Meeting – Workshop – The All-seeing eye? Vision and Eyesight Across Time and Cultures Workshop, 2018

The All-seeing eye?

Vision and Eyesight Across Time and Cultures Workshop, 2018

Wed 11 April 2018 – 09:30 – 17:00

 

A call for papers has been issued for this workshop which will explore medical, social, and cultural meanings of the eye and vision in contemporary and historical perspective. Vision has often provoked fascination within societies and cultures as the most revered sense. In Western Europe, the eye has been viewed scientifically as the most ‘exquisite’ organ, or spiritually as a ‘window to the soul’. These positions have had an influence on how the eye has been perceived, both as a vital organ and, by implication, one that needed to be protected. Whilst the eye could bring delight to its holder, and be symbolic in a variety of ways, it could also, when lost, incur significant impairment. The workshop will explore this vision impairment and correction, and the extent to which sight loss has been stigmatised. It will welcome papers that explore eyesight and its meanings across time and place, to encourage trans-historical and interdisciplinary discussion

 

Programme :

9.30am Registration 

10am Panel One

Dr Corinne Doria, Paris 1-Pantheon-Sorbonne University; University of Milan, ‘Defining Normal Vision. Eye charts in 19th Century Europe’

Dr Andy Flack, University of Bristol, ‘Vision and touch in the depths of the Mammoth Cave’

Dr Deborah Ellen Thorpe, Trinity College, Dublin, ‘“Mynde, ye, and hand”: A palaeographical approach to medieval eyesight deterioration’

First Break

11.45-12.45 Keynote

Professor Graeme Gooday, ‘Beyond the visual: alternatives to ocularcentric histories of bodies and technologies’

Lunch

 1.45pm Panel Two

 Dr Ben Curtis, University of Wolverhampton, ‘‘The dread now prevailing’: Miners’ Nystagmus in the South Wales Coalfield in the Early Twentieth Century’,

Dr Karen Beauchamp-Pyror, Honorary Research Fellow, College of Human and Health Sciences, Swansea University, ‘Losses and gains: the impact of regaining and restoring vision’

Dr Michelle Carr, College of Human and Health Sciences, Swansea University, ‘Seeing in Your Dreams’

Second Break

3.30pm Panel Three

 Colin Harding, AHRC CDP Candidate, Imperial War Museum and University of Brighton, ‘Repairing War’s Ravages: Horace Nicholls’ photographs of prosthetic masks’

Iain Riddell, PhD Student, University of Leicester, School of Media, Communication & Sociology (Member of the Science Advisory Committee for the Childhood Cancer Trust, 2015-2018), ‘Making a beginning Retinoblastoma in adulthood, psycho-social contexts and imperatives’

4.45-5pm Wrap up the Day

Contact Information:

Gemma.Almond@sciencemuseum.ac.uk or Gemma.Almond@swansea.ac.uk

More infos on their website

New book – Intellectual disability. A conceptual history, 1200–1900, Edited by Dr Patrick McDonagh, C. F. Goodey and Timothy Stainton

Intellectual disability. A conceptual history, 1200–1900
Edited by Dr Patrick McDonagh, C. F. Goodey and Timothy Stainton
Publisher: Manchester University Press
Format: Hardcover

This collection explores the historical origins of our modern concepts of intellectual or learning disability. The essays, from some of the leading historians of ideas of intellectual disability, focus on British and European material from the Middle Ages to the late-nineteenth century and extend across legal, educational, literary, religious, philosophical and psychiatric histories. They investigate how precursor concepts and discourses were shaped by and interacted with their particular social, cultural and intellectual environments, eventually giving rise to contemporary ideas. The collection is essential reading for scholars interested in the history of intelligence, intellectual disability and related concepts, as well as in disability history generally.
Published Date: January 2018
Pages: 296
ISBN: 978-1-5261-2531-6
More infos on the editor website

CFP – Society for the Social History of Medicine Conference 2018 – Conformity, Resistance, Dialogue and Deviance in Health and Medicine Liverpool, 11-13 July 2018.

Society for the Social History of Medicine Conference 2018

Conformity, Resistance, Dialogue and Deviance in Health and Medicine

Liverpool, 11-13 July 2018

Hosted by The Centre for the Humanities and Social Sciences of Health, Medicine and Technology

The Society for the Social History of Medicine hosts a major, biennial, international, and interdisciplinary conference, and from 11-13 July 2018 it will meet in Liverpool to explore the theme of ‘Conformity, Resistance, Dialogue and Deviance in Health and Medicine’.

This broad theme plays on several levels. It reflects local Liverpool health heritage as a site of public health innovation; independent and at times radical approaches to health politics, health inequalities, health determinants, treatment and therapies (including technological innovation, community and collective practices, and the use of arts in health).

Call for Papers

Upcoming SSHM Events

The Society for the Social History of Medicine hosts a major biennial, international, and interdisciplinary conference. From 11-13 July 2018 it will meet in Liverpool to explore the theme of ‘Conformity, Resistance, Dialogue and Deviance in Health and Medicine’.

This broad theme plays on several levels. It reflects local Liverpool health heritage as a site of public health innovation; independent and at times radical approaches to health politics, health inequalities, health determinants, treatment and therapies (including technological innovation, community and collective practices, and the use of arts in health).

We envisage that this conference theme will also stimulate participants to think about how medical orthodoxy has been shaped and re-molded, and how patients and practitioners choose to conform to conventional practices, seek alternatives, resist or compromise. The theme further facilitates a transnational conference strand, examining the construction of, and attitudes towards, Western and other medical traditions and health systems. In light of this theme, the 2018 conference committee encourages papers, sessions, round-tables and other interventions that examine, challenge, and refine histories of conformity, resistance, dialogue and deviance in medicine and health. These might be set in relation to inclusions, exclusions and injustices; insiders, outsiders and mediators; peoples, places and cultures; and diverse and expanding new social histories of health and medicine.

But the biennial conference is not exclusive in terms of its theme, and reflects the diversity of the discipline of the social history of medicine. Proposals that consider all topics relevant to histories of health and medicine broadly conceived are invited. Nor are submissions restricted to any area of study: we welcome a range of disciplinary approaches, time periods and geographical contexts. Submissions from scholars across the range of career stages are most welcome, and especially from postgraduate and early career researchers.

Possible topics include:

  • Health and medicine in colonial, postcolonial and transnational contexts
  • The political economy of health and medicine
  • Theories and practices of conformity and deviancy in health and medicine
  • New ways of framing working within the social history of medicine
  • Radical politics and resistance to dominant medical knowledge and practice
  • Critical theory and social movements such as feminist, postcolonial, disability and queer theory and activism in relation to health and medicine
  • Relations between different cultures of health and medicine
  • Inequalities of health and medical care
  • Public health
  • The environment and health
  • Animals, disease and health
  • Work and health
  • Arts and health
  • Popular representations of health and medicine

Individual submissions should include a 250 word abstract, including five key words and a one paragraph CV/resume with contact information.
Panel submissions should include three papers (each with a 250 word abstract, including five key words and a short CV), a chair, and a 100-word panel abstract.
Round table submissions should include the names of four participants (each with a short CV), a chair, a 500-word abstract and five key words.
We also invite poster presentations, short films and ideas for new sessions.

Deadline for Proposals
Friday 2 February 2018
sshm2018@liverpool.ac.uk

Bursaries

The Society offers bursaries to assist students in meeting the financial costs of attending the conference. Find out more and how to apply here.

New book – Prosthesis in Medieval and Early Modern Culture – Edited by Chloe Porter, Katie L. Walter, Margaret Healy

Prosthesis in Medieval and Early Modern Culture

Edited by Chloe Porter, Katie L. Walter, Margaret Healy

2018 Routledge

Description by the editor :

« ‘Prosthesis’ denotes a rhetorical ‘addition’ to a pre-existing ‘beginning’, a ‘replacement’ for that which is ‘defective or absent’, a technological mode of ‘correction’ that reveals a history of corporeal and psychic discontent. Recent scholarship has given weight to these multiple meanings of ‘prosthesis’ as tools of analysis for literary and cultural criticism. The study of pre-modern prosthesis, however, often registers as an absence in contemporary critical discourse.

This collection seeks to redress this omission, reconsidering the history of prosthesis and its implications for contemporary critical responses to, and uses of, it. The book demonstrates the significance of notions of prosthesis in medieval and early modern theological debate, Reformation controversy, and medical discourse and practice. It also tracks its importance for imaginings of community and of the relationship of self and other, as performed on the stage, expressed in poetry, charms, exemplary and devotional literature, and as fought over in the documents of religious and cultural change. Interdisciplinary in nature, the book engages with contemporary critical and cultural theory and philosophy, genre theory, literary history, disability studies, and medical humanities, establishing prosthesis as a richly productive analytical tool in the pre-modern, as well as the modern, context. This book was originally published as a special issue of the Textual Practice journal. »

More infos on the editor website !