Seminar – Uncommon Bodies – « The Trajectories of Early Modern Disability Studies » ; Simone Chess, “Hacking Sex in the Renaissance.” Lindsey Row-Heyveld, “Careless Arden: Able-bodiedness in As You Like It.” – 10-12 Feb 2021 – Event Free on Zoom

 
Uncommon Bodies: CSPW/CEMH Event
 
Please join us for two Uncommon Bodies events on disability studies and early modern sexuality, featuring Lindsey Row-Heyveld and Simone Chess


If you’re thinking you that you may come, we would like to know! Even if you ultimately can’t make it, we want to ensure that accommodations are available for you. So please RSVP.

When: Wed. Feb. 10, 2021 — Behind-the-scenes methods talk (11AM-12:30 PM CST)
and Friday, Feb. 12, 2021 Double header! (12- 1:30 PM CST)
Where: Zoom (please RSVP for link or check on the Center for Early Modern History UMN site)
Who: This event is free and open to the public, and to anyone who might be interested in disability studies, disability community, and early modern scholarship

Feb 10:
« The Trajectories of Early Modern Disability Studies »
Topics include: what brought us each to early modern disability studies? Where was early modern disability studies when we first met and first began this work? What has changed, in the field and in our own thinking? Where do we see gaps or space for growth? How did we pick the topics we’ll be talking about as models for what might be coming next in the field?


Feb. 12:
These talks approach the question of what might come next in early modern disability studies from two very different angles: Lindsey Row-Heyveld’s work on able-bodiedness and inattention explores a disability studies that could help us understand the construction of normalcy, modeling ways that disability knowledges apply broadly outside of the usual canon of early modern disability texts, while Simone Chess’s work on adaptive sex practices experiments with a disability studies centered in embodiment, modeling an increased specificity about disabled practices in history. Despite these very different approaches, the papers dovetail in their shared commitment to envisioning a capacious, creative, and multi-vocal future for early modern disability studies.

Simone Chess, “Hacking Sex in the Renaissance.”
Lindsey Row-Heyveld, “Careless Arden: Able-bodiedness in As You Like It.”
 
 

Laisser un commentaire

Votre adresse e-mail ne sera pas publiée. Les champs obligatoires sont indiqués avec *

Ce site utilise Akismet pour réduire les indésirables. En savoir plus sur comment les données de vos commentaires sont utilisées.