Call for Papers: Experiencing the material body in early modern Europe – Stockholm University, October 7-9, 2020

Call for Papers: Experiencing the material body in early modern Europe

Datum: 31 mars 2020
Plats: Deadline for proposals
Call for papers to a conference held at Stockholm University, October 7-9, 2020.

 

 
Image from Hieronymus Bock, Kreutterbuch, courtesy of the The Hagströmer Medico-Historical Library.

Key-note speakers

Sasha Handley (Manchester)
Craig Koslofsky (Illinois)
Maren Lorenz (Ruhr Universität Bochum)

In the early modern world, society, monarchy and the family were understood in the form of corporeal metaphors. The body was also the site of conflicts over life and death, sin and redemption, and the object of severe punishment and domination. Simultaneously, the period saw rapid change: the European expansion heightened tensions over the body and its transformation in relation to foreign lands, foods and peoples. Mechanical conceptions of the body as a tool governed by the mind, and insistence on the senses as the prime source of knowledge emerged in scientific research and reached a broader audience. Within this context, the body in early modernity is oftentimes described as porous, malleable and in flux. Climate, food, objects, and social interaction are all described as having had corporeal effects, from the changing of skin tones, the movement of bodily fluids, to the honing of performance to suit social and gender roles. From wherever we look, it seems that early modern people’s bodies were under significant pressure from outward influences, as well as from their own ambitions to control them. Using approaches like embodiment, performance, sensory and cognitive history, history of emotions, material culture and history of medicine, scholars have investigated various forms of corporeal experience. This workshop seeks to bring together these interlinked fields in order to reflect upon the lived-in body in early modern Europe.

We aim to draw together research from various fields to consider the status of the material body in relation to its surroundings, to gauge the significance of the various ways it was influenced externally and internally, and to better understand how early modern people of different gender, class, creed and ethnicity understood bodies to work. The workshop will engage with the body within a wide range of contexts, from the profound relationships between the macro- and microcosms, to everyday experience like work, eating and sex. We will consider the body as willed and cultivated, but also highlight the body’s vulnerabilities and propensity to sometimes do unforeseen things.

Information

Abstracts of circa 250 words are invited for papers of 20 minutes to be delivered at the workshop in  Stockholm. Send together with short CV to:  matbod@historia.su.se

Deadline for proposals: March 31, 2020.

All costs for travel and accommodation will be covered for presenters.

For more information, contact Karin Sennefelt, karin.sennefelt@historia.su.se.

Organizers

The workshop is organized by the project The Word made Flesh: The Body in Lutheran Culture, 1600-1750 at the Department of History, Stockholm University and funded by the Swedish Research Council and Riksbankens Jubileumsfond.

More information on the organisator website.


Laisser un commentaire

Votre adresse de messagerie ne sera pas publiée. Les champs obligatoires sont indiqués avec *

Ce site utilise Akismet pour réduire les indésirables. En savoir plus sur comment les données de vos commentaires sont utilisées.