Archives par mot-clé : Neurology

CFP – IMC Leeds 2018 – Panel on Memory & Mental Health organised by Amsterdam University Press

Call for Papers — Leeds IMC, 2-5 July 2018 – Panel on Memory & Mental Health
Sponsor: Amsterdam University

Press Organizer: Tyler Clohertv,

Many medieval records in both medicine and law record individuals as « unfit » or « unhealthy » because of a lack of a good memory, often non bonam memoriam or some variation thereon. This panel seeks to address what exactly that phrase meant, how it might impair the person, and what implications it might hold in terms of health, wealth, legal standing, and/or inheritance. We seek papers on both historic persons and concepts as well as literary papers that might have characters that also reflect this dynamic. All fields of medieval history (roughly from 400-1600) are welcome.

Contact: Tyler Cloherty, t.cloherty@aup.n1 Due: September 15th Include: Name, Title (with a sentence or two explanation), affiliation, address, phone, email, and please indicate whether you are a student or a faculty member.

This session is sponsored by the AUP series: Premodern Health, Disease, and Disability

Conference – The Medieval Brain – University of York, 9-10-11 March 2017

Conference – The Medieval Brain – University of York, 9-10-11 March 2017

medieval-brain

 

Reminder of the CFP :

As we research aspects of the medieval brain, we encounter complications generated by medieval thought and twenty-first century medicine and neurology alike. Our understanding of modern-day neurology, psychiatry, disability studies, and psychology rests on shifting sands. Not only do we struggle with medieval terminology concerning the brain, but we have to connect it with a constantly-moving target of modern understanding. Though we strive to avoid interpreting the past using presentist terms, it is difficult – or impossible – to work independently of the framework of our own modern understanding. This makes research into the medieval brain and ways of thinking both challenging and exciting. As we strive to know more about specifically medieval experiences, while simultaneously widening our understanding of the brain today, we much negotiate a great deal of complexity.

In this three-day workshop, to be held at the University of York on Thursday 9th, Friday 10th and Saturday 11th March 2017 under the auspices of the Centre for Chronic Diseases and Disorders, we will explore the topic of ‘the medieval brain’ in the widest possible sense. The ultimate aim is to provide a forum for discussion, stimulating new collaborations from a multitude of voices on, and approaches to, the theme.

Confirmed keynote speakers:

Carole Rawcliffe (University of East Anglia)

Corinne Saunders (Durham University)

Jonathan Hsy (George Washington University)

 

Find the programm draft here

CFP – ICMS Kalamazoo 2017: “Grey Matter: Brains, Diseases, and Disorders”

Call for papers: ICMS Kalamazoo 2017

“Grey Matter: Brains, Diseases, and Disorders”

Special session organised by Deborah Thorpe, Centre for Chronic Diseases and Disorders at the University of York, UK.

Description:

This session invites papers that examine any aspect of medieval cognition, neurology, and/or psychiatry through medieval source material. This topic can be approached through any one or combination of disciplines, and novel combinations of disciplines are encoraged. Especially welcome are papers that consider the relationships between modern medicine and medieval source material, such as the benefits and/or inherent problems of retrospective diagnosis and the value of the study of medieval history for our medical understanding today.

The session also encourages papers that explore terminology for diseases and disorders both modern and premodern, the diagnosis of conditions involving the brain, and the impact of neurological/psychiatric diseases and disorders on medieval lives.

Send abstracts of no more than 250 words, or any questions about this session, to Deborah.thorpe@york.ac.uk

 

See the CFP on Deborah’s Thorpe blog « The scribe Unbound ».