth that a sillable is added to this vorde’ (rattle) […]

  2. a. The replacement of defective or absent parts of the body by artificial substitutes […] 1706 Phillips’s New World of Words […] In Surgery Prosthesis is taken for that which fills up what is wanting, as is to be seen in fistulous and hollow Ulcers, filled up with Flesh by that Art: Also the making of artificial Legs and Arms, when the natural ones are lost.

    (OED, s. v. ‘prosthesis’)

If we go back far enough, we find that the first acts of civilization were the use of tools […]. With every tool man is perfecting his own organs, whether motor or sensory, or is removing the limits to their functioning […]. By means of spectacles he corrects defects in the lens of his own eye […]. Writing was in its origin the voice of an absent person […]. Man has, as it were, become a kind of prosthetic God. When he puts on all his auxiliary organs he is truly magnificent; but those organs have not grown on to him and they still give him much trouble at times.11. Sigmund Freud, Civilization and Its Discontents, trans. Joan Riviere (London: The Hogarth Press, 1963), pp. 27–9.

(Sigmund Freud, Civilization and Its Discontents)

A rhetorical ‘addition’ to a pre-existing ‘beginning’, a ‘replacement’ for that which is ‘defective or absent’, a technological, aesthetic mode of ‘correction’ that reveals a history of corporeal and psychic discontent: definitions and accounts of prosthesis turn repeatedly on the absences signalled by these ‘auxiliary organs’. Figured in prosthetic terms, the study of pre-modern prosthesis registers as an absence to which contemporary critical discourse gestures. In his seminal, cross-period study, Prosthesis, David Wills locates the Reformation as a moment of prosthetic ‘reformation’ that creates the technological, rhetorical and philosophical conditions for one type of beginning for prosthesis, marked also by the appearance of the word in Thomas Wilson’s 1553 text The Arte of Rhetorique.22. David Wills, Prosthesis (Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 1995), pp. 219–20.View all notes And yet, as Freud’s allusion to ‘the first tools of civilization’ as prostheses suggests, this figure has a much deeper, further reaching history. This special issue brings together scholars working on medieval and early modern literature and culture in order to reconsider that history and its implications for contemporary critical responses to prosthesis.Recent scholarship across a number of disciplines has given weight to the term ‘prosthesis’ as a tool of analysis with a variety of applications: it can characterise the act of literary and cultural criticism, or the effects of literature and the reading process, and it provides a means to articulate histories and experiences of disability.

3. For example, Wills, Prosthesis; David T. Mitchell and Sharon L. Snyder, Narrative Prosthesis: Disability and the Dependencies of Discourse (Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 2000); Marquard Smith and Joanne Morra (eds.), The Prosthetic Impulse: From a Posthuman Present to a Biocultural Future (Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2006). Prosthesis is productive for literary and disability studies in particular because it invites us to explore the intersection between language and material, embodied and imagined worlds. These explorations, however, often consider prosthesis from the perspective of (technological, rhetorical and philosophical) conditions – heart transplants, bionic limbs, the novel, cyborgs, the virtual reality of a digital age – understood to be unavailable to the pre-modern. Essays in this volume seek to redress this imbalance in our critical discourse by examining prosthesis in its pre-modern contexts and showing that the significance of this figure for medieval and early modern writers extends far beyond its reach as a grammatical term.44. More work still needs to be done on the history of the word ‘prosthesis’. We are grateful to Rick Godden for bringing to our attention the forthcoming contribution to this history by Brandon Hawk, ‘Prosthesis: From Grammar to Medicine in the Earliest History of the Word’. We ask how medieval and early modern examples can challenge our assumptions about what prosthesis is and does. Can we consider prosthesis as ‘process’, always acting, always becoming? What literary, linguistic, technological or performative practices constitute prosthetic action? How do prostheses act on and orient or construct bodies, selves and communities? Does prosthesis heal, protect, reconstruct and connect, or does it expose corporeal vulnerability and the limits of language and embodied experience? How, in turn, do medieval and early modern representations of prosthesis shape or challenge assumptions about normative bodies and bodily integrity? Does pre-modern prosthesis, in all its iterations, figure sameness or difference? Asking these questions in historical context, we show that medieval and early modern prosthesis offers to speak to – and maybe even re-assemble – our present-day discourse on this subject.

Content

Foreword, Chloe Porter, Katie L. Walter & Margaret Healy, Pages: 1205-1207

Prosthesis and reformation: the Black Rubric and the reinvention of kneeling, Isabel Davis, Pages: 1209-1231

Wearing powerful words and objects: healing prosthetics, Margaret Healy, Pages: 1233-1251

Literary genre, medieval studies, and the prosthesis of disability, Julie Orlemanski, Pages: 1253-1272

Prosthetic ecologies: vulnerable bodies and the dismodern subject in Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Richard H. Godden, Pages: 1273-1290

Prosthetic encounter and queer intersubjectivity in The Merchant of Venice, Allison P. Hobgood, Pages: 1291-1308

‘Happy, and without a name’: prosthetic identities on the early modern stage, Naomi Baker, Pages: 1309-1326

Prosthesis and the performance of beginnings in The Woman in the Moon, Chloe Porter, Pages: 1327-1344

Fragments for a medieval theory of prosthesis, Katie L. Walter, Pages: 1345-1363

 

Find more info and all articles on the journal’s website

19è rendez-vous de l’Histoire de Blois – Table Ronde 2016-10-06, 14h30 à 16h – L’histoire du handicap

Cartes blanches Table Ronde

2016-10-06, 14h30 – 16h Conseil départemental, Salle Kléber-Loustau

L’histoire du handicap

 

Cette table ronde vise à débattre des avancées historiographiques dans le champ de l’histoire du handicap. Plusieurs historiens spécialistes du handicap identifieront les apports des recherches effectuées pendant les décennies précédentes, les tendances de la recherche actuelle, et les chantiers de recherche à ouvrir.

Modérateurs

Gildas BREGAIN

Docteur en histoire, post-Doctorant IRIS/EHESS

 

Intervenants

Christophe CAPUANO

Maître de conférences en histoire contemporaine à l’université de Lyon

Mariama KABA

Docteure en histoire, responsable de recherche à l’Institut universitaire d’histoire de la médecine et de la santé publique à Lausanne

Caroline HUSQUIN

Agrégée d’histoire, doctorante en histoire romaine, ATER à l’Université de Bretagne-Sud

Plus d’informations ici

CFP – VariAbilities III – The Same Only Different? – University of London – 6 & 7th June 2017

Call For Papers – VariAbilities III:

The Same Only Different?

Senate House, University of London (Malet Street, London, WC1E, England)

Tuesday and Wednesday 6 & 7th June 2017

In the third iteration of the Variabilities Series, we will take stock of the academic work done on the “body” in “history”.

When we study the “Body” should we restrict ourselves to impaired bodies or make comparisons with sports bodies? Or should a conference discussing the body entertain papers on both impaired and sports bodies?

When we consider “history” we must ask ourselves when did history begin, and has it ended? Variabilities III is casting its nets as widely as possible, with no methodological assumptions, beginning or end dates, with as wide scope for dialogue as possible.

Come and tell us what the “body” in “history” means to you.

Organiser announce that Prof. Miriam Wallace of New College Florida will be the keynote at Variabilities III: “The Spector of the Singular Body in Frankenstein (1818): Difference and Constructed Community”.

For accessibility purposes we welcome Skype Presentations

Please send your proposal (300 words) by November 30th 2016 [extended dealine th january 2017] to

chris.mounsey@winchester.ac.uk

and stan.booth@winchester.ac.uk

 

More information here on the UCLA website !

and on the event website !

News ! – Amsterdam University Press launch a new Serie: “Premodern health, disease, and disability”

Amsterdam University Press –

Serie “Premodern health, disease, and disability”

Commissioning Editor: Simon Forde and Tyler Cloherty

Editors: Wendy J. Turner, Georgia Regents University
Walton O. Schalick III, University of Wisconsin, Madison
Christina Lee, University of Nottingham
and a wider Advisory Board of scholars from universities at Bremen, Exeter, Chapel Hill, and elsewhere

Geographical scope: Global

Chronological scope: Premodern is most often defined as pre-French Revolution or about 1800

Keywords: Ancient health, Medieval health, Early Modern health, disease, disability, hospitals, medicine, public health, leeches.

Description : This series is timely as the fields of premodern health and disability studies have grown rapidly in the last decade. To date, there is no series concentrating on early medicine, disabilities, or health generally (see related series below). The series would cover all topics concerned with health, disease, and disability—including injury, impairment, medical care, physicians, and hospitals—before about 1800. The board would entertain material from all parts of the globe, but given our own contacts will encourage those studying Europe and the Mediterranean from antiquity to the end of the Early Modern period.

Proposals Welcome: The series welcomes scholarly monographs and edited volumes in English by both established and early-career researchers. The board would entertain material from all parts of the globe, but given their own contacts will encourage those studying Europe and the Mediterranean from antiquity to the end of the Early Modern period.

Proposals should kindly follow the standard AUP Proposal format and should also include the envisaged table of contents or overview of the volume and abstracts of the proposed chapters or articles.

Further Information: For questions or to submit a proposal, contact Commissioning Editors European History Simon Forde (s.forde@aup.nl) and Tyler Cloherty (tcloherty@arc-humanities.org)

 

Find all the informations on the Amsterdam University Press website.

Rechercher dans OpenEdition Search

Vous allez être redirigé vers OpenEdition Search