Archives par mot-clé : Religion

Conference – ‘Why is my pain perpetual?’ (Jer 15:18): Chronic Pain in the Middle Ages at UCL -29th september

‘Why is my pain perpetual?’ (Jer 15:18): Chronic Pain in the Middle Ages

 

Début : Sep 29, 2017 09:00 AM
Fin : Sep 29, 2017 07:00 PM

Emplacement IAS Common Ground, Ground Floor, South Wing, Wilkins Building

 

Pain is a universal human experience. We have all hurt at some point, felt that inescapable sensory challenge to our physical equanimity, our health and well-being compromised. Typically, our agonies are fleeting. For some, however, suffering becomes an artefact of everyday living: our pain becomes ‘chronic’. Chronic pain is persistent, usually lasting for three months or more, does not respond well to analgesia, and does not improve after the usual healing period of any injury.

Following Elaine Scarry’s (1985) seminal work The Body in Pain, researchers from various humanities disciplines have productively studied pain as a physical phenomenon with wide-ranging emotional and socio-cultural effects. Medievalists have also analysed acute pain, elucidating a specifically medieval construction of physical distress. In almost all such scholarship – modern and medieval – chronic pain has been overlooked.

The new field of medieval disability studies has also neglected chronic pain as a primary object of study. Instead, disability scholars in the main focus on ‘visible’ and ‘mainstream’ disabilities, such as blindness, paralysis, and birth defects. Indeed, disability historian Beth Linker argued in 2013 that ‘[m]ore historical attention should be paid to the unhealthy disabled’, including those in chronic pain (‘On the Borderland’, 526). This conference seeks specifically to pay ‘historical attention’ to chronic pain in the medieval era. It brings together researchers from across disciplines working on chronic pain, functioning as a collaborative space for medievalists to enter into much-needed conversations on this highly overlooked area of scholarship.

Relevant topics for this conference include:

-Medieval conceptions and theories of chronic pain, as witnessed by scientific, medical, and theological works
-Paradigms of chronic pain developed in modern scholarship – and what medievalists can learn from, and contribute to, them -Comparative analyses of chronic pain in religious versus secular narratives -Recognition or rejection of chronic pain as an affirmative subjective identity -Chronic pain and/as disability -The potential share-ability of pain in medieval narratives, such as texts which show an individual taking on the pain of another -The relationship between affect and the severity, understanding, and experience of pain -The manner in which gender impacts the experience, expression, and management of an individual’s chronic pain

Keynote address:

Prof Esther Cohen (Hebrew University of Jerusalem), one of the foremost scholars on pain in the Middle Ages, will deliver the keynote address: ‘What is Chronic Pain in a Non-Neural Age? Working Definitions, Sources, and Methodologies’.

Confirmed speakers:

-Dr Katherine Harvey (Birkbeck, University of London, UK), ‘Chronic Pain and the Saintly Bishop in Medieval England’
-Dr James McKinstry (Durham University, UK), ‘Headaches, Diseases, and Old Age: William Dunbar’s Diagnosis of Chronic Pain’
-Dr Michele Moatt (National Trust and Lancaster University, UK), ‘Chronic Pain and Prophecy in the Twelfth-century Life of Aelred of Rievaulx
-Catherine Coffey (Queen’s University, Belfast, Northern Ireland), ‘“Mit zwoelf tugenden stritet si wider das vleisch”: The Body Fighting the Flesh in Mechthild von Magdeburg’s Das fließende Licht der Gottheit
-Katherine Briant (Fordham University, New York, USA), ‘Pain as a Theological Framework in Julian of Norwich’s Vision and Revelation
-Dr Nicole Nyffenegger (Bern University, Switzerland), ‘Mary’s Perpetual Physical Pain: Affective Piety and “Doubling”’
-Prof Wendy J Turner (Augusta University, Georgia, USA), ‘Mental Complications of Pain: Age and Violence in Medieval England’
-Dr Bianca Frohne (University of Bremen, Germany), ‘Living With Pain: Constructions of a Corporeal Experience in Early and High Medieval Miracle Accounts’
-Dr William Maclehose (University College London, UK), ‘A Locus for Healing: Saints’ Shrines and Representations of Chronic Pain’

Bursaries for attendance:

This conference is generously supported by the Society for the Social History of Medicine. As such, members of the Society for the Social History of Medicine may apply for bursaries to facilitate attendance. We encourage all eligible parties to apply. Please see here for full details.

SSHM Logo

Registration:

-Please register here.
-The conference registration fee is £20. The fee is waived completely for concessions (students, the unwaged, retired scholars), though all attendees must register for the conference.
-The registration fee covers refreshments throughout the day for attendees, including tea and coffee at breaks, a sandwich lunch, and a wine reception. If you have any dietary requirements, please list these when you confirm your attendance.
Registration closes on 1st August 2017.

How to get to the conference:

-For details as to how to get to UCL on public transport, please see here.
-Please enter UCL through the gates at the Front Lodges on Gower Street (marked by the big red pin in the map below). This entrance offers the most direct route to the workshop location.
-The workshop takes place in the Institute of Advanced Studies (IAS), University College London, UK. We will be in the room Common Ground which is on the Ground Floor of the South Wing in the Wilkins Building. There is a variety of seating types available for attendees in this room. We will also have a QuietRoom (the Council Room G12) available for attendees to rest and take a break, located directly opposite Common Ground.
-Please follow the route as shown in the map below to reach Common Ground from the Front Lodges. This route is wheelchair accessible.
-To consult the disabledgo.com Access Guide for the Wilkins Building, please see here. Accessible bathroom facilities are available directly next to Common Ground, and also on the Lower Ground floor (by lift).

Common Ground Map

If you have any queries, including access requirements, please do not hesitate to contact the organiser, Alicia Spencer-Hall (a.spencer-hall [at] ucl.ac.uk).

This conference contributes to the ‘Sense and Sensation’ research strand at UCL’s Institute of Advanced Studies. This strand also comprises a Reading Group focused on chronic pain. To join the Reading Group, please email the organiser, Alicia Spencer-Hall (a.spencer-hall [at] ucl.ac.uk).

More info on the UCL website.

CFP – ICMS Kzoo 2018 – Disability, Devotion, and Subjectivity in Medieval and Renaissance England

CFP – ICMS Kzoo 2018 – Disability, Devotion, and Subjectivity in Medieval and Renaissance England

This panel invites trans-historical and trans-disciplinary examinations of pre-modern disability studies, focusing particularly on the construction of the devotional subject across the lines of periodicity. Medievalists and early modernists working in the burgeoning field of disability studies have shown that “disability” was an operative category in premodern texts, with subjects constituted by different or “non-standard” bodies, minds, and spirits. This roundtable proposes to extend this conversation by turning to religious experience and devotion, an important discursive field for the construction of identity by marginalized and/or minority groups.

Devotional manuals, spiritual biographies, and hagiographies – both before and after the Reformation – involve disclosures and depictions of impairment, asking their audiences to identify with a construction of ability related to devotional practice. Questions participants might ask include:
· What constitutes a “non-standard” body in pastoral, contemplative, and narrative devotional writing?
· How do figurative and allegorical depictions of disabled bodies in religious literature construct the disabled subject?
· What accommodations should be accepted for a disabled body to attain a recommended devotional posture?
· How does devotional didacticism approach variation in sensory acuity?
· How are devotional communities and cultures defined by conceptions of ability and impairment?
· Under which circumstances is the attainment of a-typical ability the aim of devotional practice?
· How might legal and ethical debates about injury, loss, and retribution be shaped by conceptions of impairment?

This roundtable invites a conversation on how devotional practices, and the very nature of devotion, evolved with (or stubbornly resisted) the Protestant and Catholic Reformations, reshaping the construction of the disabled subject. We invite a range of approaches, including contemporary theoretical lenses on disability studies as well as historical and literary-formal examinations of the subject.

Please send 300-word abstracts for ten-minute roundtable papers to José Villagrana (jvillagr@bates.edu) and Spencer Strub (spencer.strub@berkeley.edu) by September 15, 2017.

New publication – Premodern Dis/ability history. A Companion – Didymos pub.

Cordula Nolte, Bianca Frohne, Uta Halle, Sonja Kerth (Eds): A Handbook of Pre-Modern Dis/ability History (Didymos)

 

 

Pre-order here

 

Covering the period from 500 to 1800, this volume serves as a comprehensive guide into the growing field of dis/ability history. Its contributions by 80 international scholars present groundbreaking research in various historical disciplines, often unearthing hitherto unknown material and highlighting premodern societies from unfamiliar perspectives. The wide range of approaches and subjects comprises theoretical and methodological frameworks, general questions of gender, life-cycle and social status, daily life experiences,work and sustenance, legal norms and practices, strategies of coping and of self-help, medical therapies, organisation of care, emotions and religious interpretations. Compact information, vivid case studies and rich visual material grant an enjoyable and instructive reading for audiences who wish to explore premodern culture on innovative paths. »

 

Since the turn of the century, dis/ability history has been established as a promising, international field of research that enables us to look at historical cultures and societies from a completely new point of view, based on the analytical category of dis/ability. The number of relevant projects and publications is growing, methods and topics are in constant development. At the same time, various intersections with different current approaches within historical scholarship and cultural studies emerge. The combination of these aspects turns the attention of the academia and the wider public to this new research perspective. »
However, there is hardly any information available about the self-conception of dis/ability history, about its theories, methods and sources, and about its specific aims, subjects and leading questions. Whereas international dis/ability studies, which laid the groundwork for dis/ability history, have already put forth several handbooks, introductions and readers, dis/ability history is still in need of reference works wherein its basics are presented in a concise, readable, and systematic fashion.
This deficit is especially noticeable with regard to pre-modern dis/ability history, which is even more recent than modern dis/ability history, and where particular challenges have to be met, mainly due to the specifics of medieval and early modern sources. As there has been considerable output within a growing number of essays and edited volumes, but not often in form of monographs yet, it is quite difficult to keep track of research activities and to gain advanced insight into central fields of research.

This is where our handbook comes in. It addresses a diverse audience, including students and renowned scholars as well as interest groups, activists within the fields of politics, culture, education and social work who advocate empowerment and work towards social inclusion, as well as the general public with an interest in history.
The handbook aims to present the current state of research with regard to various disciplines, combining concise information with an accessible presentation based on primary sources and an arrangement of topics that captivates the reader’s interest.

The handbook

  • values interdisciplinarity: topics will be addressed by various disciplines, especially history, literary studies and linguistics, archaeology, anthropology, art history, sociology, religious studies, and theology.
  • brings together international authors (about 80 contributors).
  • is based on primary sources throughout.
  • explicitly addresses controversies regarding different research tendencies and methodologies.
  • combines diachronic and synchronic perspectives, applying a perspective of longue durée whenever possible.
  • entails articles in English and German (the latter being accompanied by English summaries).

 

Didymos-Verlag

Lange Straße 11 · D-71563 Affalterbach

Postfach 11 08 · D-71561 Affalterbach

Tel +49 71 44 › 26 11 791 · Fax +49 71 44 › 26 11 792

für Bestellungen / for orders

info@didymos-verlag.de · www.didymos-verlag.de

More infos on the Homo debilis Creative Unite website

Colloquium – Must see panels at IMCL – 3-6 July 2017 – ‘Otherness’

Colloquium – Must see panels at IMCL – 3-6 July 2017 – on ‘Otherness’

Please, feel free to contact us if you are giving a speech on something close to disability history that we miss.

Session 1018
Title Exceptionally Healthy?: Exploring Disease, Disfigurement, and Disability as the Norm in Medieval Culture
Date/Time Wednesday 5 July 2017: 09.00-10.30
Sponsor Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Research (MEMO), Swansea University / Wellcome ‘Effaced’ Project, Swansea University
Organiser Patricia E. Skinner, Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Research (MEMO), Swansea University
Moderator/Chair Elma Brenner, Wellcome Library, London
Paper 1018-a Epilepsy and Otherness: The Prophet and His Detractors
(Language: English)
Hillary Burgardt, Department of Classics, Ancient History & Egyptology, Swansea University
Index Terms: Medicine; Rhetoric; Sermons and Preaching; Social History
Paper 1018-b ‘Normality’ and the ‘Other’ at the End of the World: Sickness and Disability in the Passio Olavi
(Language: English)
Karl Christian Alvestad, Department of History, University of Winchester
Index Terms: Medicine; Religious Life; Social History
Paper 1018-c Looking Strange: A Positive Asset?
(Language: English)
Patricia E. Skinner, Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Research (MEMO), Swansea University
Index Terms: Medicine; Religious Life; Social History
Abstract Engaging with the problematic category ‘others’, this sessions takes as its starting point the sheer ubiquity of sick, disfigured and disabled persons in medieval narrative and legal texts, and ask whether it is tenable to propose good health as a ‘normal’ human state between 500 and 1500CE. The panellists take a queer view that challenges the paradigmatic position of those who were sick, disfigured or incapacitated as excluded or ‘on the margins’, and instead illustrates the necessity of inclusion of these groups in discourses of power and piety.
Session 1110
Title ‘For I am a woman, ignorant, weak, and frail’: Feminising Death and Disease in the Later Middle Ages
Date/Time Wednesday 5 July 2017: 11.15-12.45
Organiser Victoria Baker, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Rachael Gillibrand, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Moderator/Chair Rachael Gillibrand, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Paper 1110-a Death and the Maiden: Exploring the Feminisation of Death
(Language: English)
Victoria Baker, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Index Terms: Daily Life; Gender Studies
Abstract Within late medieval society, to be valued was to look and behave according to the societal ‘norm’ – dependency was largely represented as a feminine trait, whereas to be independent was to be masculine. How then did medieval people respond to deviations from these gendered expectations as a result of death (or dying) and chronic diseases? This session will consider the feminisation of death and disease through an interdisciplinary lens, in order to answer questions about the perceived ‘feminine’ dependency of the marginal ‘third state’ between being fully healthy and fully sick (i.e. to be dying or diseased). It will consider the contradictory nature of disease and the female response to death and disease as elements of daily life which were (largely) out of their control; the effect of death, disability, and disease on medieval constructions of masculinity; and whether – if death and disease dehumanise the body – is it even important to consider the effect of these states on an individual’s gendered identity?
Session 1118
Title Social Exclusion: Leprosy, Madness, and Wardrobe Malfunctions
Date/Time Wednesday 5 July 2017: 11.15-12.45
Organiser IMC Programming Committee
Moderator/Chair Patricia E. Skinner, Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Research (MEMO), Swansea University
Paper 1118-a The Transitory Convention of Madness in Arthurian Literature
(Language: English)
Erwann Hollevoet, Faculteit Letteren, KU Leuven / Group for Early Modern Studies, Universiteit Gent
Index Terms: Language and Literature – Middle English; Medicine; Philosophy; Social History
Paper 1118-b Clothing as a Means of Exclusion in Wolfram’s Parzival
(Language: English)
Alissa Theiss, Institut für Deutsche Philologie des Mittelalters, Philipps-Universität Marburg
Index Terms: Daily Life; Gender Studies; Language and Literature – German; Mentalities
Paper 1118-c ‘…with fleschelie lust sa maculait…’: Leprosy as Otherness in R. Henryson’s Testament of Cresseid
(Language: English)
Maria Luisa Maggioni, Dipartimento di Scienze linguistiche e letterature straniere, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Milano
Index Terms: Language and Literature – Middle English; Religious Life
Abstract Paper -a:
When Jacques Derrida in Cogito and the History of Madness denounced Michel Foucault’s project of providing the madman with a voice as the ‘greatest merit but also the very infeasibility of his book’ on the basis of its reliance on the reason-dominated language of philosophical tradition, he could have irrevocably silenced those madmen that have been exclusionary prohibited from participating within our constitutively reasonable society. However, there are other types of language that escape the constitutive dominance of reason and periods of history that preclude the exclusion of madness by reason and thus allow the true voice of madness to be heard. The voice of madness is not merely awakened in Arthurian literature; it also reveals the performative construction of medieval identificatory categories, as madness functions as a transitory literary convention within the construction of Arthurian knightly identity.

Paper -b:
In Wolfram of Eschenbach’s Parzival the young and naive Parzival sets forth for fame and fortune wearing a fool’s dress made by his mother. His clothing mirrors his manners. Due to Parzival’s foolish behaviour Lady Jeschute is being punished and humiliated without cause by her husband. She is no longer allowed to change her clothes. Parzival’s dress and Jeschute’s torn clothing are tantamount to a divestiture. The actions of Parzival, dressed up like a villain, lead to Jeschute becoming an outlaw herself. Lacking appropriate clothing she cannot take part in courtly society any longer. When eventually Parzival is able to prove her innocence, Jeschute’s re-entry into society is marked by being cloaked with her husband’s surcoat.

Paper -c:
‘Mass illnesses – from syphilis to cholera, from the Black Death to leprosy – have been linked to otherness both historically and cross-culturally’ (Yardley, 2013). In R. Henryson’s poem The Testament of Cresseid (mid-15th century) the protagonist’s punishment for her blasphemy is leprosy. This makes her a symbol for sexually transmitted diseases (in accordance with medieval belief) and for the persecuted and marginalized victim. The dramatic physical changes Cressida undergoes, which mark the beginning of her conversion, also cause her estrangement from her previous life. In order to highlight the connotative value of the vocabulary chosen by the Henryson, this study focuses on the linguistic means chosen by the Scottish poet to describe Cressida’s downfall and her becoming ‘other’ both physically and psychologically.

 

Session 1218
Title Leprosy and Power in the High Middle Ages
Date/Time Wednesday 5 July 2017: 14.15-15.45
Sponsor Graduate Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Reading
Organiser Katie Phillips, Graduate Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Reading
Moderator/Chair Elma Brenner, Wellcome Library, London
Paper 1218-a From Heinrich to Tristan: The Changing Function of Lepers in Middle High German Literature
(Language: English)
Madelon Köhler-Busch, Department of Humanities, University of Wisconsin-Platteville
Index Terms: Canon Law; Language and Literature – German; Pagan Religions; Social History
Paper 1218-b ‘The Conspicuous Patron of Lepers’?: Lepers and the King in the 12th and Early 13th Centuries
(Language: English)
Paul Webster, School of History, Archaeology & Religion, Cardiff University
Index Terms: Medicine; Politics and Diplomacy; Religious Life
Paper 1218-c Locus (in)honestus: Early Franciscan Attitudes towards the Leper Hospital
(Language: English)
Edward Sutcliffe, Department of Religion & Theology, University of Bristol
Index Terms: Ecclesiastical History; Hagiography; Religious Life
Abstract The papers in this session will explore the relationship between lepers and authority, focussing particularly on England and France in the central Middle Ages. The complex and ambiguous perceptions of the disease resulted in similarly complicated responses, both towards individuals diagnosed with leprosy, and towards groups of lepers living in dedicated leper houses. The session will explore the way in which lepers may have used their diagnosis to their advantage, and perhaps exploited their ‘Otherness’. In addition, the responses of kings and legal bodies are examined as a means of understanding contemporary reactions to leprosy.
Session 1240
Title Health and Medicine in the Early Medieval West, I: Situating Medical Texts and Practices
Date/Time Wednesday 5 July 2017: 14.15-15.45
Organiser Claire Burridge, Faculty of History, University of Cambridge
Zubin Mistry, School of History, Classics & Archaeology, University of Edinburgh
Moderator/Chair Claire Burridge, Faculty of History, University of Cambridge
Paper 1240-a The Female Patient, the Physician, and Medical Responsibility in Late Antiquity
(Language: English)
Caroline Musgrove, Faculty of Classics, University of Cambridge
Index Terms: Daily Life; Gender Studies; Medicine; Women’s Studies
Paper 1240-b Teraupetica (sic) : Manuscript Context and Christian Ideology in an Early Medieval Book of Medical Recipes
(Language: English)
Arsenio Ferraces-Rodríguez, Departamento de Letras, Universidade da Coruña
Index Terms: Manuscripts and Palaeography; Medicine; Theology
Paper 1240-c ‘Mirubalanus est genus coriote nascitur in egypto’: Mapping Pharmaceutical Provenance in Early Medieval Recipe Collections
(Language: English)
Jeffrey Doolittle, Department of History, Fordham University
Index Terms: Daily Life; Medicine
Abstract Despite important new work, early medieval medicine still remains quarantined from the mainstream of early medieval historiography. The aim of these sessions is to diagnose and treat this historiographical ‘otherness’ by using health and medicine as ways of exploring early medieval societies. This first session focuses on situating medical texts, traditions and practices. Papers will use medical texts to explore a range of questions including the relationship between practical medicine and Christian ideology, gender and medical practice, the nature of learning, and connections across space and time.
Session 1319
Title Body, Soul, and Otherness, II: Religious and Medical Definitions of Mental and Physical Difference
Date/Time Wednesday 5 July 2017: 16.30-18.00
Sponsor ‘The Body in the City’ Consortium & Trivium, Tampere Centre for Classical, Medieval & Early Modern Studies, University of Tampere
Organiser Jenni Kuuliala, School of Social Sciences & Humanities, University of Tampere
Moderator/Chair Gordon Whyte, School of Philosophical, Historical & International Studies, Monash University, Victoria
Paper 1319-a Demonic Possession and the Physical, Spiritual, and Social ‘Other’
(Language: English)
Sari Katajala-Peltomaa, School of Social Sciences & Humanities, University of Tampere
Index Terms: Hagiography; Lay Piety; Medicine; Mentalities
Paper 1319-b Effacing Demons: Ritual and Medical Care in Medieval Drama
(Language: English)
Andreea-Dana Marculescu, Department of Women’s & Gender Studies, University of Oklahoma
Index Terms: Language and Literature – French or Occitan; Lay Piety; Medicine; Mentalities
Paper 1319-c Sainthood, Physical Deviance, and Otherness in the Late Middle Ages
(Language: English)
Jenni Kuuliala, School of Social Sciences & Humanities, University of Tampere
Index Terms: Hagiography; Lay Piety; Medicine; Social History
Abstract Religion and medicine were in many ways intertwined in the Middle Ages, both in explaining deviance, illness, and impairment as well as in the healing practices. Religion and medicine also offered methods, which sometimes overlapped and sometimes contradicted each other, for cure and for ways to integrate deviant people back into a community. This session analyses healing as a cultural practice; the focal questions are how religious and medical explanations intermingled in the construction of ‘the Other’, and in what ways they complemented or competed in explaining, categorising, and treating different mental and bodily conditions.
Session 1340
Title Health and Medicine in the Early Medieval West, II: Beyond Medical Texts
Date/Time Wednesday 5 July 2017: 16.30-18.00
Organiser Claire Burridge, Faculty of History, University of Cambridge
Zubin Mistry, School of History, Classics & Archaeology, University of Edinburgh
Moderator/Chair Richard Sowerby, School of History, Classics & Archaeology, University of Edinburgh
Paper 1340-a Incorporating Palaeopathological Evidence in the Study of Early Medieval Health and Medicine
(Language: English)
Claire Burridge, Faculty of History, University of Cambridge
Index Terms: Archaeology – General; Daily Life; Medicine; Technology
Paper 1340-b Soul-Searching: Some Carolingian Answers
(Language: English)
Meg Leja, History Department, Binghamton University
Index Terms: Learning (The Classical Inheritance); Medicine; Theology
Paper 1340-c ‘There are three reasons why sterilitas affects women’: Thinking about Fertility in Carolingian Monasteries
(Language: English)
Zubin Mistry, School of History, Classics & Archaeology, University of Edinburgh
Index Terms: Biblical Studies; Gender Studies; Learning (The Classical Inheritance); Medicine
Abstract Despite important new work, early medieval medicine still remains quarantined from the mainstream of early medieval historiography. The aim of these sessions is to diagnose and treat this historiographical ‘otherness’ by using health and medicine as ways of exploring early medieval societies. This second session uses medical and non-medical texts to explore ideas about body and soul as well as non-textual approaches to investigate the health of early medieval populations.
Session 1508
Title Crusading, Identity, and Otherness, I: Women, Children, and the Old
Date/Time Thursday 6 July 2017: 09.00-10.30
Sponsor Northern Network for the Study of the Crusades
Organiser Kathryn Hurlock, Department of History, Politics & Philosophy, Manchester Metropolitan University
Sini Kangas, School of Social Sciences & Humanities, University of Tampere
Jason T. Roche, Department of History, Politics & Philosophy, Manchester Metropolitan University
Moderator/Chair Jason T. Roche, Department of History, Politics & Philosophy, Manchester Metropolitan University
Paper 1508-a The Young and The Old – Feeble Crusaders?: Age in the 12th- and 13th-Century Sources of the Crusades
(Language: English)
Sini Kangas, School of Social Sciences & Humanities, University of Tampere
Index Terms: Crusades; Pagan Religions
Paper 1508-b Women and Children as Victims of the Baltic Crusades: A Case of ‘Ritual Violence’?
(Language: English)
Torben Kjersgaard Nielsen, Institut for Kultur og Globale Studier / Cultural Encounters in Pre-Modern Societies, Aalborg Universitet
Index Terms: Crusades; Pagan Religions
Paper 1508-c The Damascene Frontier, 1099-1128: Frankish / Turkish Conflict and Peacemaking during the Post-First Crusade Era
(Language: English)
Nicholas E. Morton, School of Arts & Humanities, Nottingham Trent University
Index Terms: Crusades; Military History
Abstract In the first of a series of linked sessions on the interrelated themes of crusading, identity, and otherness, Sini Kangas explores the understanding of youth and old age in the 12th- and 13th-century chronicles and chansons of the Crusades, showing how age is employed to shed light on specific contexts, offer additional information, and emphasise small but important details. Tørben Nielsen discusses the Christian expansion in pagan Livonia and Estonia between the years 1184 and 1227 as reported in the Chronicon Livoniae, and seeks to understand why women and children appear repeatedly in the text as the numberless and nameless victims of the crusading warfare. Nic Morton considers the Damascene frontier during the first three decades of the 12th century, and explains why the city’s ruler, Tughtakin, was reluctant to risk a direct confrontation with the newly established Frankish settlers.
Session 1625
Title Apocalyptic Alterity: Otherness and the End Times
Date/Time Thursday 6 July 2017: 11.15-12.45
Organiser Brett E. Whalen, Department of History, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Moderator/Chair Felicitas Schmieder, Historisches Institut, FernUniversität Hagen
Respondent James Palmer, St Andrews Institute of Mediaeval Studies, University of St Andrews
Paper 1625-a Everybody Wants to Rule the World: Crusading Soldiers of Christ at the End of Time
(Language: English)
Matthew Gabriele, Department of Religion & Culture, Virginia Technical Institute
Index Terms: Crusades; Historiography – Medieval; Theology
Paper 1625-b Church, Empire, and Apocalypse in the 13th Century
(Language: English)
Brett E. Whalen, Department of History, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Index Terms: Ecclesiastical History; Historiography – Medieval; Political Thought
Paper 1625-c Heavenly Hermaphrodites: Sexual Difference and the End of Time
(Language: English)
Leah DeVun, Department of History, Rutgers University, New Jersey
Index Terms: Gender Studies; Historiography – Medieval; Sexuality
Abstract Medieval Europe’s apocalyptic imagination provided a compelling field of ideas, texts, and images for Christians to project and contest the norms of their society, framed by the envisioned progress of time from its beginning to its end. This proposed panel will explore some of the ways that apocalyptic and eschatological views of salvation history informed attitudes towards the ‘self’ and ‘others’, past, present, and future, shaping religious, political, and sexual identities. The papers and commentary will also suggest some of the ways that studies of apocalypticism during the Middle Ages have changed over recent years, looking past long-standing debates and issues in the field (e.g. the year 1000, the radical nature of millennialism) to embrace new questions and problems relating to the significance of the apocalypse for medieval intellectual life, society, and spirituality.

 

All Leeds infos here !

CFP – Sanctifying the Crip, Cripping the Sacred – IMCL 2018

Panel title: “Sanctifying the Crip, Cripping the Sacred: Disability, Holiness, and Non-Normative Bodies”

Sponsored by: Hagiography Society

Conference: International Medieval Congress, Leeds (UK), 2-5 July 2018

In her 2006 monograph Disability in Medieval Europe, Irina Metzler conducted the first in-depth analyses of medieval miracle narratives in the context of disability studies. This ground-breaking work demonstrated the ways in which such an approach productively expands – and complicates – out understanding of medieval impairment and medieval hagiography alike. This panel seeks to harness the methodological vigour of Metzler’s intervention, and move the discussion forward to reap the benefits of the efflorescence in medieval disability studies that has taken place since 2006. What can frameworks from disability studies add to studies of medieval holiness, and vice versa? What happens when we sanctify the crip, and crip the sacred?

A vast amount of our knowledge of the experience of impairment in the Middle Ages comes from religious works. An important manifestation of a presumptive saint’s holiness was their capacity to perform mystically curative healings, to return their devotees to an able-bodied state. But medieval saints did not just tend to those with impairment. Some saints were themselves explicitly physically impaired, either permanently or temporarily. Saints’ ascetic self-mortification could also lead to impairment. In all instances, the saint’s body is divergent to the able-bodied norm of those around them, the non-saintly. It operates as a vector of the divine in miraculous healing of others; a receptacle of the divine in their ability to withstand extreme ascetic degradation. What is at stake if we consider the medieval saint’s body as impaired, disabled, emphatically non-able-bodied?

If you’re interested in speaking on this panel, please submit an abstract of roughly 250-300 words, and a brief bio to the panel organiser, Alicia Spencer-Hall (a.spencer-hall [at] ucl.ac.uk), by 1 August 2017 [extended deadline 25 august]. Please also stipulate your audio-visual requirements in your submission (e.g. projector, speakers, and so forth).

N.B. Conference regulations stipulate that speakers may only present on one panel each year at Leeds. As such, we cannot consider papers from individuals who have already submitted abstract proposals to other sessions at the conference.

Link to the organisator’s website

Demons and Illness from Antiquity to the Early-Modern Period

Demons and Illness from Antiquity to the Early-Modern Period

Edited by Siam Bhayro and Catherine Rider, University of Exeter, Brill edition.

Table of contents

Introduction, Siam Bhayro and Catherine Rider
Antiquity
Shifting Alignments: The Dichotomy of Benevolent and Malevolent Demons in Mesopotamia, Gina Konstantopoulos
The Natural and Supernatural Aspects of Fever in Mesopotamian Medical Texts, András Bácksay
Illness as Divine Punishment: The Nature and Function of the Disease-Carrier Demons in the Ancient Egyptian Magical Texts, Rita Lucarelli
Demons at Work in Ancient Mesopotamia, Lorenzo Verderame
Late Antiquity
Demons and Illness in Second Temple Judaism: Theory and Practice, Ida Fröhlich
Illness and Healing through Spell and Incantation in the Dead Sea Scrolls, David Hamidović
Conceptualizing Demons in Late Antique Judaism, Gideon Bohak
Oneiric Aggressive Magic: Sleep Disorders in Late Antique Jewish Tradition, Alessia Bellusci
The Influence of Demons on the Human Mind According to Athenagoras and Tatian, Chiara Crosignani
Demonic Anti-Music and Spiritual Disorder in the Life of Antony, Sophie Sawicka-Sykes
Over-eating Demoniacs in Late Antique Hagiography, Sophie Lunn-Rockliffe
Medieval
Miracles and Madness: Dispelling Demons in Twelfth-Century Hagiography, Anne E. Bailey
Demons in Lapidaries? The Evidence of the Madrid MS Escorial, h. I. 15., Carolina Escobar-Vargas
The Melancholy of the Necromancer in Arnau de Vilanova’s Epistle against Demonic Magic, Sebastià Giralt
Demons, Illness and Spiritual Aids in Natural Magic and Image Magic, Lauri Ockenström
Between Medicine and Magic: Spiritual Aetiology and Therapeutics in Medieval Islam, Liana Saif
Demons, Saints, and the Mad in the Twelfth-Century Miracles of Thomas Becket, Claire Trenery
Early Modernity
The Post-Reformation Challenge to Demonic Possession, Harman Bhogal
From A Discoverie to The Triall of Witchcraft: Doctor Cotta and Godly John, Pierre Kapitaniak
Healing with Demons? Preternatural Philosophy and Superstitious Cures in Spanish Inquisitorial Courts, Bradley J. Mollmann
Afterword: Pandaemonium, Peregrine Horden

 

 

Le laboratoire ICT (Identités, Cultures, Territoires, Université Paris 7 – Paris Diderot) et le Groupe de Recherche sur l’Eugénisme et le Racisme (UFR EILA, Université Paris 7 – Paris Diderot) sont heureux de vous inviter à une discussion sur Anthropologie et Histoire du Handicap autour de la présentation des derniers ouvrages de Henri-Jacques Stiker (chercheur associé au laboratoire ICT, Université Paris 7 – Paris Diderot).

Cette rencontre, suivie d’un verre de l’amitié, se tiendra le mercredi 22 mars 2017 de 17h à 19h à l’université Paris 7 – Paris Diderot, bâtiment Sophie Germain, amphithéâtre Turing (8 Place Aurélie Nemours, 75013 Paris, plan en pièce jointe, accessible aux Personnes à mobilité réduite).

Pour toutes demandes complémentaires merci de contacter ninon.dubourg@gmail.com.

En espérant vous accueillir nombreux à cette présentation d’ouvrages,

Nos cordiales salutations.

CFP – Lived religion and everyday life through earlymodern catholic hagiography – Finland Institute in Rome

Lived religion and everyday life through earlymodern catholic hagiography – Finland Institute in Rome

Final submission of articles: Autumn 2013

Studies on medieval social and cultural history have already for several decades demonstrated the rich possibilities hagiographic material can offer the historian interested in everyday life, lived religion and society. Since the late fifteenth century, this material has experienced an unprecedented growth in volume. Nevertheless. there is still a great need for studies on lived religion and everyday life portrayed through early modem catholic hagiographic material.

To address this need. we invite abstracts for contributions on the subject from scholars worthy with early modem (ca. 15km » centuries) hagiographic material. such as beatification and canonisation processes. other miracle accounts. art, vitae. and other spiritual (autobiographies. The aim is to produce a high-quality collection of articles, which offers cutting-edge and fruitful insights into early modern social and cultural history, using hagiographic texts and art as sources. We especially welcome communications, which have a sensitive approach to gender, age, health and social status.

The deadline for submitting abstracts is the end of February 2017. Twelve most promising abstracts will be selected. it funding cm be secured, the article drafts will be discussed it May 2018 in a workshop organised at the Finnish Institute in Rome (Vita Lante). The collection of articles will be submitted to an international publisher following the peer-review process soon after the meeting, in autumn 2018.

Suitable article topics for the collection will include. but are not limited to:

  • family and household, gender roles
  • health, body, dis/ability, illness, and cure
  • death and salvation
  • religious practices and materiality of religion
  • identity and community

    Please send an abstract of no more than 300 words for an English article and a short biography including name, affiliation and the most important publications, to earlymodernhagiography@gmail.com by Tuesday February 28th. 2017.

Editors and contact informations:
Jenni Kuuliala
PhD. Postdoctoral Researcher (Academy of Finland)
University of Tampere

Programme – Disability and Religion, 10th Disease, Disability & Medicine in the Medieval World, Anniversary Annual Meeting, Swansea University 2-3 December 2016

f

Disease, Disability & Medicine in the Medieval World

10th Anniversary Annual Meeting, Swansea University 2-3 December 2016

at the National Waterfront Museum, Swansea

Disability and Religion

PROGRAMME

FRIDAY 2nd December

10:00 Welcome (Irina Metzler, Swansea University)

10:15-11:15 Opening Keynote Address

Responsibility, Sin, and Impairment in the Middle Ages

Wendy J. Turner (Augusta University)

11:15-12:45 Panel: Disabled Religious: Saints, Monks and Anchoresses

Moderator: Alicia Spencer-Hall

Disability or Super-ability? Saints’ Infirmities as a Tool for Constructing Sanctity

(Jenni Kuuliala, University of Tampere)

Deaf, Monks and Sign Language

(Yann Cantin, Université-Paris 8)

Ancrene Riwle: Disabling the Able, How Un-Medieval!

(Stan Booth, University of Winchester)

12:45-13:45 Lunch

13:45-14:40 Panel: Non-conformist Bodies

Moderator: Stan Booth

The Hun and the Hunchback

Mark Humphries (Swansea University)

‘Sumo michi baculum’: Problematizing the Purpose of ‘Walking Sticks’ in the Late Middle Ages

(Rachael Gillibrand, University of Leeds)

14:40-15:35 Panel: Miracles and Metaphors

Moderator: Ninon Dubourg

The Cure-Seeking Experiences of Disabled Children in Twelfth-Century English Miracula

(Ruth Salter, University of Reading)

A Double Absence: Cupid and Blind Lucy Reading John Donne’s ‘Nocturnal Upon St. Lucy’s Day, Being The Shortest Day’

(Chris Mounsey, University of Winchester)

15:35-16:00 Coffee Break

16:00-16:50 Panel: Relevance of Digital Tools for Medieval Manuscript Studies

(Erin Connelly, University of Pennsylvania)

This panel will take the form of a presentation followed by a workshop inviting audience participation and discussion

SATURDAY 3rd December

9:15-10:45 Panel: Disability and Mental ‘Abnormality’

Moderator: Wendy Turner

Graeco-Latin Medical Learning in an Early Irish Pseudo-Etymology of Boicmell ‘Fool’

(Anna Matheson, Centre de recherche bretonne et celtique, Rennes)

The Holy Fool and the Madman: When was Mental Abnormality a Disability?

(Claire Trenery, Royal Holloway, University of London)

Skiptingr, Congeon and Wehselkind: Exploring the Medieval Discourse on Changelings and Idiocy through Vernacular Insults

(Rose Sawyer, University of Leeds)

10:45-11:05 Coffee Break

11:05-12:00 Panel: Disability and Leprosy

Moderator: Trish Skinner

Disability and Ability within the Leper Houses of Medieval Normandy

(Elma Brenner, Wellcome Library)

Redeemed by a Good Death!

(Timothy Jones, University of Cardiff)

12:00-13:00 Lunch

13:00-13:55 Panel: Disability in the Earlier Middle Ages

Moderator: Christina Lee

Finding Disability in Early Medieval Sources: The Case of Bishop Æthelwold of Winchester

(Alison Hudson, The British Library)

A Disabled Corpse – An Exploration of the Potential Significance of an Anglo Saxon Burial Cluster from Great Chesterford, Essex

(Stephanie Evelyn-Wright, University of Southampton)

13:55-14:50 Panel: ‘Alien’ Disability

Moderator: Irina Metzler

‘A horse ought to be held dear due to its goodness; because one should desire goodness over beauty’: Utility, Disfigurement, and Occupational Health in Later Medieval Horse Medicine

(Sunny Harrison, University of Leeds)

Mohammed the Epileptic: Religious Propaganda in the Middle Ages

(Hillary Burgardt, Swansea University)

14:50-15:05 Coffee Break

15:05-16:00 Panel: Periodization in Disability History: A Roundtable

Participants:

David Turner (Swansea University, panel co-ordinator and chair)

Trish Skinner (Swansea University)

Bianca Frohne (Universität Bremen)

Daniel Blackie (University of Oulu)

16:00-16:35 Concluding Keynote Address

Disease, Disability and Medicine: Past, Present and Future(s)

Christina Lee (University of Nottingham)

16:35-16:45 Closing Remarks

Many thanks to the organiser of this year, Irina Metzler.

CFP – Religious and/or Medicinal definitions of Otherness – IMC

Religious and/or Medicinal definitions of Otherness,

IMC Leeds 2017

Religion and medicine were in many ways intertwined in the Middle Ages, both in explaining deviance, illness and impairment as well as in the healing practices. They are not anymore seen as competing but rather as supporting, even complementing each other.  Both religion and medicine had their own ways of defining the undesirable, which could lead to the construction of ‘The Other’ – be it disability, mental disorder, or heterodoxy. Some features, like lunacy, leprosy, impotence, or infertility were in the nexus of both religious and medicinal explanations. Both religion and medicine could also offer methods for cure and ways to integrate the deviant persons back into a community. The interconnection of both concepts can be found, for example, in hagiography, sermons, medical treatises and herbals. These sessions aim to analyse healing as cultural practice; the focal questions are how religious and medicinal explanation intermingled in the construction of ‘the Other’ and in what ways they complemented or competed in explaining, categorizing and treating different spiritual, mental and bodily conditions.

We aim at organizing a double session focusing on following questions:

  • Role of medicine and/or religion in constructing the Other
  • Role of medicine and/or religion in experiences of the patient
  • Religion and medicine – rivalling, complementing or symbiotic?
  • Treating the patient, curing the ailment – integration or permanent marginalization?
  • Faith healing and placebo – synonyms, interconnection, anachronisms?

We encourage proposals sensitive to temporal and/or geographical changes focusing on various cultural levels and social contexts. Those interested in presenting a paper in this panel, please submit an abstract of roughly 250-300 words to the organisers by 23 September 2016.

Contacts:
Jenni Kuuliala jenni.kuuliala@uta.fi
Sari Katajala-Peltomaa sari.katajala-peltomaa@uta.fi
Trivium, Tampere Centre for Classical, Medieval, and Early Modern Studies