Archives par mot-clé : Medieval attitudes

New publication – Premodern Dis/ability history. A Companion – Didymos pub.

Cordula Nolte, Bianca Frohne, Uta Halle, Sonja Kerth (Eds): A Handbook of Pre-Modern Dis/ability History (Didymos)

 

 

Pre-order here

 

« Covering the period from 500 to 1800, this volume serves as a comprehensive guide into the growing field of dis/ability history. Its contributions by 80 international scholars present groundbreaking research in various historical disciplines, often unearthing hitherto unknown material and highlighting premodern societies from unfamiliar perspectives. The wide range of approaches and subjects comprises theoretical and methodological frameworks, general questions of gender, life-cycle and social status, daily life experiences,work and sustenance, legal norms and practices, strategies of coping and of self-help, medical therapies, organisation of care, emotions and religious interpretations. Compact information, vivid case studies and rich visual material grant an enjoyable and instructive reading for audiences who wish to explore premodern culture on innovative paths. »

 

Since the turn of the century, dis/ability history has been established as a promising, international field of research that enables us to look at historical cultures and societies from a completely new point of view, based on the analytical category of dis/ability. The number of relevant projects and publications is growing, methods and topics are in constant development. At the same time, various intersections with different current approaches within historical scholarship and cultural studies emerge. The combination of these aspects turns the attention of the academia and the wider public to this new research perspective.
However, there is hardly any information available about the self-conception of dis/ability history, about its theories, methods and sources, and about its specific aims, subjects and leading questions. Whereas international dis/ability studies, which laid the groundwork for dis/ability history, have already put forth several handbooks, introductions and readers, dis/ability history is still in need of reference works wherein its basics are presented in a concise, readable, and systematic fashion.
This deficit is especially noticeable with regard to pre-modern dis/ability history, which is even more recent than modern dis/ability history, and where particular challenges have to be met, mainly due to the specifics of medieval and early modern sources. As there has been considerable output within a growing number of essays and edited volumes, but not often in form of monographs yet, it is quite difficult to keep track of research activities and to gain advanced insight into central fields of research.

This is where our handbook comes in. It addresses a diverse audience, including students and renowned scholars as well as interest groups, activists within the fields of politics, culture, education and social work who advocate empowerment and work towards social inclusion, as well as the general public with an interest in history.
The handbook aims to present the current state of research with regard to various disciplines, combining concise information with an accessible presentation based on primary sources and an arrangement of topics that captivates the reader’s interest.

The handbook

  • values interdisciplinarity: topics will be addressed by various disciplines, especially history, literary studies and linguistics, archaeology, anthropology, art history, sociology, religious studies, and theology.
  • brings together international authors (about 80 contributors).
  • is based on primary sources throughout.
  • explicitly addresses controversies regarding different research tendencies and methodologies.
  • combines diachronic and synchronic perspectives, applying a perspective of longue durée whenever possible.
  • entails articles in English and German (the latter being accompanied by English summaries).

 

Didymos-Verlag

Lange Straße 11 · D-71563 Affalterbach

Postfach 11 08 · D-71561 Affalterbach

Tel +49 71 44 › 26 11 791 · Fax +49 71 44 › 26 11 792

für Bestellungen / for orders

info@didymos-verlag.de · www.didymos-verlag.de

More infos on the Homo debilis Creative Unite website

Colloquium – Must see panels at IMCL – 3-6 July 2017 – ‘Otherness’

Colloquium – Must see panels at IMCL – 3-6 July 2017 – on ‘Otherness’

Please, feel free to contact us if you are giving a speech on something close to disability history that we miss.

Session 1018
Title Exceptionally Healthy?: Exploring Disease, Disfigurement, and Disability as the Norm in Medieval Culture
Date/Time Wednesday 5 July 2017: 09.00-10.30
Sponsor Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Research (MEMO), Swansea University / Wellcome ‘Effaced’ Project, Swansea University
Organiser Patricia E. Skinner, Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Research (MEMO), Swansea University
Moderator/Chair Elma Brenner, Wellcome Library, London
Paper 1018-a Epilepsy and Otherness: The Prophet and His Detractors
(Language: English)
Hillary Burgardt, Department of Classics, Ancient History & Egyptology, Swansea University
Index Terms: Medicine; Rhetoric; Sermons and Preaching; Social History
Paper 1018-b ‘Normality’ and the ‘Other’ at the End of the World: Sickness and Disability in the Passio Olavi
(Language: English)
Karl Christian Alvestad, Department of History, University of Winchester
Index Terms: Medicine; Religious Life; Social History
Paper 1018-c Looking Strange: A Positive Asset?
(Language: English)
Patricia E. Skinner, Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Research (MEMO), Swansea University
Index Terms: Medicine; Religious Life; Social History
Abstract Engaging with the problematic category ‘others’, this sessions takes as its starting point the sheer ubiquity of sick, disfigured and disabled persons in medieval narrative and legal texts, and ask whether it is tenable to propose good health as a ‘normal’ human state between 500 and 1500CE. The panellists take a queer view that challenges the paradigmatic position of those who were sick, disfigured or incapacitated as excluded or ‘on the margins’, and instead illustrates the necessity of inclusion of these groups in discourses of power and piety.
Session 1110
Title ‘For I am a woman, ignorant, weak, and frail’: Feminising Death and Disease in the Later Middle Ages
Date/Time Wednesday 5 July 2017: 11.15-12.45
Organiser Victoria Baker, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Rachael Gillibrand, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Moderator/Chair Rachael Gillibrand, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Paper 1110-a Death and the Maiden: Exploring the Feminisation of Death
(Language: English)
Victoria Baker, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Index Terms: Daily Life; Gender Studies
Abstract Within late medieval society, to be valued was to look and behave according to the societal ‘norm’ – dependency was largely represented as a feminine trait, whereas to be independent was to be masculine. How then did medieval people respond to deviations from these gendered expectations as a result of death (or dying) and chronic diseases? This session will consider the feminisation of death and disease through an interdisciplinary lens, in order to answer questions about the perceived ‘feminine’ dependency of the marginal ‘third state’ between being fully healthy and fully sick (i.e. to be dying or diseased). It will consider the contradictory nature of disease and the female response to death and disease as elements of daily life which were (largely) out of their control; the effect of death, disability, and disease on medieval constructions of masculinity; and whether – if death and disease dehumanise the body – is it even important to consider the effect of these states on an individual’s gendered identity?
Session 1118
Title Social Exclusion: Leprosy, Madness, and Wardrobe Malfunctions
Date/Time Wednesday 5 July 2017: 11.15-12.45
Organiser IMC Programming Committee
Moderator/Chair Patricia E. Skinner, Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Research (MEMO), Swansea University
Paper 1118-a The Transitory Convention of Madness in Arthurian Literature
(Language: English)
Erwann Hollevoet, Faculteit Letteren, KU Leuven / Group for Early Modern Studies, Universiteit Gent
Index Terms: Language and Literature – Middle English; Medicine; Philosophy; Social History
Paper 1118-b Clothing as a Means of Exclusion in Wolfram’s Parzival
(Language: English)
Alissa Theiss, Institut für Deutsche Philologie des Mittelalters, Philipps-Universität Marburg
Index Terms: Daily Life; Gender Studies; Language and Literature – German; Mentalities
Paper 1118-c ‘…with fleschelie lust sa maculait…’: Leprosy as Otherness in R. Henryson’s Testament of Cresseid
(Language: English)
Maria Luisa Maggioni, Dipartimento di Scienze linguistiche e letterature straniere, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Milano
Index Terms: Language and Literature – Middle English; Religious Life
Abstract Paper -a:
When Jacques Derrida in Cogito and the History of Madness denounced Michel Foucault’s project of providing the madman with a voice as the ‘greatest merit but also the very infeasibility of his book’ on the basis of its reliance on the reason-dominated language of philosophical tradition, he could have irrevocably silenced those madmen that have been exclusionary prohibited from participating within our constitutively reasonable society. However, there are other types of language that escape the constitutive dominance of reason and periods of history that preclude the exclusion of madness by reason and thus allow the true voice of madness to be heard. The voice of madness is not merely awakened in Arthurian literature; it also reveals the performative construction of medieval identificatory categories, as madness functions as a transitory literary convention within the construction of Arthurian knightly identity.

Paper -b:
In Wolfram of Eschenbach’s Parzival the young and naive Parzival sets forth for fame and fortune wearing a fool’s dress made by his mother. His clothing mirrors his manners. Due to Parzival’s foolish behaviour Lady Jeschute is being punished and humiliated without cause by her husband. She is no longer allowed to change her clothes. Parzival’s dress and Jeschute’s torn clothing are tantamount to a divestiture. The actions of Parzival, dressed up like a villain, lead to Jeschute becoming an outlaw herself. Lacking appropriate clothing she cannot take part in courtly society any longer. When eventually Parzival is able to prove her innocence, Jeschute’s re-entry into society is marked by being cloaked with her husband’s surcoat.

Paper -c:
‘Mass illnesses – from syphilis to cholera, from the Black Death to leprosy – have been linked to otherness both historically and cross-culturally’ (Yardley, 2013). In R. Henryson’s poem The Testament of Cresseid (mid-15th century) the protagonist’s punishment for her blasphemy is leprosy. This makes her a symbol for sexually transmitted diseases (in accordance with medieval belief) and for the persecuted and marginalized victim. The dramatic physical changes Cressida undergoes, which mark the beginning of her conversion, also cause her estrangement from her previous life. In order to highlight the connotative value of the vocabulary chosen by the Henryson, this study focuses on the linguistic means chosen by the Scottish poet to describe Cressida’s downfall and her becoming ‘other’ both physically and psychologically.

 

Session 1218
Title Leprosy and Power in the High Middle Ages
Date/Time Wednesday 5 July 2017: 14.15-15.45
Sponsor Graduate Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Reading
Organiser Katie Phillips, Graduate Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Reading
Moderator/Chair Elma Brenner, Wellcome Library, London
Paper 1218-a From Heinrich to Tristan: The Changing Function of Lepers in Middle High German Literature
(Language: English)
Madelon Köhler-Busch, Department of Humanities, University of Wisconsin-Platteville
Index Terms: Canon Law; Language and Literature – German; Pagan Religions; Social History
Paper 1218-b ‘The Conspicuous Patron of Lepers’?: Lepers and the King in the 12th and Early 13th Centuries
(Language: English)
Paul Webster, School of History, Archaeology & Religion, Cardiff University
Index Terms: Medicine; Politics and Diplomacy; Religious Life
Paper 1218-c Locus (in)honestus: Early Franciscan Attitudes towards the Leper Hospital
(Language: English)
Edward Sutcliffe, Department of Religion & Theology, University of Bristol
Index Terms: Ecclesiastical History; Hagiography; Religious Life
Abstract The papers in this session will explore the relationship between lepers and authority, focussing particularly on England and France in the central Middle Ages. The complex and ambiguous perceptions of the disease resulted in similarly complicated responses, both towards individuals diagnosed with leprosy, and towards groups of lepers living in dedicated leper houses. The session will explore the way in which lepers may have used their diagnosis to their advantage, and perhaps exploited their ‘Otherness’. In addition, the responses of kings and legal bodies are examined as a means of understanding contemporary reactions to leprosy.
Session 1240
Title Health and Medicine in the Early Medieval West, I: Situating Medical Texts and Practices
Date/Time Wednesday 5 July 2017: 14.15-15.45
Organiser Claire Burridge, Faculty of History, University of Cambridge
Zubin Mistry, School of History, Classics & Archaeology, University of Edinburgh
Moderator/Chair Claire Burridge, Faculty of History, University of Cambridge
Paper 1240-a The Female Patient, the Physician, and Medical Responsibility in Late Antiquity
(Language: English)
Caroline Musgrove, Faculty of Classics, University of Cambridge
Index Terms: Daily Life; Gender Studies; Medicine; Women’s Studies
Paper 1240-b Teraupetica (sic) : Manuscript Context and Christian Ideology in an Early Medieval Book of Medical Recipes
(Language: English)
Arsenio Ferraces-Rodríguez, Departamento de Letras, Universidade da Coruña
Index Terms: Manuscripts and Palaeography; Medicine; Theology
Paper 1240-c ‘Mirubalanus est genus coriote nascitur in egypto’: Mapping Pharmaceutical Provenance in Early Medieval Recipe Collections
(Language: English)
Jeffrey Doolittle, Department of History, Fordham University
Index Terms: Daily Life; Medicine
Abstract Despite important new work, early medieval medicine still remains quarantined from the mainstream of early medieval historiography. The aim of these sessions is to diagnose and treat this historiographical ‘otherness’ by using health and medicine as ways of exploring early medieval societies. This first session focuses on situating medical texts, traditions and practices. Papers will use medical texts to explore a range of questions including the relationship between practical medicine and Christian ideology, gender and medical practice, the nature of learning, and connections across space and time.
Session 1319
Title Body, Soul, and Otherness, II: Religious and Medical Definitions of Mental and Physical Difference
Date/Time Wednesday 5 July 2017: 16.30-18.00
Sponsor ‘The Body in the City’ Consortium & Trivium, Tampere Centre for Classical, Medieval & Early Modern Studies, University of Tampere
Organiser Jenni Kuuliala, School of Social Sciences & Humanities, University of Tampere
Moderator/Chair Gordon Whyte, School of Philosophical, Historical & International Studies, Monash University, Victoria
Paper 1319-a Demonic Possession and the Physical, Spiritual, and Social ‘Other’
(Language: English)
Sari Katajala-Peltomaa, School of Social Sciences & Humanities, University of Tampere
Index Terms: Hagiography; Lay Piety; Medicine; Mentalities
Paper 1319-b Effacing Demons: Ritual and Medical Care in Medieval Drama
(Language: English)
Andreea-Dana Marculescu, Department of Women’s & Gender Studies, University of Oklahoma
Index Terms: Language and Literature – French or Occitan; Lay Piety; Medicine; Mentalities
Paper 1319-c Sainthood, Physical Deviance, and Otherness in the Late Middle Ages
(Language: English)
Jenni Kuuliala, School of Social Sciences & Humanities, University of Tampere
Index Terms: Hagiography; Lay Piety; Medicine; Social History
Abstract Religion and medicine were in many ways intertwined in the Middle Ages, both in explaining deviance, illness, and impairment as well as in the healing practices. Religion and medicine also offered methods, which sometimes overlapped and sometimes contradicted each other, for cure and for ways to integrate deviant people back into a community. This session analyses healing as a cultural practice; the focal questions are how religious and medical explanations intermingled in the construction of ‘the Other’, and in what ways they complemented or competed in explaining, categorising, and treating different mental and bodily conditions.
Session 1340
Title Health and Medicine in the Early Medieval West, II: Beyond Medical Texts
Date/Time Wednesday 5 July 2017: 16.30-18.00
Organiser Claire Burridge, Faculty of History, University of Cambridge
Zubin Mistry, School of History, Classics & Archaeology, University of Edinburgh
Moderator/Chair Richard Sowerby, School of History, Classics & Archaeology, University of Edinburgh
Paper 1340-a Incorporating Palaeopathological Evidence in the Study of Early Medieval Health and Medicine
(Language: English)
Claire Burridge, Faculty of History, University of Cambridge
Index Terms: Archaeology – General; Daily Life; Medicine; Technology
Paper 1340-b Soul-Searching: Some Carolingian Answers
(Language: English)
Meg Leja, History Department, Binghamton University
Index Terms: Learning (The Classical Inheritance); Medicine; Theology
Paper 1340-c ‘There are three reasons why sterilitas affects women’: Thinking about Fertility in Carolingian Monasteries
(Language: English)
Zubin Mistry, School of History, Classics & Archaeology, University of Edinburgh
Index Terms: Biblical Studies; Gender Studies; Learning (The Classical Inheritance); Medicine
Abstract Despite important new work, early medieval medicine still remains quarantined from the mainstream of early medieval historiography. The aim of these sessions is to diagnose and treat this historiographical ‘otherness’ by using health and medicine as ways of exploring early medieval societies. This second session uses medical and non-medical texts to explore ideas about body and soul as well as non-textual approaches to investigate the health of early medieval populations.
Session 1508
Title Crusading, Identity, and Otherness, I: Women, Children, and the Old
Date/Time Thursday 6 July 2017: 09.00-10.30
Sponsor Northern Network for the Study of the Crusades
Organiser Kathryn Hurlock, Department of History, Politics & Philosophy, Manchester Metropolitan University
Sini Kangas, School of Social Sciences & Humanities, University of Tampere
Jason T. Roche, Department of History, Politics & Philosophy, Manchester Metropolitan University
Moderator/Chair Jason T. Roche, Department of History, Politics & Philosophy, Manchester Metropolitan University
Paper 1508-a The Young and The Old – Feeble Crusaders?: Age in the 12th- and 13th-Century Sources of the Crusades
(Language: English)
Sini Kangas, School of Social Sciences & Humanities, University of Tampere
Index Terms: Crusades; Pagan Religions
Paper 1508-b Women and Children as Victims of the Baltic Crusades: A Case of ‘Ritual Violence’?
(Language: English)
Torben Kjersgaard Nielsen, Institut for Kultur og Globale Studier / Cultural Encounters in Pre-Modern Societies, Aalborg Universitet
Index Terms: Crusades; Pagan Religions
Paper 1508-c The Damascene Frontier, 1099-1128: Frankish / Turkish Conflict and Peacemaking during the Post-First Crusade Era
(Language: English)
Nicholas E. Morton, School of Arts & Humanities, Nottingham Trent University
Index Terms: Crusades; Military History
Abstract In the first of a series of linked sessions on the interrelated themes of crusading, identity, and otherness, Sini Kangas explores the understanding of youth and old age in the 12th- and 13th-century chronicles and chansons of the Crusades, showing how age is employed to shed light on specific contexts, offer additional information, and emphasise small but important details. Tørben Nielsen discusses the Christian expansion in pagan Livonia and Estonia between the years 1184 and 1227 as reported in the Chronicon Livoniae, and seeks to understand why women and children appear repeatedly in the text as the numberless and nameless victims of the crusading warfare. Nic Morton considers the Damascene frontier during the first three decades of the 12th century, and explains why the city’s ruler, Tughtakin, was reluctant to risk a direct confrontation with the newly established Frankish settlers.
Session 1625
Title Apocalyptic Alterity: Otherness and the End Times
Date/Time Thursday 6 July 2017: 11.15-12.45
Organiser Brett E. Whalen, Department of History, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Moderator/Chair Felicitas Schmieder, Historisches Institut, FernUniversität Hagen
Respondent James Palmer, St Andrews Institute of Mediaeval Studies, University of St Andrews
Paper 1625-a Everybody Wants to Rule the World: Crusading Soldiers of Christ at the End of Time
(Language: English)
Matthew Gabriele, Department of Religion & Culture, Virginia Technical Institute
Index Terms: Crusades; Historiography – Medieval; Theology
Paper 1625-b Church, Empire, and Apocalypse in the 13th Century
(Language: English)
Brett E. Whalen, Department of History, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Index Terms: Ecclesiastical History; Historiography – Medieval; Political Thought
Paper 1625-c Heavenly Hermaphrodites: Sexual Difference and the End of Time
(Language: English)
Leah DeVun, Department of History, Rutgers University, New Jersey
Index Terms: Gender Studies; Historiography – Medieval; Sexuality
Abstract Medieval Europe’s apocalyptic imagination provided a compelling field of ideas, texts, and images for Christians to project and contest the norms of their society, framed by the envisioned progress of time from its beginning to its end. This proposed panel will explore some of the ways that apocalyptic and eschatological views of salvation history informed attitudes towards the ‘self’ and ‘others’, past, present, and future, shaping religious, political, and sexual identities. The papers and commentary will also suggest some of the ways that studies of apocalypticism during the Middle Ages have changed over recent years, looking past long-standing debates and issues in the field (e.g. the year 1000, the radical nature of millennialism) to embrace new questions and problems relating to the significance of the apocalypse for medieval intellectual life, society, and spirituality.

 

All Leeds infos here !

CFP « Re-imagining the Christian Body » Univ. Turku (Finland) 2-3 Nov. ’17.

Re-imagining the Christian Body
Interdisciplinary Conference University of Turku 2-3 November 2017

 
This conference concentrates on the ways in which the human body has been imagined and re-imagined in different Christian cultures at different times from Late Antiquity to present day. In Christianity the human body is often perceived as a privileged site not only for the God-Man relationship but also for the formation of and relationships within and between, communities of believers. These perceptions emerge from and generate different imaginaries of the body. Imagination can be understood as a human faculty that in many ways plays a central part in people’s religious lives and experiences. The notion does not imply something that is false or untrue but rather denotes the ways people go about constituting and perceiving their lived world and their immanent and transcendent environments and relationships. Therefore, Christian imaginaries of the body are not static but depend on the Christian culture in question and are subject to negotiation and change. They also are often central to religious schisms and conflicts but shared imaginaries of the body also have the capacity to unite.

This conference focuses especially upon changes and alterations: how and why does the Christian body become re-imagined in different Christian cultures? What is the role of such imaginations of the body in religious practice, art, museums, and science, for example? What are the methods and technologies for imagining the body in these contexts? What ethical and other consequences do different imaginations of the body and alterations in them have for Christians and for society at large?

 

Keynote speakers in the conference are:

Bonnie Effros, Department of History, University of Florida http://history.ufl.edu/directory/current-faculty/bonnie-effros/

Annelin Eriksen, Department of Social Anthropology, University of Bergen http://www.uib.noien/persons/Annelin.Eriksen
We encourage submissions from different disciplines and from a variety of perspectives. Potential topics include, but are not restricted, to the following:

  • Historical imaginations of the body
  • Saints and relics
  • Body and identity
  • Gender, sexuality and imagination
  • Illness and health
  • Power and authority in limiting or expanding the imagination of bodies
  • Body in religious art
  • Christian utopias and dystopias and the body
  • Limits of imagining the body
  • Methods, practices and technologies for imagining the body
  • Epistemology and imagination of the body
  • Imagination as researcher’s tool

Proposals for individual papers should be sent to cscc@utu.fi by 20 June 2017. Please include in the submission a paper abstract of no more than 250 words and your name, affiliation and e-mail address.

Notifications of abstract acceptance will be sent by June 30.

The conference fee is 50 euros (reduced fee available for graduate students). This covers the programme, coffees and banquet on Thursday evening.

Conference homepage can be found at: reimagining.utu.fi.

The conference is organised by the Turku Institute for Advanced Studies (TIAS), the Centre for the Study of Christian Cultures (CSCC) and the Turku Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies (TUCEM EMS).

Demons and Illness from Antiquity to the Early-Modern Period

Demons and Illness from Antiquity to the Early-Modern Period

Edited by Siam Bhayro and Catherine Rider, University of Exeter, Brill edition.

Table of contents

Introduction, Siam Bhayro and Catherine Rider
Antiquity
Shifting Alignments: The Dichotomy of Benevolent and Malevolent Demons in Mesopotamia, Gina Konstantopoulos
The Natural and Supernatural Aspects of Fever in Mesopotamian Medical Texts, András Bácksay
Illness as Divine Punishment: The Nature and Function of the Disease-Carrier Demons in the Ancient Egyptian Magical Texts, Rita Lucarelli
Demons at Work in Ancient Mesopotamia, Lorenzo Verderame
Late Antiquity
Demons and Illness in Second Temple Judaism: Theory and Practice, Ida Fröhlich
Illness and Healing through Spell and Incantation in the Dead Sea Scrolls, David Hamidović
Conceptualizing Demons in Late Antique Judaism, Gideon Bohak
Oneiric Aggressive Magic: Sleep Disorders in Late Antique Jewish Tradition, Alessia Bellusci
The Influence of Demons on the Human Mind According to Athenagoras and Tatian, Chiara Crosignani
Demonic Anti-Music and Spiritual Disorder in the Life of Antony, Sophie Sawicka-Sykes
Over-eating Demoniacs in Late Antique Hagiography, Sophie Lunn-Rockliffe
Medieval
Miracles and Madness: Dispelling Demons in Twelfth-Century Hagiography, Anne E. Bailey
Demons in Lapidaries? The Evidence of the Madrid MS Escorial, h. I. 15., Carolina Escobar-Vargas
The Melancholy of the Necromancer in Arnau de Vilanova’s Epistle against Demonic Magic, Sebastià Giralt
Demons, Illness and Spiritual Aids in Natural Magic and Image Magic, Lauri Ockenström
Between Medicine and Magic: Spiritual Aetiology and Therapeutics in Medieval Islam, Liana Saif
Demons, Saints, and the Mad in the Twelfth-Century Miracles of Thomas Becket, Claire Trenery
Early Modernity
The Post-Reformation Challenge to Demonic Possession, Harman Bhogal
From A Discoverie to The Triall of Witchcraft: Doctor Cotta and Godly John, Pierre Kapitaniak
Healing with Demons? Preternatural Philosophy and Superstitious Cures in Spanish Inquisitorial Courts, Bradley J. Mollmann
Afterword: Pandaemonium, Peregrine Horden

 

CFP – Medieval Academy Graduate Students · The Program in Medieval Studies, Princeton University “Vulnerability in the Middle Ages”

Vulnerability in the Middle Ages

Princeton University, Medieval Academy Graduate Students

At a moment that has brought economic, political, and physical vulnerabilities (new and old) abruptly to the surface, we invite papers on the topic of vulnerability and insecurity in the Middle Ages. Recent scholarship in medieval poverty, gender, disability, and racial difference has greatly enhanced our sense of the variety of vulnerable experiences, and we seek to connect these conversations through their shared perspective on power. We welcome proposals from a variety of disciplines on vulnerability and the concepts that surround it, including weakness, insecurity, injury, disability, and difference. Papers might consider both the portrayal and the experience of the vulnerable life, as well as the systems that lead to vulnerability. We are interested both in the conditions that made individuals vulnerable within communities, and in those that threatened communities within larger polities. In a period where vulnerability typically precluded creating and maintaining records, unfamiliar readings of familiar sources are especially necessary, as are approaches that access vulnerable experiences in imaginative ways. Such approaches might challenge more conventional relationships between scholars and their objects of study, and ask how scholarship itself can perpetuate, create, or mitigate vulnerabilities in the past and present.

Some themes might include, but are not limited to:

– Contradictory perspectives on vulnerability (sympathy/revulsion, admiration/contempt)
– How difference (racial, gender, physical, economic, geographic) contributes to vulnerability
– Vulnerabilities specific to catastrophes, including war, famine, disease, and panic
– The relationship of systems of power to vulnerability
– The experience and portrayal of physical vulnerability
– The treatment (medical or otherwise) of vulnerable conditions
– Religious practices and perspectives on weakness
– “Vulnerability” in other words, such as vernacular translations and terminologies
– Documenting vulnerability and (materially, philologically, hermeneutically) vulnerable documents
– Populations vulnerable to scholarship, via origin or identity myths, institutions, and ideologies

Please submit your abstract (250 words) for a fifteen-minute presentation to the conference organizers (medievalvulnerabilities@gmail.com) by February 15th, 2017.

All abstracts should be in English, and include your name, contact information, and academic affiliation.

CFP – Lived religion and everyday life through earlymodern catholic hagiography – Finland Institute in Rome

Lived religion and everyday life through earlymodern catholic hagiography – Finland Institute in Rome

Final submission of articles: Autumn 2013

Studies on medieval social and cultural history have already for several decades demonstrated the rich possibilities hagiographic material can offer the historian interested in everyday life, lived religion and society. Since the late fifteenth century, this material has experienced an unprecedented growth in volume. Nevertheless. there is still a great need for studies on lived religion and everyday life portrayed through early modem catholic hagiographic material.

To address this need. we invite abstracts for contributions on the subject from scholars worthy with early modem (ca. 15km » centuries) hagiographic material. such as beatification and canonisation processes. other miracle accounts. art, vitae. and other spiritual (autobiographies. The aim is to produce a high-quality collection of articles, which offers cutting-edge and fruitful insights into early modern social and cultural history, using hagiographic texts and art as sources. We especially welcome communications, which have a sensitive approach to gender, age, health and social status.

The deadline for submitting abstracts is the end of February 2017. Twelve most promising abstracts will be selected. it funding cm be secured, the article drafts will be discussed it May 2018 in a workshop organised at the Finnish Institute in Rome (Vita Lante). The collection of articles will be submitted to an international publisher following the peer-review process soon after the meeting, in autumn 2018.

Suitable article topics for the collection will include. but are not limited to:

  • family and household, gender roles
  • health, body, dis/ability, illness, and cure
  • death and salvation
  • religious practices and materiality of religion
  • identity and community

    Please send an abstract of no more than 300 words for an English article and a short biography including name, affiliation and the most important publications, to earlymodernhagiography@gmail.com by Tuesday February 28th. 2017.

Editors and contact informations:
Jenni Kuuliala
PhD. Postdoctoral Researcher (Academy of Finland)
University of Tampere

Podcast – Musique et folie au Moyen Âge – Martine Clouzot

Musique et folie au Moyen Âge – Martine Clouzot

Un air d’histoire Par Karine Le Bail

Vivant décalé de la société, le musicien du Moyen Âge est un marginal. Sujet à instabilité et pauvreté, la folie lui est souvent associée par les instances religieuses, politiques, culturelles, et plus particulièrement encore dans les enluminures datant de 1200 à 1500, à destination des laïcs.

 

Lien du podcast:

https://www.francemusique.fr/emissions/un-air-d-histoire/musique-et-folie-au-moyen-age-par-martine-clouzot-30155

Lien Itunes:

https://itunes.apple.com/fr/podcast/un-air-dhistoire/id1150937219?mt=2&uo=4

 

Martine Clouzot, professeure en histoire du Moyen Âge à l’Université de Bourgogne à Dijon. Spécialisée notamment sur la question musicale et des « fous » de l’époque, elle a été co-commissaire de l’exposition « Moyen Âge, entre ordre et désordre », présentée en 2004 à la Cité de la Musique à Paris. Auteure de Musique, folie et nature au Moyen Âge. Les figurations du fou musicien dans les manuscrits enluminés (XIIIe-XVe s.), elle est notre invitée pour nous dévoiler une partie de cet univers riche, déconcertant et passionnant.
Vous pouvez retrouver sa biographie complète ici.

 

Plus d’informations sur le Podcast ici.

New publication – Coming soon : « Living with Disfigurement in Early Medieval Europe » by Patricia Skinner

51704299

Living with Disfigurement in Early Medieval Europe

by Patricia Skinner

This book examines social and medical responses to the disfigured face in early medieval Europe, arguing that the study of head and facial injuries can offer a new contribution to the history of early medieval medicine and culture, as well as exploring the language of violence and social interactions. Despite the prevalence of warfare and conflict in early medieval society, and a veritable industry of medieval historians studying it, there has in fact been very little attention paid to the subject of head wounds and facial damage in the course of war and/or punitive justice. The impact of acquired disfigurement —for the individual, and for her or his family and community—is barely registered, and only recently has there been any attempt to explore the question of how damaged tissue and bone might be treated medically or surgically. In the wake of new work on disability and the emotions in the medieval period, this study documents how acquired disfigurement is recorded across different geographical and chronological contexts in the period.

About the author: Patricia Skinner is Research Professor in Arts and Humanities at Swansea University, UK. She is the Director of the Effaced from History project, sponsored by the Wellcome Trust, and has previously published books on gender, medicine, and health, in addition to the social history of southern Italy.

Review (on the ditor website): “In this uncommonly refreshing contribution to the vibrant historical discourse on marginalisation, Skinner engages with current concerns beyond her chronological and thematic focus, while eschewing anachronism and reductionism. With ample evidence and spirited argument, she challenges widespread generalisations about past attitudes—and exposes persistent prejudices—towards the physically different.” (Luke Demaitre, Visiting Professor, Center for Biomedical Ethics and Humanities, University of Virginia, and author of “Leprosy in Premodern Medicine: A Malady of the Whole Body”)

 

More infos on the editor’s website

 

New publication – Childhood Disability and Social Integration in the Middle Ages, by Jenni Kuuliala

 See original image

 

Childhood Disability and Social Integration in the Middle Ages.

Constructions of Impairments in Thirteenth- and Fourteenth-Century Canonization Processes

by Jenni Kuuliala

 

In this volume, testimonies from medieval canonization processes are (for the first time) systematically used as sources for the study of medieval attitudes and everyday life concerning physical impairments, particularly of children.

This volume offers new insights into medieval disability studies by analysing miracle testimonies from canonization processes as sources for the study of medieval attitudes to and understanding of childhood physical impairments: how they were defined, and the social consequences of childhood disability on the family, on the community, and on children themselves.

In these texts, laypeople from different social groups carefully described events leading to children’s miraculous cures of physical impairments, as well as the conditions themselves. They thus provide an exceptionally rich (yet hitherto unexplored) window into the ways in which medieval society defined, explained, and understood children’s impairments.

Besides simply describing disabilities and miraculous cures, these testimonies also reveal various aspects of everyday experiences and communal attitudes towards impaired children. The few testimonies by the children themselves offer fascinating insights into personal experiences of physical disability and how disability affected a child’s socialization and the formation of identity.

This study thus aims to tease apart the often-complex ways in which medieval society both viewed physical differences and how it chose to (re)construct these differences in the discourse of the miraculous, as well as in everyday life.

 

Table of Contents

Introduction

Chapter 1: Family and the Conceptions of Impairment

Chapter 2: Community and the Impaired Child

Chapter 3: Reconstructing Lived Experience

Chapter 4: Conclusions: Impairment and Social Inclusion

Bibliography

 

Find more information on the editor’s bewsite

CFP – Histories of Healthy Ageing – University of Groningen, 21–23 June 2017

Histories of Healthy Ageing

University of Groningen, 21–23 June 2017

As Western populations grow increasingly older, ‘healthy ageing’ is presented as one of today’s greatest medical and societal challenges. However, contrary to what many policy makers want us to believe, the aspiration to live long, healthy and happy lives is not a problem specific to our times. On the contrary successful ageing has a long history.

The conference Histories of Healthy Ageing is based on the assumption that ‘healthy ageing’ has informed the medical agenda since Antiquity. With ‘healthy ageing’ we refer to ways of thinking about and treating the body not only from a medical perspective, but also taking into account questions of what constitutes a happy and fulfilled life. In particular these latter issues were central to medicine before 1800 and relate to healthy living as much as to questions connected specifically to old age. Thus whether we speak of classic ways of training the athlete’s body, medieval religious rites, the pre-modern obsession with regimen (rules for living a healthy life), or the upper-class fancy to visit spas, at the root of it all was a wish for wellbeing, health and longevity.

The conference focuses especially (but not exclusively) on the pre-modern period. Submissions for 20-minute papers should include a 250-word abstract and a short CV. Subject to funding small travel grants might be available for junior researchers.
Possible topics include:

  • Histories of diet and dietetics, ‘sports’, spas and bathing, medication and life-elixirs, etc.
  • The materiality of healthy living and ageing (pills, powders and elixirs, bath houses, exercise apparatus, scales and the like)
  • Aesthetics and the history of cosmetic surgery
  • Prognosis and historical efforts to chart life expectancy
  • Relations between patients and doctors
  • Ars Moriendi and resilience in the face of illness and death
  • Healthy living and ageing outside academic medicine (quacks, alchemy, homeopathy)
  • Narratives of ‘healthy ageing’
  • The philosophical question of what constitutes a long and happy life
  • Life cycles
  • The understanding and application of the six ‘non-naturals’
  • Healthy ageing and the arts

Keynote lectures:

At the conference 5 keynote lectures will centre on the non-naturals, the areas defined by Hippocratic writers as the basis of health management and disease prevention.

  • Food and Drink by Elizabeth Williams (Oklahoma State)
  • Exercise and Rest by Onno van Nijf (Groningen)
  • Sleep and Wakefulness by William Maclehose (UC London)
  • Excretion and Retention by Michael Stolberg (Würzburg)
  • Perturbations of the Mind and Emotions by Irena Metzler (Swansea)

In addition to these specialised lectures there will be a public lecture by Robert Zwijnenberg (Leiden University) on Pre-modern Healthy Ageing and Modern Bio-medical Art.
Exhibition

The conference will be accompanied by an exhibition in the Groningen University Museum and the University Medical Centre Groningen (UMCG).
It opens June 2017.
Conference Organisers: Rina Knoeff, Ruben Verwaal, Catrien Santing, James Kennaway, Rolf ter Sluis.

Submissions and queries should be sent to: historiesofhealthyageing@gmail.com

Call closes: 1 December 2016

Download the Call for Papers here.