Archives par mot-clé : Medieval attitudes

CFP – ‘Objects, Extensions, Prosthetics: The Body and Subjectivity in the Pre-Modern Period’ – 28th Feb 2018 – Newcastle University.

Objects, Extensions, Prosthetics: The Body and Subjectivity in the Pre-Modern Period

Wednesday 28th February 2018, 1-6pm Newcastle University.

We invite postgraduates and early career researchers based in the North to give short (15 minute) talks at an afternoon seminar event on Wednesday 28th February 2018. This event will include a key note from Professor Helen Smith (University of York) in response to the talks given and a group discussion of the topics to close, as well as a free lunch included. The seminar will focus on how objects function as extensions of the self the medieval and early modern period. Can objects be sites of emotional or literary expression? Do they reflect pre-modern notions vi interior/exterior selves? Can they be considered as Metonymic’ substitutions for the self? We invite PGRs/ECRs to present on this theme a, well as partake in group discussions over the course of the afternoon. Topics might include (but are not limited to) the following:

  • The body (skin, hair)
  • Fashion (clothing, textiles)
  • Prosthetics
  • Books (print., literary or personal, notebooks)
  • Stage props (/object and costumes)
  • Household items
  • Religious/sacred objects

If you would like to get involved with this seminar event and give a short paper, please send an expression of interest along with topic details (no more than 200 words) no later than 15thJanuary 2018. and/or any queries. to Emily Rowe – e.c.rowe2@newcastle.ac.uk

CFP – Chaucer: Sound and Vision – October 19th and 20th, 2018 – University of South Alabama

CFP – Chaucer: Sound and Vision,

October 19th and 20th, 2018

Deadline for Submissions: May 1, 2018

Name of Organization: University of South Alabama

Contact Email: ChaucerSoundAndVision@gmail.com

The English Department at the University of South Alabama invites paper proposals for a conference on Chaucer and the senses (vision, hearing, touch, smell, taste), to be held in Mobile, Alabama, October 19th and 20th, 2018. Papers on any aspect of the topic are welcome, along with papers on writers contemporary with Chaucer (Langland, Gower, the Pearl-poet, Julian of Norwich, etc.).

The plenary speaker will be Michael P. Kuczynski of Tulane University. The conference will also include a roundtable discussion on the state of Sound Studies. Outstanding papers will also be invited to submit expanded versions for an edited volume on the topic.

Please send proposals of 350 words to John Halbrooks and Becky McLaughlin at ChaucerSoundAndVision@gmail.com by May 1, 2018.

Meeting – International Workshop “Gender(ed) Histories of Health, Healing and the Body, 1250-1550” – 25/26 jan. 2018 at a.r.t.e.s. Cologne

International Workshop “Gender(ed) Histories of Health, Healing and the Body, 1250-1550”

Thursday, January 25 to Friday, January 26 2018 / a.r.t.e.s. Graduate School for the Humanities Cologne, Aachener Str. 217, 50931 Cologne

 

Participation is free, to register please send an email to Eva Cersovky (cersovse@uni-koeln.de) by Friday, January 19, 2018.

This international workshop aims at systematically exploring the manifold relations between gender, health and healing during the 13th to 16th centuries, situating them at the nexus of medical, social, cultural, religious and economic concerns. Speakers focus on areas of the field which still require additional and more comprehensive attention with regard to gender, e.g. the household as a site of giving and receiving care but also of producing medicine, the healing and caring practices of religious women, the role of miscellanies or print in disseminating medical and bodily knowledge as well as perceptions of disability, infertility and age, to only name a few. Considering how distinct forms of healing were gendered in different texts and contexts and by different groups of people, speakers employ a wide variety of sources from a number of European countries as well as the Arabic world, ranging from medical treatise and recipes to hagiography and archival documents of practice as well as literary, visual and material sources. The workshop brings together historians from five countries, different disciplines and at all career stages, providing a forum for international discussion and reflection upon methodological and theoretical frameworks of the field.

 

Programm

Thursday, 25 January 2018

10:00-10:30: Eva-Maria Cersovsky and Ursula Gießmann (both Univ. of Cologne): Welcome and Introduction

10:30-11:30 KEYNOTE: Sharon Strocchia (Emory Univ.): The Politics of Household Medicine at the Early Medici Court

11:30-11:45: Coffee Break

SESSION I: SOURCES OF RELIGIOUS HEALING
Chair: Sabine von Heusinger (Univ. of Cologne)

11:45-12:30: Sara M. Ritchey (Univ. of Tennessee): Foliated Healing: Miscellanies as Sources for Gendered Medical Practice in the Late Medieval Low Countries

12:30-13:15: Krisztina Ilko (Univ. of Cambridge): Friars, Women, and Saints. Investigating Healing Miracles of the Early Augustinian Beati

13:15-14:45: Lunch

14:45-15:30: Iliana Kandzha (Central European Univ. Budapest): Female Saints as Agents of Female Healing?: Issues of Gendered Practices and Patronage in the Cult of St Cunigunde (1200-1350)

SESSION II: PRODUCING, TRANSMITTING AND APPLYING KNOWLEDGE
Chair: Bernhard Hollick (Univ. of Cologne / GHI London)

15:30-16:15: Linda Ehrsam Voigts (Univ. of Missouri): Women and Medical Distillation at a Great Household in Late-Medieval England

16:15-16:45: Coffee Break

16:45-17:30: Belle S. Tuten (Juniata College): Care of the Breast in Late Medieval Medicine

17:30-18:15: Julia Gruman Martins (Univ. of London): Understanding/Controlling the Female Body in Ten Recipes: Print and the Dissemination of Medical Knowledge about Women in the Early 16th Century

Friday, 26 January 2018

SESSION III: INFIRMITY AND CARE
Chair: Letha Böhringer (Univ. of Cologne)

09:00-09:45: Donna Trembinski (St. Francis Xavier Univ.): At the Intersection of Sex and Gender: Infirm Masculinities and Femininities in the Thirteenth Century

09:45-10:30: Cordula Nolte (Univ. of Bremen): Domestic Care in the 15th and 16th Centuries: Expectations, Experiences, and Practices from a Gendered Perspective

10:30-11:00: Coffee Break

11:00-11:45: Eva-Maria Cersovsky (Univ. of Cologne): Ubi non est mulier, gemescit egens: Gendered Discourses of Care during the Later Middle Ages

SESSION IV: (IN)FERTILITY AND REPRODUCTION
Chair: Ursula Gießmann (Univ. of Cologne)

11:45-12:30: Catherine Rider (Univ. of Exeter): Gender, Old Age, and the Infertile Body in Medieval Medicine

12:30-13:30: Lunch

13:30-14:15: Lauren Wood (Univ. of California): Si Non Caste Tamen Caute: Contraception and Abortion in the Middle Ages

14:15-15:00: Ayman Yasin Atat (TU Braunschweig): Dealing with Menstrual Disorders in Arabic/Ottoman Medicine

15:00-15:30: Concluding discussion

Journée d’étude – « Soigner au Moyen Âge », le 9 janvier 2018 à l’espace Mendès France de Poitiers

Soigner au Moyen Âge

9 Janvier 2018 à  10 h 00

POITIERS (86) | Espace Mendès France

Journée d’études sous la direction scientifique de Laurence Moulinier-Brogi, professeur d’histoire médiévale, université Lumière-Lyon 2, membre du CIHAM-UMR 5648.

9h30 – Accueil

10h-10h30 – Mot de bienvenue par Didier Moreau, directeur de l’Espace Mendès France et introduction par Martin Aurell, directeur du Centre d’études supérieures de civilisation médiévale (CESCM), université de Poitiers et Laurence Moulinier-Brogi

10h30-11h15Les formes de la relation patient-médecin au Moyen Âge par Marilyn Nicoud, professeur d’Histoire médiévale, université d’Avignon et des Pays du Vaucluse, CIHAM-UMR 5648

11h15-11h30 – Questions

11h30-12h15Soigner du poison à la fin du Moyen Âge. Des écrits spécialisés ? par Franck Collard, professeur d’Histoire médiévale, université Paris-Nanterre, CHISCO-EA 1587

12h15-12h30 – Questions

12h30 – Déjeuner

14h-14h45Le rôle du vin dans la médecine médiévale par Azélina Jaboulet-Vercherre, docteur en Histoire, EPHE, IVe Section, Visiting Professor, IEP, Paris

14h45-15h – Questions

15h-15h45Soigner et transmettre au XIIe siècle : « magister Egidius » par Mireille Ausécache, docteur en Histoire, EPHE, IVe Section

15h45-16h – Questions

16h-16h15 – Pause

16h15-17hErreurs médicales, échecs et tromperies par Laurence Moulinier-Brogi, professeur d’histoire médiévale, université Lumière-Lyon 2, membre du CIHAM-UMR 5648

17h15-17h30 – Conclusion

En partenariat avec le Centre d’études supérieures de civilisation médiévale (CESCM) de l’université de Poitiers dans le cadre de l’Atelier interdisciplinaire.

Information à retrouver sur le site web de l’espace Mendès France.

CFP – Brussels Medieval Culture and War Conference: Power, Authority, and Normativity – Université Saint-Louis of Bruxelles, 24–26 May 2018

Brussels Medieval Culture and War Conference: Power, Authority, and Normativity

Université Saint-Louis – Bruxelles
24–26 May 2018

An omnipresent phenomenon, war was a dominant social fact that impacted every aspect of society in the Middle Ages. Moving away from so-called ‘histoire-bataille’ that studied war on its own as an isolated succession of battles, studies have moved towards investigation of the reciprocal relationships between military conflicts and the economic, legal, political, religious, and social spheres in the Middle Ages.

Capture d_écran 2017-12-16 à 18.05.18

After previous meetings held at the University of Leeds in 2016 and the University of Lisbon in 2017, the 2018 edition of the ‘Medieval Culture and War Conference’ will take place at the Saint-Louis University, Brussels, and will focus on the theme of ‘Power, Authority, and Normativity’. We particularly welcome papers that discuss how medieval warfare, through the organisation, the techniques, and the discourses it mobilised, contributed to the shaping of power and power relationships, and how these power relations, in turn, could influence the adoption of certain forms of military organisation and techniques of warfare; how it related to the concept of authority; and how it was regulated by changing sets of rules over the period. How did power relationships, ideas about authority, and evolving norms have an impact on medieval warfare in theory and in practice? Interdisciplinary approaches from various theoretical backgrounds (e.g. archaeologi- cal, art historical, historical, literary, or sociological perspectives) are encouraged.

Subjects may include, but are not limited to:

  • Theory, doctrine, and ideology of war
  • War, propaganda, and rulership
  • Law and legislation on warfare
  • Literature on war and chivalry
  • Chivalric ethos and military discipline
  • Military justice and violence
  • Military organisation and logistics
  • Warfare and religion
  • Gender and war
  • Fortifications, weaponry, and technology
  • Real and imagined relations between combatants and non-combatants
  • Ideas of ‘Others’ and ‘Otherness’ in warfare
  • Funding of warfare

The conference, organised by the Research Centre for the include keynote presentations by Justine Firnhaber-Baker (University of St Andrews) and Bertrand Schnerb (Université Lille 3). The working language for the conference is English. Please submit an abstract of 250–300 words for a twenty-minute paper, or a proposal for a thematic session of three twenty-minute papers, with a short biography of 150 words, to brusselscultureandwar@gmail.com by 31 January 2018. Contributions from postgraduates and early career researchers are encouraged. A publication of selected proceedings is planned.

 

Brussels Organisation Commi ee: Eric Bousmar (Université Saint-Louis – Bruxelles), Michael Depreter (Université libre de Bruxelles/Université Saint-Louis – Bruxelles), Philippe Desmette (Université Saint-Louis – Bruxelles), Gilles Lecuppre (Université catholique de Louvain), and Quentin Verreycken (Université catholique de Louvain/Université Saint-Louis – Bruxelles).

In conjunction with the Leeds Executive Organisation Committee and the Lisbon Organisation Committee.

For more information visit their website: cultureandwarconference.wordpress.com/.

CFP – Borderlines XXII : sickness, strife and suffering – Queen’s university Belfast – 13-15th April 2018

Queen’s university Belfast presents : Borderlines XXII : sickness, strife and suffering – 13-15th April 2018

We are pleased to invite abstract of ca. 250 words related to pain in the middle ages. Topics may include but are not limited to :

  • collective pain
  • depictions of pain,
  • explanations of pain,
  • judicial literature,
  • medical literature,
  • memory and pain,
  • narratives of suffering,
  • pain and creativity,
  • pain and pleasure,
  • psychological pain,
  • social pain,
  • religious literature,
  • suffering in the afterlife

Please send abstracts of ca. 250 words, along with a short academic biography, to borderlinesxxii@gmail.com

The deadline for abstracts is 5th February 2018.

 

More info on the Bordrelines XXII website.

CFP – Canadian Society for the History of Medicine (CSHM) 2018 / Société canadienne d’histoire de la médecine 2018 – May 26-28, University of Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

Call for Papers: Canadian Society for the History of Medicine (CSHM) 2018

Call for Papers Canadian Society for the History of Medicine (CSHM) 2018 – Deadline 8 December 2017
May 26-28, University of Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

The CSHM will hold its annual meeting and conference on May 26-28 at the University of Regina, in conjunction with the Congress of the Humanities and Social Sciences. The Programme Committee calls for papers that address the theme of this year’s Congress: “Gathering Diversities.”

Scholars are invited to give papers related to diversity in the history of medicine, health and healing; or that address historical experiences of patient diversity and equity (gender, race, sexuality, ability). Proposals on topics unrelated to the Congress theme are also welcome.

Please submit an abstract and one-page CV for consideration by 20 November 2017 by e-mail to Esyllt Jones, esyllt.jones@umanitoba.ca. Abstracts must not exceed 350 words. We encourage proposals for organised panels of three (3) related papers; in this case, please submit a panel proposal of less than 350 words in addition to an abstract and one-page CV from each presenter. The Committee will notify applicants of its decision by December 15, 2017. Those who accept an invitation to present at the meeting agree to provide French and English versions of the accepted abstract for inclusion in the bilingual Program Book.


Appel de présentations, Société canadienne d’histoire de la médecine (SCHM) 2018 –APPEL A CONTRIBUTION JUSQU’AU 8 DÉCEMBRE
Le 26-28 mai, Université de Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada

La SCHM tiendra son congrès annuel le 26-28 mai à l’Université de Regina, dans le cadre du Congrès des sciences humaines. Le comité du programme fait un appel de présentations sur le thème du congrès cette année : « Rassembler les diversités ».

Les chercheurs sont invités à offrir une présentation se rapportant à la diversité dans l’histoire de la médecine, de la santé et de la guérison, ou qui considère des exemples historiques de diversité et d’équité chez les patients (sexe, race, sexualité, capacité). Les présentations sur des thèmes sans rapport avec le thème du Congrès sont également les bienvenues.

Veuillez envoyer un résumé et un CV d’une page pour examen avant le 20 novembre 2017 par courriel à Esyllt Jones, esyllt.jones@umanitoba.ca. Les résumés ne doivent pas dépasser 350 mots. Nous encourageons les propositions de présentations en groupes de trois (3) documents connexes; pour ces cas, veuillez soumettre une proposition de table ronde de moins de 350 mots en plus d’un résumé et d’un CV d’une page pour chaque présentateur. Le Comité avisera les demandeurs de sa décision d’ici le 15 décembre 2017. Ceux qui acceptent l’invitation à présenter au congrès s’engagent à fournir des versions française et anglaise du résumé qu’ils ont soumis pour l’inclusion dans le programme bilingue du congrès.

Plus d’info sur le site des organisateurs.

CFP – Monstrous Monarch/Royal Monsters at MAP 2018 in Las Vegas, April 12-15.

CFP for Monstrous Monarch/Royal Monsters at MAP 2018 in Las Vegas, NV April 12-15.

Organised by Medieval Association of the Pacific, the Rocky Mountain Medieval and the Renaissance Association

Medieval and early modern societies defined monstrosity in a multitude of ways, assigning the term to figures representing the supernatural “other” and to those representing human alterities. Monsters filled the national consciousness of societies throughout the medieval and early modern worlds. Indeed, the monster became an allegory for a society’s relativisms and fears. So, what happens when the monster is the monarch him or herself—or when the monster is a member of the royal family? How might the term be defined differently or specifically for the sake of this unique person? What special circumstances might be attached to the term and its parameters when the monarch and his or her relationship to the State and its people is concerned? Monarchs of the medieval and early modern periods were deeply concerned about their legacies, and prioritized the public memory of their reigns and dynasties very highly. Similarly, literary and artistic representations of royalty and monarchs often showcase the concerns of dynasty, heredity, and reputation. How is public memory affected when the monarch, or a member of a royal dynasty, is remembered as monstrous for posterity? Moreover, how is royal legacy affected when the term “monster” becomes attached to the monarch while he or she is still living?

MEARCSTAPA invites proposals in all disciplines of the humanities and for all nations, regions, language groups, and cultures of the medieval and early modern periods globally. Please send proposals of 250 words maximum to Asa Mittman asmittman@csuchico.edu, Thea Tomaini tmtomaini@gmail.com, and Ilan Mitchell-Smith Ilan.mitchellsmith@csulb.edu by 14 November 2017.

CFP – ‘The Others’ – Deviants, Outcasts and Outsiders in Archaeology – publication in Archaeological Review from Cambridge Department of Archaeology.

Archaeological Review from Cambridge Department of Archaeology.

‘The Others’ — Deviants, Outcasts and Outsiders in Archaeology

Volume 33.2 November 2018

Theme editors: Leah Damman and Samantha Leggett

Throughout human history, groups have met and interacted; this has a tendency to give rise to othering behaviours, ethnic discourses and a myriad of identity related issues. But what is the archaeological signature of ‘the Others’? Archaeological literature is full of examples of ‘deviant’ practices, and modern constructs? This volume seeks submissions that discuss these ideas and explore concept of identity, otherness, deviancy, ethnicity and exclusion in archaeology.

How we define nations and nth-oral groups, and what is designated as outside of or ‘Other’ is important to consider now more than ever; especially considering recent global political events. The increasing study of identity and archaeology in recent decades is predominantly concerned with labels and traditional discourses. How we define. protect and preserve the cultural heritage of non-Western and marginalized cultural groups should also be considered. The aim of this volume is to give a voice to the ‘Others’ of the past but also to be critical of our own theory and practice when it comes to socio.cultural definitions and studying identity in the past.

Volume 33.2 of the Archaeological Review from Cambridge provides a forum to facilitate discussion surrounding the unusual treatment of selected persons in the past, understanding that this could provide and concepts of eschatological fate. This volume seeks submissions that discuss these ideas and explore concepts of identity, otherness, deviancy, ethnicity and exclusion in archaeology. Papers integrating archaeology with other subjects such as history anthropology, ethnography or sociology are thus also encouraged. Contributions might explore, although are not limited to, the following topics:

▪  Theories and identification of Otherness, deviancy and alterity

▪ Deviant burial customs and mortuary practices Performing ethnicity and forming identities

▪ Minority group archaeology

▪ Outsiders and the other in cultural heritage

▪ Colonial and post-colonial perspectives

Papers of no more than 4000 words should be submitted to Leah Damman (ld431@cam.ac.uk), and Samantha Leggett (sal78@cam.ac.uk), any time before 1 March 2018, for publication in November 2018. Potential contributors are encouraged to register interest early by either submitting an abstract of up to 250 words or contacting the editors to further discuss their ideas.

More information about the Archaeological Review from Cambridge, including back issues and submission guidelines on the review website.

CFP – Interdisciplinary Approaches to the Study of Healing Charms and Medicine Harvard University, April 6-8, 2018

Charms (understood as ritual means of addressing situations of sickness, stress, and anxiety by way of a combination of special language and special actions) are universal across human societies. Early manuscripts in Latin and various vernacular languages contain several examples of healing charms that blur the lines between magic and science. Medical thinking informs literary production worldwide, from its ancient beginnings to modern times. In the present day, people routinely consult specialists in naturopathy, Ayurveda, and traditional Chinese medicine alongside, or in preference to, modern, scientific medicine.

Not only does the study of healing charms and other medical beliefs and practices have the potential to yield insight into traditional and historical systems of knowledge, but such study often has major implications for modern medicine. Charms can lead to the development of new medication and procedures, as when researchers from the University of Nottingham discovered that a charm from the 9th century Anglo Saxon manuscript “Bald’s Leechbook” proved effective in eradicating strains of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. Pharmaceutical companies spend significant amount of money on researching the traditional pharmocopiae of indigenous cultures across the planet in order to develop new drugs.

Because of the broad nature of this topic, this conference aims to bring together researchers whose work spans a broad range of areas, time periods, and disciplinary approaches. The nature of this conference brings together the study of medicine, science, and religion, thereby bridging gaps between disciplines and uncovering connections between the traditions of various cultures.

 

The Department of Celtic Languages and Literatures, Harvard University, with support from the Committee for the Provostial Fund for the Arts and Humanities, is proud to host “Interdisciplinary Approaches to the Study of Healing Charms and Medicine,” an interdisciplinary conference to be held at Harvard University from April 6-8, 2018, which aims to present innovative and cross-disciplinary approaches to the study of healing charms and medicine across a wide range of cultures and geographic areas, from antiquity up to the modern period.

Keynote speakers will be Dr. Jacqueline Borsje (University of Amsterdam) and Prof. Richard Kieckhefer (Northwestern University).

We invite proposals for papers on any aspect of the study of healing charms and traditional medicine, in any time period or location, from any disciplinary approach, including, but not limited to, folklore, history of science, medieval studies, religious studies, medicine, and anthropology.

Papers should be 20 minutes long, with a 10 minute period following the paper for questions. Proposals should include a title, an abstract of 200-300 words, and a short speaker biography, and should be sent to hcm@fas.harvard.edu. Please send submissions either in the body of the email or as an attached word document.

Abstracts due Tuesday October 25th, 2017

 

Mor info on the conference website.