New publication – Book – Viewing Disability in Medieval Spanish Texts by Connie L. Scarborough.

Viewing Disability in Medieval Spanish Texts

by Connie L. Scarborough.

Amsterdam University Press,

Series: Premodern Health, Disease, and Disability

Description by the editor :

« This book is one of the first to examine medieval Spanish canonical works for their portrayals of disability in relationship to theological teachings, legal precepts, and medical knowledge. Connie L. Scarborough shows that physical impairments were seen differently through each lens. Theology at times taught that the disabled were « marked by God, » their sins rendered on their bodies; at other times, they were viewed as important objects of Christian charity. The disabled often suffered legal restrictions, allowing them to be viewed with other distinctive groups, such as the ill or the poor. And from a medical point of view, a miraculous cure could be seen as evidence of divine intervention. This book explores all these perspectives through medieval Spain’s miracle narratives, hagiographies, didactic tales, and epic poetry.  »

 

Table of Contents
Acknowledgements 9
Introduction: Disability Theory and Pre-Modern Considerations
Disability Theories: Definitions and Limitations
Adapting Disability Studies for the Pre-Modern Era
The Role of the Church and Christian Beliefs
Disability Studies and Literary Texts
Goals and Organization

1 Lameness – Los Contrechos 
Definitions and Theories
Legal Status
Historical and Pseudo-Scientific Accounts
Work and Occupational Hazards
Mobility Devices
Divine Punishment
Ridicule and Example
The Monstrous

2 Blindness – Los Ciegos 
Medieval Theories of Sight
Causes for Loss of Sight
Religious Beliefs
Begging and Charity
Blinding as Judicial Punishment
Blinding as Divine Punishment
Self-Blinding
Comic Potential

3 Deafness and Inability to Speak – Los Sordomudos 
Deaf vs. deaf
Legal status
Cures (?)
Popular Refrains and Wisdom Literature
Spiritual Autobiography/Pathography/Consolation
Loss of Speech

4 Leprosy – Los Gafos 
Medical Knowledge
Segregation (?)
The Leper as Metaphor
Leprosy as Divine Punishment
Leper as Holy Messenger
Leper as Figure in Religious History
Leprosy and ‘Tests of Friendship’

5 Cured by the Grace of God – Los Milagros 
The Medieval Concept of Miracle
Miracle Accounts
Missing Limbs
Lameness and Paralysis
Multiple Impairments
Blindness
Deafness and Inability to Speak
Leprosy
Interdependence of Disability and Divine Cure

6 Conclusions 
Works Cited
Index

 

More infos on the editor website.

New publication – Premodern Dis/ability history. A Companion – Didymos pub.

Cordula Nolte, Bianca Frohne, Uta Halle, Sonja Kerth (Eds): A Handbook of Pre-Modern Dis/ability History (Didymos)

 

 

Pre-order here

 

Covering the period from 500 to 1800, this volume serves as a comprehensive guide into the growing field of dis/ability history. Its contributions by 80 international scholars present groundbreaking research in various historical disciplines, often unearthing hitherto unknown material and highlighting premodern societies from unfamiliar perspectives. The wide range of approaches and subjects comprises theoretical and methodological frameworks, general questions of gender, life-cycle and social status, daily life experiences,work and sustenance, legal norms and practices, strategies of coping and of self-help, medical therapies, organisation of care, emotions and religious interpretations. Compact information, vivid case studies and rich visual material grant an enjoyable and instructive reading for audiences who wish to explore premodern culture on innovative paths. »

 

Since the turn of the century, dis/ability history has been established as a promising, international field of research that enables us to look at historical cultures and societies from a completely new point of view, based on the analytical category of dis/ability. The number of relevant projects and publications is growing, methods and topics are in constant development. At the same time, various intersections with different current approaches within historical scholarship and cultural studies emerge. The combination of these aspects turns the attention of the academia and the wider public to this new research perspective. »
However, there is hardly any information available about the self-conception of dis/ability history, about its theories, methods and sources, and about its specific aims, subjects and leading questions. Whereas international dis/ability studies, which laid the groundwork for dis/ability history, have already put forth several handbooks, introductions and readers, dis/ability history is still in need of reference works wherein its basics are presented in a concise, readable, and systematic fashion.
This deficit is especially noticeable with regard to pre-modern dis/ability history, which is even more recent than modern dis/ability history, and where particular challenges have to be met, mainly due to the specifics of medieval and early modern sources. As there has been considerable output within a growing number of essays and edited volumes, but not often in form of monographs yet, it is quite difficult to keep track of research activities and to gain advanced insight into central fields of research.

This is where our handbook comes in. It addresses a diverse audience, including students and renowned scholars as well as interest groups, activists within the fields of politics, culture, education and social work who advocate empowerment and work towards social inclusion, as well as the general public with an interest in history.
The handbook aims to present the current state of research with regard to various disciplines, combining concise information with an accessible presentation based on primary sources and an arrangement of topics that captivates the reader’s interest.

The handbook

  • values interdisciplinarity: topics will be addressed by various disciplines, especially history, literary studies and linguistics, archaeology, anthropology, art history, sociology, religious studies, and theology.
  • brings together international authors (about 80 contributors).
  • is based on primary sources throughout.
  • explicitly addresses controversies regarding different research tendencies and methodologies.
  • combines diachronic and synchronic perspectives, applying a perspective of longue durée whenever possible.
  • entails articles in English and German (the latter being accompanied by English summaries).

 

Didymos-Verlag

Lange Straße 11 · D-71563 Affalterbach

Postfach 11 08 · D-71561 Affalterbach

Tel +49 71 44 › 26 11 791 · Fax +49 71 44 › 26 11 792

für Bestellungen / for orders

info@didymos-verlag.de · www.didymos-verlag.de

More infos on the Homo debilis Creative Unite website

Demons and Illness from Antiquity to the Early-Modern Period

Demons and Illness from Antiquity to the Early-Modern Period

Edited by Siam Bhayro and Catherine Rider, University of Exeter, Brill edition.

Table of contents

Introduction, Siam Bhayro and Catherine Rider
Antiquity
Shifting Alignments: The Dichotomy of Benevolent and Malevolent Demons in Mesopotamia, Gina Konstantopoulos
The Natural and Supernatural Aspects of Fever in Mesopotamian Medical Texts, András Bácksay
Illness as Divine Punishment: The Nature and Function of the Disease-Carrier Demons in the Ancient Egyptian Magical Texts, Rita Lucarelli
Demons at Work in Ancient Mesopotamia, Lorenzo Verderame
Late Antiquity
Demons and Illness in Second Temple Judaism: Theory and Practice, Ida Fröhlich
Illness and Healing through Spell and Incantation in the Dead Sea Scrolls, David Hamidović
Conceptualizing Demons in Late Antique Judaism, Gideon Bohak
Oneiric Aggressive Magic: Sleep Disorders in Late Antique Jewish Tradition, Alessia Bellusci
The Influence of Demons on the Human Mind According to Athenagoras and Tatian, Chiara Crosignani
Demonic Anti-Music and Spiritual Disorder in the Life of Antony, Sophie Sawicka-Sykes
Over-eating Demoniacs in Late Antique Hagiography, Sophie Lunn-Rockliffe
Medieval
Miracles and Madness: Dispelling Demons in Twelfth-Century Hagiography, Anne E. Bailey
Demons in Lapidaries? The Evidence of the Madrid MS Escorial, h. I. 15., Carolina Escobar-Vargas
The Melancholy of the Necromancer in Arnau de Vilanova’s Epistle against Demonic Magic, Sebastià Giralt
Demons, Illness and Spiritual Aids in Natural Magic and Image Magic, Lauri Ockenström
Between Medicine and Magic: Spiritual Aetiology and Therapeutics in Medieval Islam, Liana Saif
Demons, Saints, and the Mad in the Twelfth-Century Miracles of Thomas Becket, Claire Trenery
Early Modernity
The Post-Reformation Challenge to Demonic Possession, Harman Bhogal
From A Discoverie to The Triall of Witchcraft: Doctor Cotta and Godly John, Pierre Kapitaniak
Healing with Demons? Preternatural Philosophy and Superstitious Cures in Spanish Inquisitorial Courts, Bradley J. Mollmann
Afterword: Pandaemonium, Peregrine Horden

 

New book publication – Religions et handicap Interdit, péché, symbole – Henri-Jacques STIKER

Religions et handicap

Interdit, péché, symbole – analyse anthropologique

STIKER Henri-Jacques

hjs

Présentation:

La perception que nous avons du handicap et la place que la société dans son ensemble se doit d’accorder aux personnes affectées de handicaps est une question qui suscite bien des débats. Mais qu’en disent les religions, qu’elles soient de tradition écrite ou orale ? Cet ouvrage se propose d’examiner les rapports que celles-ci entretiennent aux diverses formes d’infirmité : quelles représentations, quels discours se dégagent-ils des textes fondateurs, mais aussi des mythes et des différentes pratiques religieuses ? De la boiterie de Jacob au bégaiement de Moïse, de la folie de Saül aux corps problématiques de Muhammad ou Bouddha, en passant par les peurs ancestrales et le malaise souvent afférent, les représentations de l’infirmité, avec les traitements qui s’ensuivent, ne se comprennent que par le lien avec le type de divinités ou d’esprits dont les religions se dotent. Tout à tour péché, interdit, signe de malédiction, ou parfois encore, à l’opposé, symbole d’une cause élevée, l’infirmité revêt différentes significations relevant de la complexité et de la spécifité propre à chaque religion. Si le rapport au handicap d’une religion donnée n’est pas généralisable à la société dont elle émane, celui-ci, en revanche, est ici l’occasion d’examiner selon un biais inédit les grandes théories de la religion.

 

Auteur:

Henri-Jacques Stiker est docteur en philosophie, HDR au laboratoire « Identités, cultures, territoires » (Paris VII). Il a tenu un séminaire annuel et dirigé des thèses sur l’anthropologie historique de l’infirmité. Il a publié divers ouvrages sur le sujet et est rédacteur en chef de Alter, European Journal of Disability Research.

 

ISBN 9782705693428 32,00 €

More info on the editor website

New publication – Coming soon : « Living with Disfigurement in Early Medieval Europe » by Patricia Skinner

51704299

Living with Disfigurement in Early Medieval Europe

by Patricia Skinner

This book examines social and medical responses to the disfigured face in early medieval Europe, arguing that the study of head and facial injuries can offer a new contribution to the history of early medieval medicine and culture, as well as exploring the language of violence and social interactions. Despite the prevalence of warfare and conflict in early medieval society, and a veritable industry of medieval historians studying it, there has in fact been very little attention paid to the subject of head wounds and facial damage in the course of war and/or punitive justice. The impact of acquired disfigurement —for the individual, and for her or his family and community—is barely registered, and only recently has there been any attempt to explore the question of how damaged tissue and bone might be treated medically or surgically. In the wake of new work on disability and the emotions in the medieval period, this study documents how acquired disfigurement is recorded across different geographical and chronological contexts in the period.

About the author: Patricia Skinner is Research Professor in Arts and Humanities at Swansea University, UK. She is the Director of the Effaced from History project, sponsored by the Wellcome Trust, and has previously published books on gender, medicine, and health, in addition to the social history of southern Italy.

Review (on the ditor website): “In this uncommonly refreshing contribution to the vibrant historical discourse on marginalisation, Skinner engages with current concerns beyond her chronological and thematic focus, while eschewing anachronism and reductionism. With ample evidence and spirited argument, she challenges widespread generalisations about past attitudes—and exposes persistent prejudices—towards the physically different.” (Luke Demaitre, Visiting Professor, Center for Biomedical Ethics and Humanities, University of Virginia, and author of “Leprosy in Premodern Medicine: A Malady of the Whole Body”)

Table of contents

 

  • Introduction: Writing and Reading About Medieval Disfigurement

  • The Face, Honor and “Face”

  • Disfigurement, Authority and the Law

  • Stigma and Disfigurement: Putting on a Brave Face?

  • Defacing Women: The Gendering of Disfigurement

 

 

More infos on the editor’s website