CFS – Disability History Association Outstanding Publication Award 2018: Outstanding Article or Book Chapter Award – 1st may 2018

CFS: DHA Outstanding Article or Book Chapter Award (1 May 2018)

Disability History Association Outstanding Publication Award 2018: Outstanding Article or Book Chapter Award

The Disability History Association (DHA) promotes the relevance of disability to broader historical enquiry and facilitates research, conference travel, and publication for scholars engaged in any field of disability history.

*****

DHA is excited to announce its 7th Annual Outstanding Publication Award.

In 2018, the award committee will accept article and book chapter submissions. Submissions are welcome from scholars in all fields who engage in work relating to the history of disability. Article and book chapter submissions may have one or multiple authors. They must contain new and original scholarship.

Although the award is open to all authors covering all geographic areas and time periods, the publication must be in English, and must have a publication date within the year preceding the submission date (i.e. 1/1/2017 – 5/1/2018). If your article or book chapter was published in 2017, or it will be published in the first four months of 2018, your article or book chapter is eligible for the prize.

The amount of the award is $200 for first place and $100 for honorable mention.

All submissions should be sent to the award committee care of Michael Rembis no later than May 1, 2018.

Authors should arrange for one electronic (.pdf or .doc) copy of the article or book chapter to be sent directly to the award committee at: Michael Rembis, Department of History, University at Buffalo, marembis@buffalo.edu.

In the interest of modeling best practices in the field of disability history, we require that the publisher/author provide an electronic copy in text-based .pdf or .doc file compatible with screen reading software for the review committee. We understand that copyright rules apply, and we will only use the electronic copy for the purposes of the DHA Outstanding Publication Award.  Manuscripts not provided in accessible electronic formats for screen reading software in a timely manner will not be considered for the prize.

Please include the full bibliographic citation of your submission in the Chicago Manual of Style format.

The Disability History Association Board will announce the recipient of the DHA Outstanding Publication Award in September 2018.

Members of the DHA Board are not eligible for the award.

More infos on H-Net.

Corps hybrides aux frontières de l’humain au Moyen Âge – Université catholique de Louvain, 19-20 avril 2018

Corps hybrides aux frontières de l’humain au Moyen Âge

Colloque international (Université catholique de Louvain, 19-20 avril 2018)

 

 

Programme

Jeudi 19 avril 2018

14h

Accueil des participants

14h30
Séance I / Imaginer la frontière de l’humain : entre texte et enluminure

Christine Ferlampin-Acher
(U. de Rennes II)
Le monstre Malegrape dans Artus de Bretagne (§§ 108 ss.) entre textes et images

Damien Kempf (U. of Liverpool)
Monstrous Tales, Monstrous Beasts : Saracens as Hybrids

András Borgó (U. Innsbruck)
Hybrid Bodies in Hebrew Manuscript Illuminations

16h

Pause café

16h30
Séance II / Narrations monstrueuses : fantaisie du soi et de l’autre

Miranda Griffin (U. of Cambridge)
Mélusine and Margaret : Assemblages and Monstrous Maternity

Jessy Simonini (ENS, Paris)
Cors, bras et chiere aveit semblant as noz: images du centaure dans le Roman de Troie

Antonella Sciancalepore
(UCLouvain)
Chevaliers-poisson et enfants-arbalète: recherches sur les hybridations humain-inorganique

Vendredi 20 avril 2018

9h15

Accueil

9h30

Séance III / Encadrer le monstre : la science face à l’hybride

Pierre-Olivier Dittmar (EHESS, Paris)
Le Monstres des hommes

Catherine Megan Crossley (U. of Liverpool)
Human or Hybrid? Medieval Monstrous Men and the Question of the Soul

10h30

Pause café

11h

Séance IV / Lost in time : les transformations de l’hybride

Jacqueline Leclercq-Marx (ULB, Bruxelles)
Une frontière très mouvante. L’humanisation du monstrueux dans le haut Moyen Âge et le Moyen Âge central

Grégory Clesse – Florence Ninitte (UCLouvain – U. zu Köln)
Pérégrinations des peuples hybrides dans les histoires et géographies de l’Orient

Clémence Gauche (U. de Nantes)
Identité aux frontières de l’humain : monstres et hybrides dans les sceaux de la fin du Moyen-Âge (XIIe-XVIe siècles)

 

13h45

Séance V / Table ronde conclusive

Modérée par Cristina Noacco (U. de Toulouse II) et Antonella Sciancalepore

 

More infos on the UCLouvain website.

Meeting – Workshop – The All-seeing eye? Vision and Eyesight Across Time and Cultures Workshop, 2018

The All-seeing eye?

Vision and Eyesight Across Time and Cultures Workshop, 2018

Wed 11 April 2018 – 09:30 – 17:00

 

A call for papers has been issued for this workshop which will explore medical, social, and cultural meanings of the eye and vision in contemporary and historical perspective. Vision has often provoked fascination within societies and cultures as the most revered sense. In Western Europe, the eye has been viewed scientifically as the most ‘exquisite’ organ, or spiritually as a ‘window to the soul’. These positions have had an influence on how the eye has been perceived, both as a vital organ and, by implication, one that needed to be protected. Whilst the eye could bring delight to its holder, and be symbolic in a variety of ways, it could also, when lost, incur significant impairment. The workshop will explore this vision impairment and correction, and the extent to which sight loss has been stigmatised. It will welcome papers that explore eyesight and its meanings across time and place, to encourage trans-historical and interdisciplinary discussion

 

Programme :

9.30am Registration 

10am Panel One

Dr Corinne Doria, Paris 1-Pantheon-Sorbonne University; University of Milan, ‘Defining Normal Vision. Eye charts in 19th Century Europe’

Dr Andy Flack, University of Bristol, ‘Vision and touch in the depths of the Mammoth Cave’

Dr Deborah Ellen Thorpe, Trinity College, Dublin, ‘“Mynde, ye, and hand”: A palaeographical approach to medieval eyesight deterioration’

First Break

11.45-12.45 Keynote

Professor Graeme Gooday, ‘Beyond the visual: alternatives to ocularcentric histories of bodies and technologies’

Lunch

 1.45pm Panel Two

 Dr Ben Curtis, University of Wolverhampton, ‘‘The dread now prevailing’: Miners’ Nystagmus in the South Wales Coalfield in the Early Twentieth Century’,

Dr Karen Beauchamp-Pyror, Honorary Research Fellow, College of Human and Health Sciences, Swansea University, ‘Losses and gains: the impact of regaining and restoring vision’

Dr Michelle Carr, College of Human and Health Sciences, Swansea University, ‘Seeing in Your Dreams’

Second Break

3.30pm Panel Three

 Colin Harding, AHRC CDP Candidate, Imperial War Museum and University of Brighton, ‘Repairing War’s Ravages: Horace Nicholls’ photographs of prosthetic masks’

Iain Riddell, PhD Student, University of Leicester, School of Media, Communication & Sociology (Member of the Science Advisory Committee for the Childhood Cancer Trust, 2015-2018), ‘Making a beginning Retinoblastoma in adulthood, psycho-social contexts and imperatives’

4.45-5pm Wrap up the Day

Contact Information:

Gemma.Almond@sciencemuseum.ac.uk or Gemma.Almond@swansea.ac.uk

More infos on their website

New publication – Book – Viewing Disability in Medieval Spanish Texts by Connie L. Scarborough.

Viewing Disability in Medieval Spanish Texts

by Connie L. Scarborough.

Amsterdam University Press,

Series: Premodern Health, Disease, and Disability

Description by the editor :

« This book is one of the first to examine medieval Spanish canonical works for their portrayals of disability in relationship to theological teachings, legal precepts, and medical knowledge. Connie L. Scarborough shows that physical impairments were seen differently through each lens. Theology at times taught that the disabled were « marked by God, » their sins rendered on their bodies; at other times, they were viewed as important objects of Christian charity. The disabled often suffered legal restrictions, allowing them to be viewed with other distinctive groups, such as the ill or the poor. And from a medical point of view, a miraculous cure could be seen as evidence of divine intervention. This book explores all these perspectives through medieval Spain’s miracle narratives, hagiographies, didactic tales, and epic poetry.  »

 

Table of Contents
Acknowledgements 9
Introduction: Disability Theory and Pre-Modern Considerations
Disability Theories: Definitions and Limitations
Adapting Disability Studies for the Pre-Modern Era
The Role of the Church and Christian Beliefs
Disability Studies and Literary Texts
Goals and Organization

1 Lameness – Los Contrechos 
Definitions and Theories
Legal Status
Historical and Pseudo-Scientific Accounts
Work and Occupational Hazards
Mobility Devices
Divine Punishment
Ridicule and Example
The Monstrous

2 Blindness – Los Ciegos 
Medieval Theories of Sight
Causes for Loss of Sight
Religious Beliefs
Begging and Charity
Blinding as Judicial Punishment
Blinding as Divine Punishment
Self-Blinding
Comic Potential

3 Deafness and Inability to Speak – Los Sordomudos 
Deaf vs. deaf
Legal status
Cures (?)
Popular Refrains and Wisdom Literature
Spiritual Autobiography/Pathography/Consolation
Loss of Speech

4 Leprosy – Los Gafos 
Medical Knowledge
Segregation (?)
The Leper as Metaphor
Leprosy as Divine Punishment
Leper as Holy Messenger
Leper as Figure in Religious History
Leprosy and ‘Tests of Friendship’

5 Cured by the Grace of God – Los Milagros 
The Medieval Concept of Miracle
Miracle Accounts
Missing Limbs
Lameness and Paralysis
Multiple Impairments
Blindness
Deafness and Inability to Speak
Leprosy
Interdependence of Disability and Divine Cure

6 Conclusions 
Works Cited
Index

 

More infos on the editor website.

Meetings – Seminar – Birkbeck Medieval Seminar: The Productive Medieval Body, Fri 1 June 2018, Keynes Library, School of Arts, Birkbeck, 43 Gordon Square, London.

Birkbeck Medieval Seminar: The Productive Medieval Body

Fri 1 June 2018,

Keynes Library, School of Arts, Birkbeck, 43 Gordon Square, London.

 

The Birkbeck Medieval Seminar is an annual event. It is free and open to all scholars of the Middle Ages. It is designed to foster conversation and debate on a particular topic within medieval studies by providing the opportunity to hear new research from experts in the field. We are a welcoming and inclusive environment. This venue is fully accessible. Please contact Isabel Davis (i.davis@bbk.ac.uk) for further information or if you need help using the registration site.

Speakers:

Kim Phillips (Auckland);

Maaike van der Lugt (Paris – Diderot);

Vincent Gillespie (Lady Margaret Hall, Oxford)

and Alicia Spencer-Hall (UCL).

Titles to be confirmed.

Coffee and tea is provided but you will need to find or bring your own lunch.

Please note: this is a free event and, as such, if you book a ticket and later find out that you cannot attend, please do cancel your booking so that your place can be made available to someone else.

 

More infos on the Evenbrite of the event