CFP – Leeds 2017 – Pilgrimage: restoring physical, mental and spiritual health

Call for Papers: IMC Leeds 2017

Pilgrimage: Restoring Physical, Mental, and Spiritual Health

Sponsored by the Graduate Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Reading.
The thematic strand for the next International Medieval Congress (3-6 July 2017) at University of Leeds is Otherness. We invite you to submit proposals for 20-minute papers to take part in one or more sessions on the theme of pilgrimage as a restorative process between physical, mental, and spiritual sickness and health. We are particularly interested in papers that address identifications of pilgrims as “others” who were undertaking a unique physical and spiritual journey. Relevant topics include but are not limited to:
• Miraculous healing.

• Penitential pilgrimage.

• Proxy pilgrimage.

• Pilgrimage journeys.

• Experiences of pilgrims at shrines.

• Relics and saintly intercession.

• Monastic and lay interactions with the cult of saints.

If you would like to take part in these sessions, please send an abstract of no more than 200 words as well as a short bio to claire.trenery.2008@live.rhul.ac.uk by Friday 16 September 2016.

Organisers Ruth Salter (University of Reading, ) & Claire Treneryand (Royal Holloway, University of London, )

CFP – Landscapes/Seascapes – Leeds IMC 2016

Call for papers: Leeds International Medieval Congress 4-7 July 2016

The Medieval Landscape/Seascape

Following on from a successful strand of sessions for the last two years, it has been suggested that we continue in 2016!

Writing about the medieval landscape and environment has a rich and long tradition and is an area in which many of the disciplines that comprise medieval studies have made significant contributions. Scholars working on ideas of the landscape, concepts of space and place as well as in the developing field of environmental humanities have added to our theoretical framework for understanding people’s relationships with the environment in the past. We hope to organise a series of sessions focusing on medieval landscapes/seascapes broadly conceived. We welcome proposals that draw on historical, literary, archaeological, art-historical and musicological approaches and sources.

For 2016, we would like to focus on these themes related to landscapes/seascapes:

  1. Performance: Walking, perambulation, pilgrimage, plays/drama, battle rituals, movement, hunting, magic, rituals;
  2. Memory: Reclamation of empty places, re-use of place, how places in the past are remembered in the present, recording and memory tools,  forgetting/remembering, memorials, post- Black death and spaces/place, connections to past places (e.g. ancient wells, forests);
  3. Journey/Journeys: Itineraries, migrations, pilgrimage, crusades, travel narratives, roads and movement to and thru places, exploration, navigation, map making;
  4. Food & Famine: Production, fishing, preserving, designed spaces (gardens), field usage, empty spaces post plague or famine, images of landscape/seascape in manuscripts, activities related to food.

Potential contributors might like to think about the following ideas/concepts when suggesting a paper in the above themes:

  • the place of the landscape/seascape in historical writing
  • landscape/maritime archaeology
  • medieval urban landscapes
  • the landscape of particular events
  • experiencing the landscape/seascape
  • tools and theories for understanding the medieval landscape/seascape: e.g. digital humanities, knowledge exchange, mapping, etc.
  • different national landscape traditions, including antiquarian and chorographic traditions, and how they affect our understanding of the medieval past.

 

It is hoped that, through these sessions we will raise and begin to answer a number of key questions about landscapes/seascapes in the Middle Ages. What is the relationship between the experience and conceptualisation of landscapes/seascape? What gaps exist in the evidence for the landscape/seascape as a physical, economic, social and cultural phenomenon, and can interdisciplinary work help us to bridge these? What innovative methods and approaches can we bring to the study of medieval landscape/seascape?

Please send abstracts for 20 minute papers to Kimm Curran, University of Glasgow by no later than 15 September 2015. By clicking here and provide the following:

  • Title
  • Abstract (max 200 words)
  • Your name, institution, and role
  • Full postal and electronic contact details (these will be used by Leeds IMC to contact you, post the programme, etc.)

All information on their website !

CFP – Less than two weeks remaining to get your individual paper proposals for IMC Leeds on “Otherness”

The twenty-third International Medieval Congress, Leeds, 3-6 July 2017.

The International Medieval Congress (IMC) is organised and administered by the Institute for Medieval Studies (IMS). Since its start in 1994, the Congress has established itself as an annual event with an attendance of over 2,200 medievalists from all over the world. It is the largest conference of its kind in Europe.

Drawing medievalists from over 50 countries, with over 1,700 individual papers and 580 academic sessions and a wide range of concerts, performances, readings, round tables, excursions, bookfair and associated events, the Leeds International Medieval Congress is Europe’s largest annual gathering in the humanities.

The IMC provides an interdisciplinary forum for the discussion of all aspects of Medieval Studies. Paper and session proposals on any topic related to the Middle Ages are welcome. However, every year, the IMC chooses a special thematic strand which – for 2017 – is ‘Otherness’. This focus has been chosen for its wide application across all centuries and regions and its impact on all disciplines devoted to this epoch.

‘Others’ can be found everywhere: outside one’s own community (from foreigners to non-human monsters) and inside it (for example, religious and social minorities, or individual newcomers in towns, villages, or at court). One could encounter the ‘Others’ while travelling, in writing, reading and thinking about them, by assessing and judging them, by ‘feelings’ ranging from curiosity to contempt, and behaviour towards them which, in turn, can lead to integration or exclusion, friendship or hostility, and support or persecution.

The demarcation of the ‘Self’ from ‘Others’ applies to all areas of life, to concepts of thinking and mentalité as well as to social ‘reality’, social intercourse and transmission of knowledge and opinions. Forms and concepts of the ‘Other’, and attitudes towards ‘Others’, imply and reveal concepts of ‘Self’, self-awareness and identity, whether expressed explicitly or implicitly. There is no ‘Other’ without ‘Self’. A classification as ‘Others’ results from a comparison with oneself and one’s own identity groups. Thus, attitudes towards ‘Others’ oscillate between admiring and detesting, and invite questioning into when the ‘Other’ becomes the ‘Strange’.

The aim of the IMC is to cover the entire spectrum of ‘Otherness’ through multi-disciplinary approaches, on a geographical, ethnic, political, social, legal, intellectual and even personal level, to analyse sources from all genres, areas, and regions.

Possible entities to research for ‘Otherness’ could include (but are not limited to):
• Peoples, kingdoms, languages, towns, villages, migrants, refugees, bishoprics, trades, guilds, or seigneurial systems
• Faiths and religions, religious groups (including deviation from the ‘true’ faith) and religious orders
• Different social classes, minorities, or marginal groups
• The spectrum from ‘Strange’ to ‘Familiar’
• Individuals or ‘strangers’ of any kind, newcomers as well as people exhibiting strange behaviour
• Otherness related to art, music, liturgical practices, or forms of worship
• Any further specific determinations of ‘alterity’

Methodologies and Approaches to ‘Otherness’ (not necessarily distinct, but overlapping) could include:
• Definitions, concepts, and constructions of ‘Otherness’
• Indicators of, criteria and reasons for demarcation
• Relation(s) between ‘Otherness’ and concepts of ‘Self’
• Communication, encounters, and social intercourse with ‘Others’ (in embassies, travels, writings, quarrels, conflicts, and persecution)
• Knowledge, perception, and assessment of the ‘Others’
• Attitudes and behaviour towards ‘Others’
• Deviation from any ‘norms’ of life and thought (from the superficial to the fundamental)
• Gender and transgender perspectives
• Co-existence and segregation
• Methodological problems when inquiring into ‘Otherness’
• The Middle Ages as the ‘Other’ compared with contemporary times (‘Othering’ the Middle Ages).

The Special Thematic Strand ‘Otherness‘ will be co-ordinated by Hans-Werner Goetz (Historisches Seminar, Universität Hamburg).

 

Please find by cliking this link or below all informations:

Session Proposal

Paper Proposal

Round Table Proposal

CFP – The Medieval Brain Workshop, University of York, March 10th and 11th, 2017.

The Medieval Brain Workshop. University of York, 10th & 11th March 2017.

As we research aspects of the medieval brain, we encounter complications generated by medieval thought and twenty-first century medicine and neurology alike. Our understanding of modern-day neurology, psychiatry, disability studies, and psychology rests on shifting sands. Not only do we struggle with medieval terminology concerning the brain, but we have to connect it with a constantly-moving target of modern understanding. Though we strive to avoid interpreting the past using presentist terms, it is difficult – or impossible – to work independently of the framework of our own modern understanding. This makes research into the medieval brain and ways of thinking both challenging and exciting. As we strive to know more about specifically medieval experiences, while simultaneously widening our understanding of the brain today, we much negotiate a great deal of complexity.

In this two-day workshop, to be held at the University of York on Friday 10th and Saturday 11th March 2017 under the auspices of the Centre for Chronic Diseases and Disorders, we will explore the topic of ‘the medieval brain’ in the widest possible sense. The ultimate aim is to provide a forum for discussion, stimulating new collaborations from a multitude of voices on, and approaches to, the theme.

This call is for papers to comprise a series of themed sessions of papers and/or roundtables that approach the subject from a range of different, or an interweaving of, disciplines. Potential topics of discussion might include, but are not restricted to:

  • Mental health
  • Neurology
  • The history of emotions
  • Disability and impairment
  • Terminology and the brain
  • Ageing and thinking
  • Retrospective diagnosis and the Middle Ages
  • Interdisciplinary practice and the brain
  • The care of the sick
  • Herbals and medieval medical texts

Research that grapples with terminology, combines unconventional disciplinary approaches, and/or sparks debates around the themes is particularly welcome. We will be encouraging diversity, and welcome speakers from all backgrounds, including those from outside of traditional academia. All efforts will be made to ensure that the conference is made accessible to those who are not able to attend through live-tweeting and through this blog.

Please send abstracts of up to 250 words for independent papers, or expressiond of interest for roundtable topics/themed paper panels, by Friday 21st October, to Deborah Thorpe at: deborah.thorpe@york.ac.uk.

 

Find the Call for paper on their blog for a two-day interdisciplinary workshop, supported by the Centre for Chronic Diseases and Disorders at the University of York.

CFP – 10th Anniversary Annual Meeting – Disease, Disability & Medicine in Medieval Europe

Disease, Disability & Medicine in Medieval Europe
10th Anniversary Annual Meeting, Swansea University 2-4 December 2016 at the National Waterfront Museum, Swansea

Disability and Religion

This three-day conference forms the tenth workshop in the D&D series and aims to explore the interactions between disability and medicine in the Middle Ages by bringing together established scholars and postgraduates, international discourses and theoretical approaches from across a wide range of the humanities and sciences.
Paper proposals are invited on, but certainly not limited to, the following topics:

• Medieval disability and the ‘religious model’ of disability
• Disability and charity
• Medieval theological concepts of disability
• Canon law and disability
• Interstices of law and medicine in the Middle Ages
• Religion versus science/medicine?
• Devotion, piety and religiosity and voluntary disability
• Disability as form of religious expression
• Corporality and disembodied disability
• Disability between confliciting notions of physical and spiritual health
• Disability and the afterlife

Please submit a 300 word abstract for a 20 to 30 minute paper, together with a brief biography, to I.V.Metzler@swansea.ac.uk by 1 October 2016. If you have any queries please contact Dr Irina Metzler at the same email address.
Attendance at the conference will be free to all participants but numbers are limited to 50 attendees.
Accessibility information: The conference will take place on the first floor of the National Waterfront Museum, Swansea, which has wheelchair accessible lifts. The lecture theatres are wheelchair accessible and special dietary requirements can be catered for.

Download the CFP in .pdf

Rechercher dans OpenEdition Search

Vous allez être redirigé vers OpenEdition Search