New Book – Poison, Medicine, and Disease in Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe, by Frederick W Gibbs

Poison, Medicine, and Disease in Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe

Frederick W Gibbs

 

Features (from the editor website)

Challenges the standard histories of toxicology

Multi-faceted and innovative approach

Brings new perspectives to the study of the history of medicine

Summary (from the editor website)

This book presents a uniquely broad and pioneering history of premodern toxicology by exploring how late medieval and early modern (c. 1200–1600) physicians discussed the relationship between poison, medicine, and disease. Drawing from a wide range of medical and natural philosophical texts—with an emphasis on treatises that focused on poison, pharmacotherapeutics, plague, and the nature of disease—this study brings to light premodern physicians’ debates about the potential existence, nature, and properties of a category of substance theoretically harmful to the human body in even the smallest amount. Focusing on the category of poison (venenum) rather than on specific drugs reframes and remixes the standard histories of toxicology, pharmacology, and etiology, as well as shows how these aspects of medicine (although not yet formalized as independent disciplines) interacted with and shaped one another. Physicians argued, for instance, about what properties might distinguish poison from other substances, how poison injured the human body, the nature of poisonous bodies, and the role of poison in spreading, and to some extent defining, disease. The way physicians debated these questions shows that poison was far from an obvious and uncontested category of substance, and their effort to understand it sheds new light on the relationship between natural philosophy and medicine in the late medieval and early modern periods.

CFP – Technologies of Health, 1400-1700 – Renaissance Society of America Annual Meeting, Toronto, 17-19 March, 2019

Technologies of Health, 1400-1700
Call for Papers
RSA Annual Meeting, Toronto, 17-19 March, 2019
Deadline: July 1, 2018

The goal of this session is to explore technological developments in health and medicine between 1400- 1700. We seek contributions that focus on the promotion of new tools and therapies for health benefits among individuals and populations, or on the salubriousness of buildings and cities through innovative materials or structural and urban infrastructures. Approaches that center on technologies for healthy living and disease prevention, and not simply reactionary treatments or responses to crises, are also welcome. Additionally, proposals may consider the provisional character of technological developments as processes in order to examine failures in the history of health and medicine. We encourage interdisciplinary papers that engage contemporary treatises, intersections of religious and therapeutic practices, and the visual and material culture of health, as well as submissions that incorporate the global circulation of knowledge during the period.

Please submit paper proposals to Danielle Abdon (danielle.abdon@temple.edu) and Elizabeth Duntemann (elizabeth.duntemann@temple.edu) by July 1, 2018. Each proposal must include a paper title (max. 15 words), 150-word abstract, short CV (max. 300 words), and keywords.

More info on the organisators website.