Archives par mot-clé : Vulnerability

CFP – Representations of the Body in Saga Literature – ICMS Kzoo 2018

Representations of the Body in Saga Literature

For ICMS at Western Michigan University – Kalamazoo, MI – May 10-13, 2018

The New England Saga Society is delighted to once again offer a panel for those interested in Old Norse literature, history, and culture. We are currently seeking proposals for our sponsored session, “Representations of the Body in Saga Literature,” a panel that will explore the ways in which bodies and corporeality are constructed and represented in saga literature.

The body is an object upon which culture writes itself. It is the site of definition and re-definition as it witnesses history, moves through time and space, and is shaped by social, political, and cultural phenomena. Understanding how medieval audiences viewed the body and participated in the social construction of the body as object is essential to a better appreciation of medieval ideations of the human condition. We are interested in cultural, ideological, and literary investigations of the experience of embodiment in medieval Scandinavia and the representation of this experience in literature, art, philosophy, ethics, law, theology, and science.

Topics could include, but are not limited to:

body-mind dichotomy
ideological constructions of the body
ableness and disability
the monstrous
gender and sexuality
illness, death, and dismemberment
body-soul dichotomy
pagan vs. Christian bodies
queer theory
medicine
medical transformations of the body
body as landscape
images of bodies

Brief (200-300 word) proposals are welcome anytime before September 15, 2017. Please e-mail abstracts to either of the organizers:

Andrew Pfrenger (apfrenge@kent.edu)

John P. Sexton (john.sexton@bridgew.edu)

CFP – Giving and Receiving Care in Times of War – IMC Leeds 2018

Giving and Receiving Care in Times of War

International Medieval Congress – Leeds
July 2018

During conflicts, bodies and minds are subjected to injury. Although a truism, this aspect of the experience of medieval warfare is somewhat underexplored. Recent studies of wounds and wounding and the incidence and experience of sickness during military campaigns have begun to focus attention on how medieval combatants and non-combatants suffered bodily and mental damage in times of war. At the same time, new work has put this experience in a medical context, examining contemporary sources to see how the experience of infirmity in times of war was recorded and interpreted by observers in the medieval medical framework of humoralism. However, there is scope for further investigation across the whole medieval period, and in particular on the experience of the incapacitated as recipients of bodily, psychological, medical and spiritual care.

 

The experience of the injured, sick, and incapacitated is one half of any medical history; the identity and practice of those who offer care to them is the other half. The role of carer is a complex one. Carers might have significant knowledge of nursing or medicine, or be thrust into the role of carer by circumstance. They may experience physical and emotional labour in offering care to the incapacitated, and need care themselves. Recent work on the history of medical practitioners shows us that we should look beyond those identified as ‘medics’ in contemporary to fully understand the landscape of medical care in the Middle Ages, but such pluralistic approaches have not yet been fully exploited, nor applied to the context of care in warfare.

It is the aim of these proposed sessions to explore the role, agency, behaviour, and subjective experience of recipients and givers of care in times of warfare throughout the whole medieval period, taking in the early, central and later Middle Ages. Submissions from an interdisciplinary background are particularly welcomed, including, but not limited to, work on narrative texts, literary works, documentary records, artistic sources, religious texts and others. Geographical and linguistic scope is not limited. Proposals will be considered for inclusion in a possible publication.

Topics for discussion could include:
• The identity of caregivers, both formal and informal
• The identity of those requiring care
• Care of the wounded and care of the sick
• Gendered aspects of giving and receiving care
• Transportation of the sick, wounded, incapacitated
• Treatment of the dead
• Caring for enemies, or prisoners of war
• Physical and psychological care
• Spiritual care
• The depiction of care in literary or artistic sources
• The care of injured, incapacitated or disabled combatants
and non-combatants
• The care of animals in a military context
• The relationship between nursing and medical
care/treatment
• The absence of care

Abstracts of up to 300 words should be directed, to J.Phillips@leeds.ac.uk by 04 September 2017.

More info on Academia.edu

CFP – Medieval Academy Graduate Students · The Program in Medieval Studies, Princeton University “Vulnerability in the Middle Ages”

Vulnerability in the Middle Ages

Princeton University, Medieval Academy Graduate Students

At a moment that has brought economic, political, and physical vulnerabilities (new and old) abruptly to the surface, we invite papers on the topic of vulnerability and insecurity in the Middle Ages. Recent scholarship in medieval poverty, gender, disability, and racial difference has greatly enhanced our sense of the variety of vulnerable experiences, and we seek to connect these conversations through their shared perspective on power. We welcome proposals from a variety of disciplines on vulnerability and the concepts that surround it, including weakness, insecurity, injury, disability, and difference. Papers might consider both the portrayal and the experience of the vulnerable life, as well as the systems that lead to vulnerability. We are interested both in the conditions that made individuals vulnerable within communities, and in those that threatened communities within larger polities. In a period where vulnerability typically precluded creating and maintaining records, unfamiliar readings of familiar sources are especially necessary, as are approaches that access vulnerable experiences in imaginative ways. Such approaches might challenge more conventional relationships between scholars and their objects of study, and ask how scholarship itself can perpetuate, create, or mitigate vulnerabilities in the past and present.

Some themes might include, but are not limited to:

– Contradictory perspectives on vulnerability (sympathy/revulsion, admiration/contempt)
– How difference (racial, gender, physical, economic, geographic) contributes to vulnerability
– Vulnerabilities specific to catastrophes, including war, famine, disease, and panic
– The relationship of systems of power to vulnerability
– The experience and portrayal of physical vulnerability
– The treatment (medical or otherwise) of vulnerable conditions
– Religious practices and perspectives on weakness
– “Vulnerability” in other words, such as vernacular translations and terminologies
– Documenting vulnerability and (materially, philologically, hermeneutically) vulnerable documents
– Populations vulnerable to scholarship, via origin or identity myths, institutions, and ideologies

Please submit your abstract (250 words) for a fifteen-minute presentation to the conference organizers (medievalvulnerabilities@gmail.com) by February 15th, 2017.

All abstracts should be in English, and include your name, contact information, and academic affiliation.

CFP – Wounding and Caring: Vulnerable Bodies in Narrative at the American Comparative Literature Association – Utrecht University in Utrecht, the Netherlands July 6-9, 2017.

Seminar – Wounding and Caring: Vulnerable Bodies in Narrative at the American Comparative Literature Association – Utrecht University in Utrecht, the Netherlands July 6-9, 2017.

Organizer: Andreea Marculescu

Co-Organizer: Amit Baishya

 

Vulnerability is a key term in a strand of recent feminist scholarship (Adriana Cavarero, Judith Butler, Rosalyn Diprose, Kelly Oliver, Ann Murphy). Vulnerability is not defined here as a temporary situation specific to certain subjects; rather, as Butler points out in Frames of War, it is a condition of social life, one where the subject is exposed to forms of violence that she cannot anticipate or pre-empt. In this sense, vulnerability is intrinsic to definitions of the “human” and captures the subject in intersubjective relations with a host of (unknown and, possibly, unknowable) others. Consideration of vulnerability entails, thus, both the recognition of one’s own dependency on others and the designing of collective mechanisms and frameworks of care for bodies. Furthermore, following the etymological root of the word vulnerability (the Latin vulnus), Cavarero underlines that this category designates a susceptibility to both wounding and caring. As a wounded body, the subject is unilaterally exposed to pain and suffering. The subject afflicted by such violence is trapped in the reality of her own suffering; she cannot step away or fight against the infliction of suffering upon her. Yet, this suffering body can also be cared for by others.

 

Therefore, while the risk of violence done by the other is a crucial factor in the analysis of vulnerability, frames of care that recognize the existence of particular vulnerable bodies should also be part of the critical discourse about the ethical and ontological status of precarious subjects. Indeed, external socio-political frameworks are crucial in validating which subjects can be placed (or not) under the category of vulnerability. Hence the need, according to Butler, for the introduction of a term such as « grievability »—the condition of possibility that determines whether a life is encompassed within the frames of vulnerability, risk and precariousness. « Wounding, » « caring, » « grievability, » and « responsibility » become, therefore, key terms that must be critically elaborated in tracing the physico-emotional profile of vulnerable bodies and also the recognition of their socio-cultural value.

 

Keeping these insights in mind, this seminar seeks to discuss the narrative production, valuation and circulation of vulnerable bodies belonging to different historical, social and political contexts. As we mentioned above, vulnerability should be understood as a shared condition that places us in relationships of dependence and linkage to others. We would like to initiate a transhistorical and cross-cultural discussion about the representation of vulnerable bodies in the dual sense outlined above in this seminar.

Contact the Seminar Organizers

Submit a paper for this seminar.