CFP – IMCS Kalamazoo 2019 – The Society for the Study of Disability in the Middle Ages propose 3 themes: Medieval Disability and Pedagogy – Intersections of Race and Disability in the Global Middle Ages – Disability and Public Scholarship.

The Society for the Study of Disability in the Middle Ages Invites Proposals for the International Congress on Medieval StudiesMay 9-12 2019, Kalamazoo, MI

 

Medieval Disability and Pedagogy (a roundtable)

Contributors will discuss the ways in which disability has informed approaches to instruction, how to unite disability pedagogy and scholarship, possible texts for inclusion in the classroom, and selected assignments and activities that involve the medieval disability perspective. Participants will share practical ideas for effective activities, assignments, and readings.

 

Intersections of Race and Disability in the Global Middle Ages (a session of papers)

In this session, contributors will offer papers that explore the intersections between race and disability in the Middle Ages. We particularly seek approaches that consider non-Western, inter-disciplinary perspectives.

 

Disability and Public Scholarship (a session of papers)

In this session, participants will discuss the responsibilities of medieval disability studies to engage in public scholarship, how we can share our own public scholarship, and the ways that we as medieval disability studies scholars can be more active in public scholarship in order to support the value of our research.

Please send 250-word abstracts along with completed Participant Information Form to Tory Pearman at pearmatv@miamioh.edu by September 15.

Because medieval disability studies should pursue inclusive and intersectional scholarship, the SSDMA is committed to including perspectives representative of the diversity of the field and to amplifying voices that are too often marginalized by systemic discrimination in academic employment, publishing, funding, and conference programming

 

More infos on the organisator’s website !

Call for papers – Messy Bodies: An Interdisciplinary Approach to the Body in Pre-Modern Culture – ICMS – May 9-12, 2019

Messy Bodies: An Interdisciplinary Approach to the Body in Pre-Modern Culture.

Call for papers
54th ICMS | May 9-12, 2019

Following our end-of-the-year symposium, the Medieval and Renaissance Graduate Interdisciplinary Network welcomes papers for our two sessions on Messy Bodies: An Interdisciplinary Approach to the Body in Pre-Modern Culture.

Messy bodies are all of our bodies. Once we take a good look at them, it becomes clear that the instantly legible body is nothing more than a construct. Bodies resist categorization, they push against their own boundaries, they complicate our understanding of medieval and Renaissance subjectivity and individuality; ultimately, they show how we—modern scholars—still need to consider what constitutes the often radicalized or gendered body. They remind us that no “body” may be taken as a given, requiring (even while confounding) construction in discourse, images, and other media.
On the one hand, we are particularly interested in the ways in which the psychological, emotional, and sensorial potentials of the human body express themselves semiotically and semantically. On the other, we want to explore what constitutes human or non-human bodies, following discussions on materiality, animal studies, and critical theory.
We envision our double session as a forum for discussion that engages with premodern bodies as physical and symbolic entities that both stand for and disrupt prescriptive discourses on bodily and social functions, including sexuality, and political participation. Following our mission to foster collaboration across disciplines, we welcome submissions from all fields, from any and all areas of the globe.

Submissions may focus on topics including, but not limited, to:

  • humoral and medical theories and practices queer and trans* bodies
    critical race theory
  • disability studies
  • object-bodies and objectified-bodies
  • post-humanisms (including considerations of ontology, networks, animal studies, and cybernetics)
  • pre-, early-, and post-modern theories of embodiment, subjectivity, and agency
  • violence to the body
  • dynamics of mind, body, and soul
  • modern responses to pre-modern bodies (in film, art, literature)

Please submit a 200-word abstract with a short bio (.pdf or .docx preferred) to nyumargin@gmail.com with “Kalamazoo submission” in the subject line, by September 15. Questions can also be addressed to the same e-mail. Abstracts not accepted to our sessions will be forwarded to the IMCS for consideration in general sessions.

New book – Trauma in Medieval Society – by Wendy J. Turner and Christina Lee

Trauma in Medieval Society

Series: Explorations in Medieval Culture, Volume: 7

 

 

Submary from the editor website:

Trauma in Medieval Society is an edited collection of articles from a variety of scholars on the history of trauma and the traumatised in medieval Europe. Looking at trauma as a theoretical concept, as part of the literary and historical lives of medieval individuals and communities, this volume brings together scholars from the fields of archaeology, anthropology, history, literature, religion, and languages. The collection offers insights into the physical impairments from and psychological responses to injury, shock, war, or other violence—either corporeal or mental. From biographical to socio-cultural analyses, these articles examine skeletal and archival evidence as well as literary substantiation of trauma as lived experience in the Middle Ages.

Contributors are Carla L. Burrell, Sara M. Canavan, Susan L. Einbinder, Michael M. Emery, Bianca Frohne, Ronald J. Ganze, Helen Hickey, Sonja Kerth, Jenni Kuuliala, Christina Lee, Kate McGrath, Charles-Louis Morand Métivier, James C. Ohman, Walton O. Schalick, III, Sally Shockro, Patricia Skinner, Donna Trembinski, Wendy J. Turner, Belle S. Tuten, Anne Van Arsdall, and Marit van Cant.

More info on the editor website.

Disability in Latin Medieval Philosophy and Theology Disability in Latin Medieval Philosophy and Theology conference – April 26–28, 2018 – Notre Dame University

Disability in Latin Medieval Philosophy and Theology Disability in Latin Medieval Philosophy and Theology conference

April 26–28, 2018

McKenna Hall Notre Dame Conference Center

Programme :

Organizers:     Prof. Richard Cross (richard.cross@nd.edu)

Prof. Scott M. Williams (swillia8@unca.edu)

 

Thursday, April 26th, 2018

3:00-3:30pm    Coffee & Snacks

 

3:30-4:50pm  –  Kevin Timpe, “Thomas Aquinas on Disability” (Calvin College)

Chair: Christina van Dyke (Calvin College)

Commentator: Richard Cross (University of Notre Dame)

 

Friday, April 27th, 2018

8:15-9:00am    Breakfast & Coffee for All

 

9:00-10:20am  –  Gloria Frost, “Congenital Disabilities” (University of St. Thomas)  (via Skype)

Chair: Miguel Romero (Salve Regina University)

Commentator: Scott M. Williams (UNC Asheville)

 

10:35-11:55am  –  John Slotemaker, “Aquinas and Ockham on the Imago Dei and Intellectual Disabilities”

Chair: Mark K. Spencer (University of St. Thomas)

Commentator: Miguel Romero (Salve Regina University)

 

12-1:30pm    Lunch for all

 

1:30-2:50pm  –  Scott M. Williams, “Ableism, Medieval Concepts of Personhood, and Imago Dei Trinitatis

Chair: Richard Cross (University of Notre Dame)

Commentator: John Slotemaker (Fairfield University)

 

3:05-4:25pm  –  Miguel Romero, “Interpreting amentia in the Aristotelian-Thomistic Tradition: 16th Century Spanish Colonialism and the Disappearance of a Latin Medieval Account of Cognitive Impairment”

Chair: Thomas Ward (Baylor University)

Commentator: Mark K. Spencer (University of St. Thomas)

 

 

Saturday, April 28th, 2018

8:15-9:00am    Breakfast & Coffee for All

 

9:00-10:20am  –  Christina van Dyke, “Taking the ‘Dis’ out of Disability: Martyrs, Mystics, and Mothers in the Middle Ages” (Calvin College)

Chair: Kevin Timpe (Calvin College)

Commentator: Scott M. Williams (UNC Asheville)

 

10:35-11:55am  –  Mark K. Spencer, “Separated Souls: Disability in the Intermediate State”

Chair: Richard Cross (University of Notre Dame)

Commentator: Thomas Ward (Baylor University)

 

12-1:30pm    Lunch for all

 

1:30-2:50pm  –  Richard Cross, “Disabilities in Heaven”

Chair: Scott M. Williams (UNC Asheville)

Commentator: Christina van Dyke (Calvin College)

 

3:05-4:25pm – Thomas Ward, “Thomas Aquinas and Duns Scotus: Disabilities and the Beatific Vision”

Chair: John Slotemaker (Fairfield University)

Commentator: Kevin Timpe (Calvin College)

 

4:35-5:15 – Closing Panel Session with Conference Speakers

Chair: Scott M. Williams (UNC Asheville)

More infos on the university of Notre Dame website.

Meeting – ‘“Going to the Dogs?” A Workshop Series on Research at the Intersection of Disability and Animal Studies’ – 19 february 2018 – Leeds Centre for Medical Humanities

First meeting of ‘“Going to the Dogs?” A Workshop Series on Research at the Intersection of Disability and Animal Studies’.

On Monday 19 February 2018 from 2–5pm, Leeds Centre for Medical Humanities (based in the School of English, 6–10 Cavendish Road)

 

Responding to recent scholarship that has placed disability and animal studies in critical dialogue (see, for instance, Sunaura Taylor’s new book and the Canadian Journal of Disability Studies recent call for papers), this workshop will bring together three Leeds-based scholars, who will each approach the intersection of disability and animal studies from a different disciplinary and methodological perspective. The session will feature Karen Sayer, who is a Professor of Social and Cultural History at Leeds Trinity University; Sunny Harrison, who is a PhD candidate in the Institute for Medieval Studies at the University of Leeds; and Leah Burch, who is a PhD candidate in Sociology and Social Policy at the University of Leeds as well as a member of the Centre for Culture & Disability Studies at Liverpool Hope University. Respectively, their talks will cover the following topics:

Models of utility, disability, and occupational health in later medieval horse medicine.
The conceptualisation of disabled human labourers relative to conceptualisations of farm animals in nineteenth-century agriculture.
Instances of disability being animalised in contemporary hate speech.

Each talk will be followed by time for questions, and the workshop will end with a roundtable discussion about the ethical and methodological challenges of working on themes of disability and animals together. Tea and coffee will be provided.

Please note that there will be a follow-up artistic event (starring the disability artist Jenni-Juulia Wallinheimo-Heimonen) at The Tetley during the evening on Thursday 12 April 2018 and a second workshop (featuring Andy Flack, Justyna Włodarczyk, Neil Pemberton, and Rachael Gillibrand) on Friday 13 April 2018. More details regarding these events will follow.

If you have any questions or would like to book a place at the workshop in February—for FREE—please email the organiser, Dr Ryan Sweet, including details of anything that can be done to ensure that the event is accessible for you. Ryan’s email address is R.C.Sweet@leeds.ac.uk.