CFP – Law and (Dis)Order – theme on Desire, Disability, Disorder at The Forty-Fourth Annual Sewanee Medieval Colloquium

Theme: Law and (Dis)Order

The Forty-Fourth Annual Sewanee Medieval Colloquium  April 13-14, 2018 – The University of the South, Sewanee, TN.

The Sewanee Medieval Colloquium invites papers exploring aspects of law, order, disorder and resistance in all aspects of medieval cultures. This includes legal codes, social order, orthodoxy and heterodoxy, poetic or artistic form, gender construction, racial divisions, scientific and philosophical order, the history of popular rebellion, and other ways of conceptualizing our theme.

Papers should be twenty minutes in length, and commentary is traditionally provided for each paper presented. We invite papers from all disciplines, and encourage contributions from medievalists working on any geographic area. A seminar will also seek contributions; please look for its separate CFP soon. Participants in the Colloquium are generally limited to holders of a Ph.D. and those currently in a Ph.D. program.

Please submit an abstract (approx. 250 words) and brief c.v., via our website (http://medievalcolloquium.sewanee.edu), no later than 26 October 2017. If you wish to propose a session, please submit abstracts and vitae for all participants in the session. Completed papers, including notes, will be due no later than 13 March 2018.

Prospective participants are invited to apply to propose complete panels of two or three papers, apply to the general call, or apply to panel sub-themes, which appear below. Papers not taken by sub-themes will be considered for the general call.

Sub-Theme:

Desire, Disability, Disorder

Organizer: Matthew Giancarlo, University of Kentucky (matthew.giancarlo@uky.edu)

This session will explore the intersection of forms of disability with artistic and legal discourses about desire and social order: erotic, familial, political. How is “disability” framed as both limiting and enabling, as seen from different speaking positions? What kind of alternative orders are visible from —or lisible through— “disordered” bodies? How does the imaginative representation of a handicap either fulfill or frustrate different kinds of desires? These questions and others will be considered, from different historical perspectives and in light of the growing body of research on medieval disability and the law. Paper proposals dealing with specific authors and texts are encouraged.

 

More infos on the organisator’s website !


Publié par

Ninon Dubourg (sharing info)

Ninon Dubourg is a current PhD candidate researcher in medieval history at the University of Paris Diderot - Paris 7, France. Her research interests include the laical and clerical physical impairments and disability in Medieval Europe (XII – XIV C), based on the petition and papal letters conserved in the Papal Archives of the Archivum Secretum Vaticanum. This kind of ecclesiastical document offers us a significant insight into the Church's comprehension of the social experience of disability. Disabled clerics had to ask the Pope for dispensation to contravene canon law - with regard to income or religious practices – necessitated by the circumstances of their disability. Papal dispensation letters, written in answer to such petitions, offered the cleric a number of ways out, from dispensation to pension, including resignation, in connection with the pope's administration and the potestas the Church had to solve this issues. The real lived experiences of a disabled cleric had to be reformulated in the petition in order to allow the Church to recognise his disability, and thus for him to receive papal grace. Working on many relative questions, she likes to approach new topics as disabled identity, medieval masculinities, medicine in the Middle Ages, biblical studies, canon law, medieval linguistic and so on. (https://univ-paris-diderot.academia.edu/NinonDubourg) She also teach Methodology to first year and Master degree and Medieval History at the University Paris Diderot - Paris 7 as ATER (temporary attaché). She is also a foreign associate member of the research network "Homo Debilis" at the Bremen University (http://www.homo-debilis.de/personen/index-en.html). Also member of the réseau jeunes chercheurs Handicap(s) et Sociétés, Programme Handicaps et Sociétés - EHESS, Paris. She is also in charge of the research blog History of Disease, Disability & Medicine in Medieval Europe, with the aim to promote this filed of research in France and in Europe and will make sure to share latest publishing events, future meeting (such as conference, colloquium, round table), and to relay call for paper or contribution on disability in pre-modern societies, with particular focus on Middle Ages. (https://dishist.hypotheses.org/) Ninon Dubourg est doctorante ATER en histoire médiévale à l'Université Paris Diderot – Paris 7, laboratoire ICT (Identité, Culture et Territoire, EA 337). Ses recherches sont menées sous la direction de Didier Lett (Université Paris Diderot – Paris 7) et de Julien Théry (Université Lumière Lyon 2). Ancienne allocataire chargée d'un mission d'enseignement (École Doctorale Économies, Espaces, Sociétés, Civilisations, ED 382) et boursière de l’École Française de Rome (Novembre 2014), son travail de thèse s'intitule « Handicap et infirmité clérical et laïque dans les suppliques et lettres pontificales de l'Europe médiévale (xiie – xive siècle) ». Ninon cherche dans son travail de thèse à questionner l'intégration de personnes infirmes dans le clergé et dans la société laïque ainsi que l'utilité que retire l’Église à aller contre les lois relatives à l'incapacité physique qu'elle a elle même édicté. Les sources qu'elle utilise, issues des registres de suppliques et de lettres des Archives secrètes du Vatican, entre normes et pratiques, permettent de voir comment la personne handicapée, clerc ou laïque, compte sur l'institution dont elle fait partie pour encadrer sa vie – et inversement, de capter le regard que pose l'institution sur ces personnes. Elle est aussi membre associée au réseau de recherche "Homo Debilis" de l'Université de Brême (Allemagne) (http://www.homo-debilis.de/personen/index-en.html). Aussi membre du réseau jeunes chercheurs Handicap(s) et Sociétés, Programme Handicaps et Sociétés - EHESS, Paris (http://phs.ehess.fr/?page_id=402). Elle est aussi gestionnaire du carnet de recherche hypothèse sur L'histoire du handicap, des maladies et de la médecine dans l'Europe médiévale. Son carnet souhaite promouvoir ce champ de recherche en France et en Europe et propose de veiller à partager les nouveautés éditoriales, les futures rencontres (conférences, colloque, journées d'études, tables ronde), mais aussi de relayer les appels à communication ou à contribution du handicap dans les sociétés pré-modernes, en se focalisant particulièrement sur l'époque médiévale. (https://dishist.hypotheses.org/)

Laisser un commentaire

Votre adresse de messagerie ne sera pas publiée. Les champs obligatoires sont indiqués avec *