New book – Disability in Medieval Christian Philosophy and Theology – Edited by Scott M. Williams – publ. by Routledge

Disability in Medieval Christian Philosophy and Theology – Edited by Scott M. Williams

Description

This book uses the tools of analytic philosophy and close readings of medieval Christian philosophical and theological texts in order to survey what these thinkers said about what today we call ‘disability.’ The chapters also compare what these medieval authors say with modern and contemporary philosophers and theologians of disability. This dual approach enriches our understanding of the history of disability in medieval Christian philosophy and theology and opens up new avenues of research for contemporary scholars working on disability.

The volume is divided into three parts. Part One addresses theoretical frameworks regarding disability, particularly on questions about the definition(s) of ‘disability’ and how disability relates to well-being. The chapters are then divided into two further parts in order to reflect ways that medieval philosophers and theologians theorized about disability. Part Two is on disability in this life, and Part Three is on disability in the afterlife. Taken as a whole, these chapters support two general observations. First, these philosophical theologians sometimes resist Greco-Roman ableist views by means of theological and philosophical anti-ableist arguments and counterexamples. Here we find some surprising disability-positive perspectives that are built into different accounts of a happy human life. We also find equal dignity of all human beings no matter ability or disability. Second, some of the seeds for modern and contemporary ableist views were developed in medieval Christian philosophy and theology, especially with regard to personhood and rationality, an intellectualist interpretation of the imago Dei, and the identification of human dignity with the use of reason.

This volume surveys disability across a wide range of medieval Christian writers from the time of Augustine up to Francisco Suarez. It will be of interest to scholars and graduate students working in medieval philosophy and theology, or disability studies.

Table of Contents

Introduction

Scott M. Williams

Part I. Theoretical Frameworks

1. Plurality in Medieval Concepts of Disability

Kevin Timpe

Part II. Disability in this Life

2. Medieval Aristotelians on Congenital Disabilities and their Early Modern Critics

Gloria Frost

3. Personhood, Ethics, and Disability: A Comparison of Byzantine, Boethian, and Modern Concepts of Personhood

Scott M. Williams

4. The Imago Dei / Trinitatis and Disabled Persons: The Limitations of Intellectualism in Late Medieval Theology

John T. Slotemaker

5. Remembering ‘Mindless’ Persons: Intellectual Disability, Spanish Colonialism, and the Disappearance of a Medieval Account of Persons who Lack the Use of Reason

Miguel J. Romero

6. Deafness and Pastoral Care in the Middle Ages

Jenni Kuuliala and ReimaVälimäki

7. Taking the ‘Dis’ out of Disability: Martyrs, Mothers, and Mystics in the Middle Ages

Christina Van Dyke

Part III. Disability in the Afterlife

8. Separated Souls: Disability in the Intermediate State

Mark K. Spencer

9. Disability and Resurrection

Richard Cross

10. Relative Disability and Transhuman Happiness: St. Thomas Aquinas on the Beatific Vision

Thomas M. Ward

 

More info on the editor website

New book – Intellectual disability. A conceptual history, 1200–1900, Edited by Dr Patrick McDonagh, C. F. Goodey and Timothy Stainton

Intellectual disability. A conceptual history, 1200–1900
Edited by Dr Patrick McDonagh, C. F. Goodey and Timothy Stainton
Publisher: Manchester University Press
Format: Hardcover
This collection explores the historical origins of our modern concepts of intellectual or learning disability. The essays, from some of the leading historians of ideas of intellectual disability, focus on British and European material from the Middle Ages to the late-nineteenth century and extend across legal, educational, literary, religious, philosophical and psychiatric histories. They investigate how precursor concepts and discourses were shaped by and interacted with their particular social, cultural and intellectual environments, eventually giving rise to contemporary ideas. The collection is essential reading for scholars interested in the history of intelligence, intellectual disability and related concepts, as well as in disability history generally.
Published Date: January 2018
Pages: 296
ISBN: 978-1-5261-2531-6

CONTENTS

1 Introduction: the emergent critical history of intellectual disability – Patrick McDonagh, C. F. Goodey, and Tim Stainton
2 Conceptualization of intellectual disability in medieval English law – Wendy J. Turner
3 ‘Will-nots’ and ‘Cannots’: tracing a trope in medieval thought – Irina Metzler
4 ‘Some have it from birth, some by disposition’: foolishness in medieval German literature – Janina Dillig
5 Exclusion from the eucharist: the seventeenth-century church and the creation of ‘intellectually’ disabled people – C. F. Goodey
6 ‘A defect in the mind’: cognitive ableism in Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels – D. Christopher Gabbard
7 The age of sensationalism and the construction of intellectual disability – Tim Stainton
8 Peter the ‘wild boy’: what Peter means to us – Katie Branch, Clemma Fleat, Nicola Grove, Tim Lumley Smith, and Robin Meader
9 ‘Belief’, ‘opinion’, and ‘knowledge’: the idiot in law in the the long eighteenth century – Simon Jarrett
10 Idiocy and the conceptual economy of madness – Murray K. Simpson
11 Visiting Earlswood: the asylum travelogue and the shaping of ‘idiocy’ – Patrick McDonagh
Select bibliography
Index

More infos on the editor website

CFP – Less than two weeks remaining to get your individual paper proposals for IMC Leeds on « Otherness »

The twenty-third International Medieval Congress, Leeds, 3-6 July 2017.

The International Medieval Congress (IMC) is organised and administered by the Institute for Medieval Studies (IMS). Since its start in 1994, the Congress has established itself as an annual event with an attendance of over 2,200 medievalists from all over the world. It is the largest conference of its kind in Europe.

Drawing medievalists from over 50 countries, with over 1,700 individual papers and 580 academic sessions and a wide range of concerts, performances, readings, round tables, excursions, bookfair and associated events, the Leeds International Medieval Congress is Europe’s largest annual gathering in the humanities.

The IMC provides an interdisciplinary forum for the discussion of all aspects of Medieval Studies. Paper and session proposals on any topic related to the Middle Ages are welcome. However, every year, the IMC chooses a special thematic strand which – for 2017 – is ‘Otherness’. This focus has been chosen for its wide application across all centuries and regions and its impact on all disciplines devoted to this epoch.

‘Others’ can be found everywhere: outside one’s own community (from foreigners to non-human monsters) and inside it (for example, religious and social minorities, or individual newcomers in towns, villages, or at court). One could encounter the ‘Others’ while travelling, in writing, reading and thinking about them, by assessing and judging them, by ‘feelings’ ranging from curiosity to contempt, and behaviour towards them which, in turn, can lead to integration or exclusion, friendship or hostility, and support or persecution.

The demarcation of the ‘Self’ from ‘Others’ applies to all areas of life, to concepts of thinking and mentalité as well as to social ‘reality’, social intercourse and transmission of knowledge and opinions. Forms and concepts of the ‘Other’, and attitudes towards ‘Others’, imply and reveal concepts of ‘Self’, self-awareness and identity, whether expressed explicitly or implicitly. There is no ‘Other’ without ‘Self’. A classification as ‘Others’ results from a comparison with oneself and one’s own identity groups. Thus, attitudes towards ‘Others’ oscillate between admiring and detesting, and invite questioning into when the ‘Other’ becomes the ‘Strange’.

The aim of the IMC is to cover the entire spectrum of ‘Otherness’ through multi-disciplinary approaches, on a geographical, ethnic, political, social, legal, intellectual and even personal level, to analyse sources from all genres, areas, and regions.

Possible entities to research for ‘Otherness’ could include (but are not limited to):
• Peoples, kingdoms, languages, towns, villages, migrants, refugees, bishoprics, trades, guilds, or seigneurial systems
• Faiths and religions, religious groups (including deviation from the ‘true’ faith) and religious orders
• Different social classes, minorities, or marginal groups
• The spectrum from ‘Strange’ to ‘Familiar’
• Individuals or ‘strangers’ of any kind, newcomers as well as people exhibiting strange behaviour
• Otherness related to art, music, liturgical practices, or forms of worship
• Any further specific determinations of ‘alterity’

Methodologies and Approaches to ‘Otherness’ (not necessarily distinct, but overlapping) could include:
• Definitions, concepts, and constructions of ‘Otherness’
• Indicators of, criteria and reasons for demarcation
• Relation(s) between ‘Otherness’ and concepts of ‘Self’
• Communication, encounters, and social intercourse with ‘Others’ (in embassies, travels, writings, quarrels, conflicts, and persecution)
• Knowledge, perception, and assessment of the ‘Others’
• Attitudes and behaviour towards ‘Others’
• Deviation from any ‘norms’ of life and thought (from the superficial to the fundamental)
• Gender and transgender perspectives
• Co-existence and segregation
• Methodological problems when inquiring into ‘Otherness’
• The Middle Ages as the ‘Other’ compared with contemporary times (‘Othering’ the Middle Ages).

The Special Thematic Strand ‘Otherness‘ will be co-ordinated by Hans-Werner Goetz (Historisches Seminar, Universität Hamburg).

 

Please find by cliking this link or below all informations:

Session Proposal

Paper Proposal

Round Table Proposal

CFP – 10th Anniversary Annual Meeting – Disease, Disability & Medicine in Medieval Europe

Disease, Disability & Medicine in Medieval Europe
10th Anniversary Annual Meeting, Swansea University 2-4 December 2016 at the National Waterfront Museum, Swansea

Disability and Religion

This three-day conference forms the tenth workshop in the D&D series and aims to explore the interactions between disability and medicine in the Middle Ages by bringing together established scholars and postgraduates, international discourses and theoretical approaches from across a wide range of the humanities and sciences.
Paper proposals are invited on, but certainly not limited to, the following topics:

• Medieval disability and the ‘religious model’ of disability
• Disability and charity
• Medieval theological concepts of disability
• Canon law and disability
• Interstices of law and medicine in the Middle Ages
• Religion versus science/medicine?
• Devotion, piety and religiosity and voluntary disability
• Disability as form of religious expression
• Corporality and disembodied disability
• Disability between confliciting notions of physical and spiritual health
• Disability and the afterlife

Please submit a 300 word abstract for a 20 to 30 minute paper, together with a brief biography, to I.V.Metzler@swansea.ac.uk by 1 October 2016. If you have any queries please contact Dr Irina Metzler at the same email address.
Attendance at the conference will be free to all participants but numbers are limited to 50 attendees.
Accessibility information: The conference will take place on the first floor of the National Waterfront Museum, Swansea, which has wheelchair accessible lifts. The lecture theatres are wheelchair accessible and special dietary requirements can be catered for.

Download the CFP in .pdf