Call for contribution for Edited Volume – Cripping the Archive: Disability, Power, and History

May 15, 2021
 
Archival Science, Ethnic History / Studies, History of Science, Medicine, and Technology, Women’s & Gender History / Studies, World History / Studies

Cripping the Archive: Disability, Power, and History
(Edited by Jenifer Barclay and Stefanie Hunt-Kennedy)

“The archive” writes Cameroonian scholar Achilles Mbembe, “is fundamentally a matter of discrimination and of selection, which, in the end, results in the granting of a privileged status to certain written documents, and the refusal of that same status to others, thereby judged ‘unarchivable’. The archive is, therefore, not a piece of data, but a status.” In recent years, historians have paid increasing attention to the archives not simply as sites of knowledge but as sites of power and inequality. Their work has brought renewed visibility to the fact that not all pasts are deemed worthy of being documented, archived, retrieved, and written about in the present. This is perhaps especially true for people with disabilities who are paradoxically hypervisible and invisible in the archive. Although disabled people appear in the archive in a variety of familiar sources – from curiosity cabinets to medical records – their voices are often marginalized or silenced. Even in historical scholarship, disabled individuals remain under-explored in spite of the expansion of disability history.

This collection will explore the relationship between disability and the archive. We envision essays that collectively challenge “compulsory able-bodiedness”/able-mindedness (McRuer, 2006) – the ubiquitous beliefs and practices that center able-bodiedness in service of normativity. We invite contributors to ‘crip’ the archive, to adopt a critical orientation that illuminates and disrupts ableist power structures and dynamics and analyze how ableness informs the politics of the archive as a physical space, a sacred place, a discriminatory record, and a collection of silences. We seek work that uses a wide range of methods from authors who foreground the lived experiences and representations of disability in their work. We also strongly encourage submissions that use intersectional, interdisciplinary, and transnational approaches to the question of disability and the archive. We welcome submissions from scholars, writers, and artists and will accept 300-500-word abstracts for this collection through May 15, 2021.

Topics include, but are not limited to:
●    Objects, museums, curiosities; disability on display
●    The absence of disability in archival finding aids and indexes
●    The paradox of disability as both hypervisible and invisible in the historical record and archival imagination
●    Centering disability in the archives of medicine, science, and technology
●    The accessibility of archival spaces and materials
●    The impact of charged and negative disability terminology in changing historical contexts (i.e. monstrous, mad, deaf and dumb, crippled, superannuated, invalid, retardation)
●    Uncovering forgotten histories of disability in the archive and revisiting familiar archival sources through a disability lens
●    Identifying and confronting archival erasures rooted in intersectionality
●    Disability approaches to digital archives
●    The archive as a space of resistance (i.e. the reclamation of knowledge systems, ontologies, and identities structured by disability)
●    Decolonizing the archive of disability, Eurocentric understandings of the body and disability
●    Disability and the archive in transnational perspective
●    Myths of overcoming and inspirational narratives in the archives
●    The challenges of locating disability in already contested archives (e.g. slavery, colonialism, etc.)

Please submit abstracts (300-500 words), an abbreviated CV, and a short bio to editors Jenifer Barclay (barclay7@buffalo.edu) and Stefanie Hunt-Kennedy (hunt.kennedy@unb.ca) by May 15 2021

 

Contact Info: 
 

Jenifer L. Barclay, University at Buffalo – barclay7@buffalo.edu

Stefanie Hunt-Kennedy, University of New Brunswick – hunt.kennedy@unb.ca

Contact Email: 
 

Online conference – Composing Disability Conference: « A Cultural History of Disability », hosted by the OrganizerGeorge Washington University – April 9th – 5:00 PM – 11:00 PM CEST

 

About this Event

We are happy to announce that the Composing Disability conference that was postponed last year will be returning virtually on April 9th, 2021. Please join us in celebrating the publication of A Cultural History of Disability. This six-volume collection focus on Antiquity, the Middle Ages, the Renaissance, the Long Eighteenth Century, the Long Nineteenth Century, and the Modern Age. The presenters for the event are listed below in the program and feature Martha Stoddard Holmes of California State, San Marcos and Joyce Huff of Ball State University (GW English PhD, 2001) who will deliver the keynote address for this event. All six volumes of A Cultural History of Disability will be available through the Gelman Library.

Composing Disability: A Cultural History of Disability is free and open to the public and will take place on April 9th, 2020 as a virtual event. The conference will feature live transcription and an ASL interpreter.

A Cultural History of Disability includes numerous participants from GW. The general editors for the six-volume series are David Bolt and GW English Professor Robert McRuer. The volume on the Middle Ages is edited by Professor Jonathan Hsy, along with Tory V. Pearman and Joshua R. Eyler, and the volume on the Modern Age is edited by Professor David T. Mitchell and Sharon L. Snyder. Department Chair Professor Maria Frawley has a chapter in the Nineteenth Century volume and PhD candidate Emily Lathrop has a chapter in the Renaissance volume. The volume on the Modern Age includes contributions from PhD candidate Zahari Richter, Samuel Yates (GW English PhD, 2019), and Theodora Danylevich (GW English PhD, 2018). The Renaissance volume also includes a chapter by Gallaudet Professor Jennifer Nelson, who received her BA from GW English in 1988. Alan Montroso (GW English PhD, 2019) and Haylie Swenson (GW English PhD, 2018) will also participate in the event.

A Cultural History of Disability spans more than 2,500 years. Bolt and McRuer write in the series preface: « A ‘system of representation,’ according to Stuart Hall, ‘consists, not of individual concepts, but of different ways of organizing, clustering, arranging, and classifying concepts, and of establishing complex relations between them.’ From this cultural studies perspective, a cultural history of disability is attuned to how disabled people have been caught up in systems of representation that, over the centuries (and with real, material effects), have variously contained, disciplined, marginalized, or normalized them. A cultural history of disability also, however, traces the ways in which disabled people themselves have authored or contested representations, shifting or altering the complex relations of power that determine the meanings of disability experience. »

Please join us on April 9th!

SCHEDULE OF EVENTS

11:00 AM-12:30 PM ROUNDTABLE: A Cultural History of Disability in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. Moderator: Jonathan Hsy

Haylie Swenson, « Disability Studies and Animal Studies »

Alan Montroso, « Monstrosity, Disability, Ecology »

Emily Lathrop, « Learning Difficulties: The Idiot and the Outsider in the Renaissance »

Jennifer Nelson, « Deafnesses and Silences in Shakespeare’s England »

1:30-3 PM ROUNDTABLE: A Cultural History of Disability in the Nineteenth Century and the Modern Age. Moderator: David Mitchell

Maria Frawley, « Chronic Pain: ‘The Wounded Soldiery of Mankind' »

Theodora Danylevich, « Chronic Pain and Illness: States of Privilege and Bodies of Abuse »

Zara Richter, « Speech Disability’s Awkward Late Modernity: A Multimodal Historical Approach »

Samuel Yates, « Deafness: Screening Signs in Contemporary Cinema »

3:30-5 PM Keynote Address: Martha Stoddard Holmes and Joyce Huff, editors of A Cultural History of Disability in the Long Nineteenth Century. Moderator: Robert McRuer

Call for Papers — Tijdschrift voor Genderstudies/Journal of Gender Studies – Dis/abling Gender – ed. by Amsterdam University Press and Tijdschrift voor Genderstudies

Special Issue Guest Editors: Evelien Geerts, Josephine Hoegaerts, Kristien Hens, Daniel Blackie

The recent, and ongoing, COVID-19 pandemic has made explicit what many of us already knew: good health and able-bodiedness are fluid and uncertain states. We can only ever hold them precariously (Butler 2004; Scully 2014), as their value and definition are intrinsically unstable and intersectionally linked to situated intelligibility systems that attribute meaning to gender, race/ethnicity, sexual orientation, class, and many other lived identity categories and labels (Parker 2015). What it means to be dis/able(d) has changed radically over time—and is still changing—under the policing influence of normalcy-dictating medical-psychiatric discourses and neoliberal bio-/necropolitical regimes (Tremain 2006; Chen 2012), while simultaneously being positively impacted by grassroots intersectional disability justice activism (Mingus 2011; Piepzna-Samarasinha 2018), critical disability studies, and critical pedagogical frameworks.

The COVID-19 crisis has had a brutal impact on the world and its population, and specifically on those whose bodies were already constructed to matter less through the intertwined, negatively constructed binaries that uphold the exclusivist notion of the ‘pure’, ‘neutral’  and healthy human subject. At the same time, the crisis also has demonstrated the porosity of these oppositional boundaries, such as the boundaries drawn between the human, non-human, more-than-human, and the perpetually dehumanised, the personal/political, and the able/disabledbodied: The SARS-CoV-2 virus and the patchwork of crises it has created (and reinforced) does not only point at human identity and subjectivity being more in flux and in conjunction with (more-than-human) others than the Cartesian self tells us, but also demonstrates that the condition of vulnerability is an existentially shared one and therefore cannot be subsumed under one linear temporal framework. Long COVID, for instance, demonstrates how vulnerable we all are, in the end, and how the linear temporal framework backing up the (dis)abledness narrative needs to be urgently queered, and also placed in the context of longer histories of crisis, in which experiences of ill health, mutilation, and various dis/abilities have played an important role (Bourke 1996; Nair 2020). Another aspect that the pandemic crisis has underlined sharply, is the fact that both the experience of—and the care for—able and disabled bodies is an intrinsically gendered affair (Forestell 2006). These experiences are furthermore deeply bound up with equally gendered notions of labour, authority, and autonomy (Rose 2017); a topic that has been central to the discipline of gender studies from the outset.

Taking the foregoing into account, this special issue of Tijdschrift voor Genderstudies (Journal of Gender Studies), wishes to explore the intersections between complex lived experiences of dis/ability and gender through an explicit engagement with the links and tensions between the scholarly and activist fields of gender studies and critical disability studies (see e.g., Meekosha & Shuttleworth 2009) while taking stock of important present-day turns and debates in and at the intersections of both fields.

More concretely: What happens, this issue wonders, if we take the call—contested by scholars such as Bone (2017) but at the same time emphasised by Kafer (2013)—for ‘cripping’ scholarship, policy, and practice seriously in gender studies and feminism? What happens if we think beyond transdisciplinary exchange, and purposefully stretch towards a theoretical framework and grounded practice of dis/abling gender studies? How can the insights and methods of critical disability studies, with its radical turn toward vulnerability, diversity, and resilience push gender studies toward new understandings of identity, corporeal praxis, labour, and care? How can gender studies, and specifically, novel approaches within contemporary feminist theory, assist critical disability studies with the intersectional conceptualisation of specific lived experiences, surveillance and (in)visibility regimes, and a more affirmative understanding of identities-in-flux and (reappropriated) labels? In short, can we not only ‘gender’ disability (Smith & Hutchinson, 2004), but also dis/able gender?

We particularly welcome submissions that address the following questions and issues:

  1. The challenges and rewards of interdisciplinary dialogue between gender studies and critical disability studies;
  2. Intersections of gender, dis/ability, and ethnicity/race from a theoretical and/or experiential perspective (e.g., Samuels 2011).
  3. How to study dis/abilities on both an experiential and representational level;
  4. Changes in philosophical, historical (Stiker 1999), and sociological (e.g., Thomas 2007) models of dis/ability;
  5. New materialist, posthumanist, and affective theoretical approaches (e.g., Goodley et al. 2014; Feely 2016);
  6. Changes in terminology within gender studies and critical disability studies (e.g., ‘crip’ as a reappropriated term);
  7. ‘Bodies that are made to (not) matter’, for example in the context of health crises;
  8. The potential of historical studies to generate new theoretical insights on dis/ability and gender (e.g., Rembis 2019);
  9. (Neoliberal) academic spaces, ablebodiedness, normativity and critical pedagogical approaches (including neurodiversity & neurotypicality)
  10.  Dis/ability and the questions of labour and care (i.e., who is supposed to request accommodations; provide care; …)
  11.  Links and tensions between the women’s and disability rights movements, and the role of activism in practices of dis/abling gender (‘everyday activism’)

References used:

  • Bone, K. (2017). Trapped Behind the Glass: Crip theory and Disability Identity. Disability & Society 32(9).
  • Bourke, J. (1996). Dismembering the Male: Men’s Bodies, Britain and the Great War. The University of Chicago Press.
  • Butler, J. (2004). Precarious life: The Powers of Mourning and Violence. Verso.
  • Chen, M. Y. (2012). Animacies: Biopolitics, Racial Mattering, and Queer Affect. Durham University Press.
  • Goodley, D., R. Lawthom, and K. Runswick Cole (2014). Posthuman Disability Studies. Subjectivity 7 (4).
  • Feely, M. (2016). Disability Studies After the Ontological Turn: A Return to the Material World and Material Bodies Without a Return to Essentialism. Disability & Society 31(7).
  • Forestell, Nancy M. (2006). ‘And I Feel Like I’m Dying from Mining for Gold’: Disability, Gender, and the Mining Community, 1920-1950. Labor: Studies in Working-Class History of the Americas 3(3).
  • Kafer, A. (2013). Feminist, Queer, Crip. Indiana University Press.
  • Mingus, M. (2011, February 12). Changing the Framework: Disability Justice: How Our Communities Can Move Beyond Access To Wholeness. Leaving Evidence. https://leavingevidence.wordpress.com/2011/02/12/changing-the-framework-disability-justice/.
  • Nair, A. (2020). ‘These Curly-Bearded, Olive-Skinned Warriors’: Medicine, Prosthetics, Rehabilitation and the Disabled Sepoy in the First World War, 1914-1920. Social History of Medicine 33 (3).
  • Parker, A. M. (2015). Intersecting Histories of Gender, Race, and Disability. Journal of Women’s History 27 (1).
  • Piepzna-Samarasinha, L. L. (2018). Care Work: Dreaming Disability Justice. Arsenal Pulp Press.
  • Meekosha, H., and R. Shuttleworth (2009). What’s so ‘Critical’ about Critical Disability Studies?  Australian Journal of Human Rights 15 (1).
  • Rembis, M. (2019). Challenging the Impairment/Disability Divide: Disability History and the Social Model of Disability. In: N. Watson and S. Vehmas (eds). The Routledge Handbook of Disability Studies, 2nd Edition. Routledge.
  • Rose, S. F. (2017). No Right to be Idle: The Invention of Disability, 1840s-1930s. The University of North Carolina Press.
  • Scully, J. L. (2014). Disability and Vulnerability: On Bodies, Dependence, and Power. In: C. Mackenzie, W. Rogers, and S. Dodds (eds.). Vulnerability: New Essays in Ethics and Feminist Philosophy. Oxford University Press.
  • Samuels, E. (2011). Examining Millie and Christine McKoy: Where Enslavement and Enfreakment Meet. Signs 37 (1).
  • Smith, B. and B. Hutchinson (eds) (2004). Gendering Disability. Rutgers University Press.
  • Stiker, H. J. (1999). A History of Disability. University of Michigan Press.
  • Thomas, C. (2007). Sociologies of Disability and Illness: Contested Ideas in Disability Studies and Medical Sociology. Palgrave Macmillan
  • Tremain, S. (ed.). (2006). Foucault and the Government of Disability. The University of Michigan Press.

About the Journal:

Tijdschrift voor Genderstudies (Journal of Gender Studies) is a Dutch and English language forum for the scientific problematisation of gender in relation to ethnicity, sexuality, class, and age. The journal aims to contribute to debates about gender and diversity in the Netherlands and Flanders. The journal is an interdisciplinary medium operating at the intersection of society, culture, the humanities, health, and science.

Tijdschrift voor Genderstudies (The Journal of Gender Studies) is published by Amsterdam University Press: Tijdschrift voor Genderstudies | Amsterdam University Press (aup.nl)

Guest editors:

Evelien Geerts, University of Birmingham, e.m.l.geerts@bham.ac.uk

Josephine Hoegaerts, University of Helsinki, josephine.hoegaerts@helsinki.fi

Kristien Hens, University of Antwerp, kristien.hens@uantwerpen.be

Daniel Blackie, University of Helsinki, daniel.blackie@helsinki.fi

Preparing your submission:

We invite potential contributors to submit an abstract of 500 words by the 1st of May 2021. The final paper should be 6000 words maximum. Abstracts for traditional scholarly articles should outline the theoretical/praxis-related contribution, method of analysis, and a selection of references (the latter do not have to be included in the word count). Suggestions for non-traditional, critically, and scholarly informed contributions are welcome as well. Please include the contact details of all of the contributors on the abstract document. Abstracts (and manuscripts) can be written in English or Dutch. Please note that the initial acceptance of an abstract does not guarantee publication and that the manuscripts will undergo a double-blind review process. We strive toward diversity among our contributors in terms of career-stage, disciplines, self-identification, and scholarly or activist affiliation. We are happy to accommodate different accessibility needs or diverse styles of communication. Please get in touch with (one of) the editors for any of these issues.

The author(s) should email their abstract proposal as a Word file to all of the guest editors: e.m.l.geerts@bham.ac.uk, josephine.hoegaerts@helsinki.fi, kristien.hens@uantwerpen.be , daniel.blackie@helsinki.fi. For specific questions or more information, contact the guest editors.

Submission timeline:

May, 1, 2021: Abstract submission deadline.

May, 14, 2021: Notification of acceptance/rejection and feedback from the guest editors for accepted abstracts.

August, 14, 2021: Manuscript submission deadline.

August, 14, 2021 – September 14, 2021: Double-blind review process plus feedback from the guest editors.

October, 14, 2021: Full and finalized manuscript submission deadline.

COVID-Calls discussions – Hosted by Scott Gabriel Knowles – every weekday

What IS COVIDCalls? phillymag.com/news/2020/08/1

Live Video on:

YouTube youtube.com/channel/UCgxa_

Twitch twitch.tv/scottknowles

Facebook Live facebook.com/covidcalls1

Periscope pscp.tv/USofDisaster

A selection of some episodes:

COVID-Calls 3.30.2020 Cindy Ermus & Christienna Fryar–pandemics in history

My guests today are disaster historians who understand the global history of pandemic disease. Cindy Ermus is a history professor at UT San Antonio. She specializes in the history of science, medicine, and the environment, especially catastrophe and crisis management, in eighteenth-century France and the Atlantic and Mediterranean Worlds. She’s working on a book titled The Great Plague Scare of 1720: Disaster and Society in the Eighteenth-Century World.

Christienna Fryar is Lecturer in Black British History at Goldsmiths, University of London and she is a historian of modern Britain, the British Empire, and the Modern Caribbean, focusing on Britain’s centuries-long imperial and especially postemancipation entanglements with the Caribbean. She is working on a book titled The Measure of Empire: Disaster and British Imperialism in Postemancipation Jamaica.

COVID-Calls 4.10.2020 Julia Engelschalt & Jacob Remes–history of disaster, pandemic, welfare

Today I talked with two brilliant historians about disaster, disease, and history.

Jacob Remes is a clinical associate professor of history at New York University’s Gallatin School of Individualized Study, where he directs the nascent Initiative for Critical Disaster Studies. He is author of Disaster Citizenship: Survivors, Solidarity, and Power in the Progressive Era (University of Illinois Press, 2016). He is the co-editor, with Andy Horowitz, of the forthcoming Critical Disaster Studies: New Perspectives on Disaster, Vulnerability, Resilience, and Risk.

Julia Engelschalt is currently a doctoral candidate in history at Bielefeld University. She is working on a project titled « Climates, Contagion, and Comparison: American Medicine between Colonial Warfare and the New Public Health, 1898-1925. »

COVIDCalls 6.25.2020 Pandemic History in the Premodern World

Tina Sessa, Merle Eisenberg, Lee Mordechai and Tim.

COVIDCalls 10.5.2020 THE PANDEMIC IN THE ANTHROPOCENE

Bernd Scherer, and Christoph Rosol.

COVIDCalls 5.13.2020 Monica H. Green and Jacob Steere-Williams–pandemics in history

Monica H. Green is an Independent Scholar and an elected Fellow of the Medieval Academy of America. Her work has won book prizes and teaching awards from both the Medieval Academy of America and the History of Science Society. Currently, she is working in two different areas. On the one hand, she continues her work on the intellectual and social history of European medicine in the 11th and 12th centuries, looking at the impact of Arabic medicine on Latin Europe. On the other hand, she is continuing her work on the global histories of the world’s leading infectious diseases, with a particular focus on plague and leprosy. She is bringing out a new edition of her edited volume, Pandemic Disease in the Medieval World: Rethinking the Black Death. And her book, The Black Death: A Global History, is in progress.

Jacob Steere-Williams is an Associate Professor of History at the College of Charleston and an editor with The Journal of the History of Medicine and Allied Sciences. His work centers on the history of public health and the history of disease in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, particularly in Britain and the British Empire. He is the author of the forthcoming (November 2020) The Filth Disease: Typhoid Fever and the Practices of Epidemiology in Victorian England, with the University of Rochester Press. His current book project examines networks and practices of public health in colonial India and South Africa during the Third Plague Pandemic of the late nineteenth and early twentieth century. During the current COVID-19 pandemic his work has been featured on several public forums, including The Post and Courier, CNN, and live webinars for the American Association for the History of Medicine, Princeton, and the Royal College of Physicians.

COVIDCalls 3.3.2021 THE PANDEMIC AND THE HISTORY OF MUTUAL AID

Daniel Joslyn and Tyesha Maddox.

COVIDCalls 2.22.2021 THE HISTORY OF PLAGUE: NEW PERSPECTIVES

Monica Green, and Tunahan Durnaz.

COVIDCalls 1.25.2021 THE PANDEMIC AND THE HISTORY OF MEDICINE

Jacob Steere-Williams, and Deborah Levine.

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yA1KgXEFZ2c

New publication – Mirator Vol 2020-2 (2021): Disability in the Medieval Nordic World, Edited by Christopher Crocker.

Mirator is a multilingual peer-reviewed electronic journal devoted to medieval studies. It is published by Glossa, the Society for Medieval Studies in Finland.

Published: 2021-03-12
 

Articles

 

Open acces edition and more information on the Mirator Journal website.