CFP – ‘Objects, Extensions, Prosthetics: The Body and Subjectivity in the Pre-Modern Period’ – 28th Feb 2018 – Newcastle University.

Objects, Extensions, Prosthetics: The Body and Subjectivity in the Pre-Modern Period

Wednesday 28th February 2018, 1-6pm Newcastle University.

We invite postgraduates and early career researchers based in the North to give short (15 minute) talks at an afternoon seminar event on Wednesday 28th February 2018. This event will include a key note from Professor Helen Smith (University of York) in response to the talks given and a group discussion of the topics to close, as well as a free lunch included. The seminar will focus on how objects function as extensions of the self the medieval and early modern period. Can objects be sites of emotional or literary expression? Do they reflect pre-modern notions vi interior/exterior selves? Can they be considered as Metonymic’ substitutions for the self? We invite PGRs/ECRs to present on this theme a, well as partake in group discussions over the course of the afternoon. Topics might include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • The body (skin, hair)
  • Fashion (clothing, textiles)
  • Prosthetics
  • Books (print., literary or personal, notebooks)
  • Stage props (/object and costumes)
  • Household items
  • Religious/sacred objects

If you would like to get involved with this seminar event and give a short paper, please send an expression of interest along with topic details (no more than 200 words) no later than 15thJanuary 2018. and/or any queries. to Emily Rowe – e.c.rowe2@newcastle.ac.uk


Publié par

Ninon Dubourg (sharing info)

Ninon Dubourg is a current PhD candidate researcher in medieval history at the University of Paris Diderot - Paris 7, France. Her research interests include the laical and clerical physical impairments and disability in Medieval Europe (XII – XIV C), based on the petition and papal letters conserved in the Papal Archives of the Archivum Secretum Vaticanum. This kind of ecclesiastical document offers us a significant insight into the Church's comprehension of the social experience of disability. Disabled clerics had to ask the Pope for dispensation to contravene canon law - with regard to income or religious practices – necessitated by the circumstances of their disability. Papal dispensation letters, written in answer to such petitions, offered the cleric a number of ways out, from dispensation to pension, including resignation, in connection with the pope's administration and the potestas the Church had to solve this issues. The real lived experiences of a disabled cleric had to be reformulated in the petition in order to allow the Church to recognise his disability, and thus for him to receive papal grace. Working on many relative questions, she likes to approach new topics as disabled identity, medieval masculinities, medicine in the Middle Ages, biblical studies, canon law, medieval linguistic and so on. (https://univ-paris-diderot.academia.edu/NinonDubourg) She also teach Methodology to first year and Master degree and Medieval History at the University Paris Diderot - Paris 7 as ATER (temporary attaché). She is also a foreign associate member of the research network "Homo Debilis" at the Bremen University (http://www.homo-debilis.de/personen/index-en.html). Also member of the réseau jeunes chercheurs Handicap(s) et Sociétés, Programme Handicaps et Sociétés - EHESS, Paris. She is also in charge of the research blog History of Disease, Disability & Medicine in Medieval Europe, with the aim to promote this filed of research in France and in Europe and will make sure to share latest publishing events, future meeting (such as conference, colloquium, round table), and to relay call for paper or contribution on disability in pre-modern societies, with particular focus on Middle Ages. (https://dishist.hypotheses.org/) Ninon Dubourg est doctorante ATER en histoire médiévale à l'Université Paris Diderot – Paris 7, laboratoire ICT (Identité, Culture et Territoire, EA 337). Ses recherches sont menées sous la direction de Didier Lett (Université Paris Diderot – Paris 7) et de Julien Théry (Université Lumière Lyon 2). Ancienne allocataire chargée d'un mission d'enseignement (École Doctorale Économies, Espaces, Sociétés, Civilisations, ED 382) et boursière de l’École Française de Rome (Novembre 2014), son travail de thèse s'intitule « Handicap et infirmité clérical et laïque dans les suppliques et lettres pontificales de l'Europe médiévale (xiie – xive siècle) ». Ninon cherche dans son travail de thèse à questionner l'intégration de personnes infirmes dans le clergé et dans la société laïque ainsi que l'utilité que retire l’Église à aller contre les lois relatives à l'incapacité physique qu'elle a elle même édicté. Les sources qu'elle utilise, issues des registres de suppliques et de lettres des Archives secrètes du Vatican, entre normes et pratiques, permettent de voir comment la personne handicapée, clerc ou laïque, compte sur l'institution dont elle fait partie pour encadrer sa vie – et inversement, de capter le regard que pose l'institution sur ces personnes. Elle est aussi membre associée au réseau de recherche "Homo Debilis" de l'Université de Brême (Allemagne) (http://www.homo-debilis.de/personen/index-en.html). Aussi membre du réseau jeunes chercheurs Handicap(s) et Sociétés, Programme Handicaps et Sociétés - EHESS, Paris (http://phs.ehess.fr/?page_id=402). Elle est aussi gestionnaire du carnet de recherche hypothèse sur L'histoire du handicap, des maladies et de la médecine dans l'Europe médiévale. Son carnet souhaite promouvoir ce champ de recherche en France et en Europe et propose de veiller à partager les nouveautés éditoriales, les futures rencontres (conférences, colloque, journées d'études, tables ronde), mais aussi de relayer les appels à communication ou à contribution du handicap dans les sociétés pré-modernes, en se focalisant particulièrement sur l'époque médiévale. (https://dishist.hypotheses.org/)

Laisser un commentaire

Votre adresse de messagerie ne sera pas publiée. Les champs obligatoires sont indiqués avec *

Ce site utilise Akismet pour réduire les indésirables. En savoir plus sur comment les données de vos commentaires sont utilisées.