Sessions on Disability History – The 52nd International Congress on Medieval Studies – campus of Western Michigan University – May 11-14, 2017.

Sessions on Disability History – The 52nd International Congress on Medieval Studies – campus of Western Michigan University – May 11-14, 2017.

 

Friday, May 12 – Evening Events
Society for the Study of Disability in the Middle Ages
=> Valley II, LeFevre Lounge Business Meeting

 

Friday 10 AM

214 – BERNHARD 210

Landscape Approaches to the Plague

Sponsor: Contagions: Society for Historic Infectious Disease Studies
Organizer: Michelle Ziegler, Independent Scholar
Presider: Philip Slavin, Univ. of Kent
1. Michelle Ziegler – Plague in the Sixth-Century Bavarian Landscape
2. Carenza Lewis, Univ. of Lincoln – 44.7%: New archaeological Evidence for the Impact of the Black Death in
England and Its Implications for Future Research
3. Fabian Crespo, Univ. of Louisville – Heterogeneous Immunological Landscapes and Medieval Plague

 

Saturday 10 AM
345 – VALLEY III ELDRIDGE 309
Piers Plowman and Disability
Sponsor: International Piers Plowman Society
Organizer: Curtis Gruenler, Hope College
Presider: Curtis Gruenler
1. Dana Roders, Purdue Univ. – Intersections of Disability and Sin in Piers Plowman
2. Laura Godfrey, Univ. of Connecticut – Must I Here-Wel to Do-Wel? Sensory Impairments in Piers Plowman
3. Richard H. Godden, Loyola Univ. New Orleans – Dismodern Will

 

Saturday 10 AM
393 – BERNHARD BROWN & GOLD ROOM
Fair Unknowns (A Roundtable)
Sponsor: Arthuriana
Organizer: Dorsey Armstrong, Purdue Univ./Arthuriana
Presider: Dorsey Armstrong,
1. Joseph M. Sullivan, Univ. of Oklahoma – What’s So Interesting About Fair Unknown Romances in Germanic Arthurian Literatures?
2. Kevin J. Harty, La Salle Univ. – Rescued from the Archives: The Fair Unknown on CBS TV in 1951: Mr. I. Magina-tion’s “Sir Gareth, Knight of the Round Table”
3. Christopher A. Snyder, Mississippi State Univ. – Jay Gatsby as the Fair Unknown: Arthurian Resonances in Fitzgerald
4. Tory V. Pearman, Miami Univ. Hamilton – (Dis)abling the Fair Unknown: Disability and Gender in Malory’s “Alexander the Orphan”
5. Ryan Naughton, Arizona State Univ.  – Natural Nobility and Fair Unknowns

 

Saturday 10:30 PM
 436 – BERNHARD 158
Space, Place, and Disability (A Panel Discussion)
Sponsor: Society for the Study of Disability in the Middle Ages
Organizer: Joshua Eyler, Rice Univ.
Presider: Tory V. Pearman, Miami Univ. Hamilton
1. Julie Paulson, San Francisco State Univ. – “Fooles that Goon in Goddis Weys”: Mental Disability and Moral Personhood in Late Medieval Literature
2. Danielle Allor, Rutgers Univ.  – “Mobile as Wishes”: Disability, Intersubjectivity, and Community in the Liber confortatorius
3. Leah Pope, Univ. of Wisconsin–Madison – The Grave’s a Fine and Private Place: Death and the Embodied Anglo-Saxon Subject
4. Aleksandra Pfau, Hendrix College – Disability in the Village: Household Care in Late Medieval France

 

Sunday 8:30 AM
527 – BERNHARD 158
Medievalism and Disability (A Roundtable)
Sponsor: Society for the Study of Disability in the Middle Ages
Organizer: Joshua Eyler, Rice Univ.
Presider :John P. Sexton, Bridgewater State Univ.
1. Jess Genevieve Bailey, Univ. of California–Berkeley – Urs Graf ’s Daughter Courage: Violence and Disability in Late Medieval Europe
2. Christopher Baswell, Barnard College – A Visual Database for Medieval Disability
3. Tirumular Narayanan, California State Univ.–Chico – Impaired in Camelot: An Analysis of Ableism in Hal Foster’s Prince Valiant
4. Kisha G. Tracy, Fitchburg State Univ. – Trope or Truth? Medievalism and the Ubiquity of Disability
5. Elizabeth Wawrzyniak, Marquette Univ.  – Life Was Like That: The Grotesque Medieval in the Modern Imagination

 

Sunday 10:30 AM

556 – SCHNEIDER 1325
Gray Matter: Brains, Diseases, and Disorders
Organizer: Deborah Thorpe, Univ. of York
Presider: Aleksandra Pfau, Hendrix College
1. Wendy J. Turner, Augusta Univ. – Treatment of Learning Disabilities and Other Mental Health Issues in Medieval English Medicine and Law
2. Agnes Karpinski, Univ. des Saarlandes  – Madness, Nightmares, Melancholy: Exceptional Mental States in Medieval Com-
mentaries on Aristotle’s De somno
3. Eliza Buhrer, Loyola Univ. New Orleans – Attention and Distraction in Medieval Thought

 

 

Full program of the Medieval congress here

News ! New serie editor – Monsters, Prodigies, and Demons: Medieval and Early Modern Constructions of Alterity – MIP University Press–Arc Humanities Press

Monsters, Prodigies, and Demons: Medieval and Early Modern Constructions of Alterity

This series is dedicated to the study of monstrosity and alterity in the medieval and early modern world, and to the investigation of cultural constructions of otherness, abnormality and difference from a wide range of perspectives. Submissions are welcome from scholars working within established disciplines, including—but not limited to—philosophy, critical theory, cultural history, history of science, history of art and architecture, literary studies, disability studies, and gender studies. Since much work in the field is necessarily pluridisciplinary in its methods and scope, the editors are particularly interested in proposals that cross disciplinary boundaries. The series publishes English-language, single-author volumes and collections of original essays. Topics might include hybridity and hermaphroditism; giants, dwarves, and wild-men; cannibalism and the New World; cultures of display and the carnivalesque; “monstrous” encounters in literature and travel; jurisprudence, law, and criminality; teratology and the “New Science”; the aesthetics of the grotesque; automata and self-moving machines; or witchcraft, demonology, and other occult themes.

Geographical Scope

Unrestricted

Chronological Scope

Late Medieval, Renaissance, and Early Modern

Series advisory board

  • Elizabeth B. Bearden (University of Wisconsin)
  • Jeffrey Jerome Cohen (George Washington University)
  • Surekha Davies (Western Connecticut State University)
  • Richard H. Godden (Louisiana State University)
  • Maria Fabricius Hansen (University of Copenhagen)
  • Virginia A. Krause (Brown University)
  • Jennifer Spinks (University of Melbourn)
  • Debra Higgs Strickland (University of Glasgow)
  • Wes Williams (University of Oxford)

Series editors

  • Kathleen Perry Long (Cornell University, USA)
  • Luke Morgan (Monash University, Australia)

 

More infos on the editor’s website

[About them : MIP offers rapid turn-around times, the newest digital policies (including full Open Access compliance), and global distribution. In North America books can be purchased through ISD and in Europe and the rest of the world through NBN International.]

New publication – Coming soon : « Living with Disfigurement in Early Medieval Europe » by Patricia Skinner

51704299

Living with Disfigurement in Early Medieval Europe

by Patricia Skinner

This book examines social and medical responses to the disfigured face in early medieval Europe, arguing that the study of head and facial injuries can offer a new contribution to the history of early medieval medicine and culture, as well as exploring the language of violence and social interactions. Despite the prevalence of warfare and conflict in early medieval society, and a veritable industry of medieval historians studying it, there has in fact been very little attention paid to the subject of head wounds and facial damage in the course of war and/or punitive justice. The impact of acquired disfigurement —for the individual, and for her or his family and community—is barely registered, and only recently has there been any attempt to explore the question of how damaged tissue and bone might be treated medically or surgically. In the wake of new work on disability and the emotions in the medieval period, this study documents how acquired disfigurement is recorded across different geographical and chronological contexts in the period.

About the author: Patricia Skinner is Research Professor in Arts and Humanities at Swansea University, UK. She is the Director of the Effaced from History project, sponsored by the Wellcome Trust, and has previously published books on gender, medicine, and health, in addition to the social history of southern Italy.

Review (on the ditor website): “In this uncommonly refreshing contribution to the vibrant historical discourse on marginalisation, Skinner engages with current concerns beyond her chronological and thematic focus, while eschewing anachronism and reductionism. With ample evidence and spirited argument, she challenges widespread generalisations about past attitudes—and exposes persistent prejudices—towards the physically different.” (Luke Demaitre, Visiting Professor, Center for Biomedical Ethics and Humanities, University of Virginia, and author of “Leprosy in Premodern Medicine: A Malady of the Whole Body”)

 

More infos on the editor’s website

 

19è rendez-vous de l’Histoire de Blois – Table Ronde 2016-10-06, 14h30 à 16h – L’histoire du handicap

Cartes blanches Table Ronde

2016-10-06, 14h30 – 16h Conseil départemental, Salle Kléber-Loustau

L’histoire du handicap

 

Cette table ronde vise à débattre des avancées historiographiques dans le champ de l’histoire du handicap. Plusieurs historiens spécialistes du handicap identifieront les apports des recherches effectuées pendant les décennies précédentes, les tendances de la recherche actuelle, et les chantiers de recherche à ouvrir.

Modérateurs

Gildas BREGAIN

Docteur en histoire, post-Doctorant IRIS/EHESS

 

Intervenants

Christophe CAPUANO

Maître de conférences en histoire contemporaine à l’université de Lyon

Mariama KABA

Docteure en histoire, responsable de recherche à l’Institut universitaire d’histoire de la médecine et de la santé publique à Lausanne

Caroline HUSQUIN

Agrégée d’histoire, doctorante en histoire romaine, ATER à l’Université de Bretagne-Sud

Plus d’informations ici