Archives par mot-clé : ICMS Kalamazoo

Sessions on Disability History – The 52nd International Congress on Medieval Studies – campus of Western Michigan University – May 11-14, 2017.

Sessions on Disability History – The 52nd International Congress on Medieval Studies – campus of Western Michigan University – May 11-14, 2017.

 

Friday, May 12 – Evening Events
Society for the Study of Disability in the Middle Ages
=> Valley II, LeFevre Lounge Business Meeting

 

Friday 10 AM

214 – BERNHARD 210

Landscape Approaches to the Plague

Sponsor: Contagions: Society for Historic Infectious Disease Studies
Organizer: Michelle Ziegler, Independent Scholar
Presider: Philip Slavin, Univ. of Kent
1. Michelle Ziegler – Plague in the Sixth-Century Bavarian Landscape
2. Carenza Lewis, Univ. of Lincoln – 44.7%: New archaeological Evidence for the Impact of the Black Death in
England and Its Implications for Future Research
3. Fabian Crespo, Univ. of Louisville – Heterogeneous Immunological Landscapes and Medieval Plague

 

Saturday 10 AM
345 – VALLEY III ELDRIDGE 309
Piers Plowman and Disability
Sponsor: International Piers Plowman Society
Organizer: Curtis Gruenler, Hope College
Presider: Curtis Gruenler
1. Dana Roders, Purdue Univ. – Intersections of Disability and Sin in Piers Plowman
2. Laura Godfrey, Univ. of Connecticut – Must I Here-Wel to Do-Wel? Sensory Impairments in Piers Plowman
3. Richard H. Godden, Loyola Univ. New Orleans – Dismodern Will

 

Saturday 10 AM
393 – BERNHARD BROWN & GOLD ROOM
Fair Unknowns (A Roundtable)
Sponsor: Arthuriana
Organizer: Dorsey Armstrong, Purdue Univ./Arthuriana
Presider: Dorsey Armstrong,
1. Joseph M. Sullivan, Univ. of Oklahoma – What’s So Interesting About Fair Unknown Romances in Germanic Arthurian Literatures?
2. Kevin J. Harty, La Salle Univ. – Rescued from the Archives: The Fair Unknown on CBS TV in 1951: Mr. I. Magina-tion’s “Sir Gareth, Knight of the Round Table”
3. Christopher A. Snyder, Mississippi State Univ. – Jay Gatsby as the Fair Unknown: Arthurian Resonances in Fitzgerald
4. Tory V. Pearman, Miami Univ. Hamilton – (Dis)abling the Fair Unknown: Disability and Gender in Malory’s “Alexander the Orphan”
5. Ryan Naughton, Arizona State Univ.  – Natural Nobility and Fair Unknowns

 

Saturday 10:30 PM
 436 – BERNHARD 158
Space, Place, and Disability (A Panel Discussion)
Sponsor: Society for the Study of Disability in the Middle Ages
Organizer: Joshua Eyler, Rice Univ.
Presider: Tory V. Pearman, Miami Univ. Hamilton
1. Julie Paulson, San Francisco State Univ. – “Fooles that Goon in Goddis Weys”: Mental Disability and Moral Personhood in Late Medieval Literature
2. Danielle Allor, Rutgers Univ.  – “Mobile as Wishes”: Disability, Intersubjectivity, and Community in the Liber confortatorius
3. Leah Pope, Univ. of Wisconsin–Madison – The Grave’s a Fine and Private Place: Death and the Embodied Anglo-Saxon Subject
4. Aleksandra Pfau, Hendrix College – Disability in the Village: Household Care in Late Medieval France

 

Sunday 8:30 AM
527 – BERNHARD 158
Medievalism and Disability (A Roundtable)
Sponsor: Society for the Study of Disability in the Middle Ages
Organizer: Joshua Eyler, Rice Univ.
Presider :John P. Sexton, Bridgewater State Univ.
1. Jess Genevieve Bailey, Univ. of California–Berkeley – Urs Graf ’s Daughter Courage: Violence and Disability in Late Medieval Europe
2. Christopher Baswell, Barnard College – A Visual Database for Medieval Disability
3. Tirumular Narayanan, California State Univ.–Chico – Impaired in Camelot: An Analysis of Ableism in Hal Foster’s Prince Valiant
4. Kisha G. Tracy, Fitchburg State Univ. – Trope or Truth? Medievalism and the Ubiquity of Disability
5. Elizabeth Wawrzyniak, Marquette Univ.  – Life Was Like That: The Grotesque Medieval in the Modern Imagination

 

Sunday 10:30 AM

556 – SCHNEIDER 1325
Gray Matter: Brains, Diseases, and Disorders
Organizer: Deborah Thorpe, Univ. of York
Presider: Aleksandra Pfau, Hendrix College
1. Wendy J. Turner, Augusta Univ. – Treatment of Learning Disabilities and Other Mental Health Issues in Medieval English Medicine and Law
2. Agnes Karpinski, Univ. des Saarlandes  – Madness, Nightmares, Melancholy: Exceptional Mental States in Medieval Com-
mentaries on Aristotle’s De somno
3. Eliza Buhrer, Loyola Univ. New Orleans – Attention and Distraction in Medieval Thought

 

 

Full program of the Medieval congress here

CFP – « Touching Hoccleve » – The International Hoccleve Society – Kalamazoo 2017

Touching Hoccleve – Kalamazoo 2017

Organized by The International Hoccleve Society

Recent work in such fields as disability studies, book history, affect studies, the history of emotions, and cultural studies has raised provocative questions about the writings of Thomas Hoccleve, the fifteenth-century Privy Seal clerk and friend of Geoffrey Chaucer. Hoccleve’s autobiographical accounts of his struggles with mental illness, social disaffection, and the physical strain of writing have offered modern scholars fruitful sites for re-examining the body, its textual representations, and its affects in ways analogous to current work in these emergent interdisciplinary fields. In particular, Hoccleve’s texts permit critiques of the presupposition of normative, able bodies as well as explorations of the variety of non-rational, sub-discursive ways that bodies affect and are affected by their surroundings. Recent scholarly attention to both the discursive affects and material effects of Thomas Hoccleve’s poetry has offered numerous sites for touching the medieval to these modern interventions.

Our panel seeks papers that extend work along these critical interventions, organizing our thought around the metaphors of “touching” and “recovering.” Thomas Hoccleve’s affective and emotional economies stage the categories of wellness, malady, (dis)ability, precarity, and recovery in quixotic and often thought-provoking ways. The blurring languages of financial, mental, and physical recovery in Hoccleve’s poetics present a complex interaction between the physical and psychic burdens of a precarious life. We hope the panel will consider both the ways Hoccleve’s depictions of malady and recovery can be touching and the sites where modern critical methods can touch Hoccleve’s medieval world in ways similar to those proposed by affect theorists like Erin Manning and medieval literary scholars like Carolyn Dinshaw. We invite papers that touch upon Hocclevean recovery in all of its facets and forms, including his poetic descriptions of recovery and its attendant affects, the recovery of Hocclevean material, the medieval medical contexts of Hoccleve’s infirmities, the work of memory as an act of recovery in the past and the present, the place of the text in all of its materiality as a document of recovery, and the blurring of financial, psychic, and physical recovery. In other words, we ask what is touching about Hoccleve’s poetry – what does it mean to be touched by it, to touch on it, or to handle its material?

We hope to offer a more nuanced and sensitive account of the affects, emotions, bodies, and texts engendered by Hoccleve’s poetics of recovering while also remaining open to the ways that recovery and the poetics of touch can be risky (or risqué). We recognize that touching the past can be dangerous or have the potential to diminish or destroy the very material we seek to handle. Similarly, we are sensitive to the ways in which thinking, writing, and speaking about recovery and non-normative bodies or subject positions can be difficult, uncomfortable, potentially offensive, or otherwise disaffecting. To touch the past can be exposing. Yet, the past’s provocative power resides in its very exposures to us and its power to expose us in its brief brushes and gentle caresses. We take up Hocclevean recovery, then, in order to ask whether, how, and why it touches us and how we might continue to reach back a recovering hand to our Hocclevean texts.

Please submit abstracts and inquiries to The International Hoccleve Society at hocclevesociety@gmail.com by September 15.

 

More information on the International Hoccleve Society website.

CFP – Kalamazoo – Before and After 1348: Prelude and Consequences of the Black Death

Session on Black Death at International Congress on Medieval Studies (Kalamazoo), May 11-14, 2017

“Before and After 1348:  Prelude and Consequences of the Black Death,” organized by Monica Green, email: monica.green@asu.edu.
Abstract:  The “new paradigm” of Black Death studies has adopted the findings of recent paleogenetics and evolutionary understandings of Yersinia pestis‘s late medieval genetic diversification to see the Black Death as a much broader epidemiological phenomenon than previously realized. Although Black Death narratives are usually told from the perspective of western Europe, it is in fact likely that much of Eurasia and North Africa was affected by the newly proliferating organism. And in many of those areas, we know now, plague “focalized,” becoming embedded in the local fauna and thus persisting for years, or even centuries, thereafter. This session invites work that looks both at the late medieval pandemic’s origins before 1348 (whether in China or other places in central Eurasia) and its after-effects, including the 1360-63 pestis secunda. Cultural as well as scientific approaches are welcome.

Please send proposals directly to me: monica.green@asu.edu.  Paper proposals (a one-page abstract and a Participant Information Form) are due by September 15. The links to information on the submission process and the Participation Information Form may be found at http://www.wmich.edu/medievalcongress/submissions. For the statement on Congress rules, see: http://www.wmich.edu/medievalcongress/policies.

You may wish to know that the newly created Contagions: Society for Historic Infectious Disease Studies will also be sponsoring two sessions, tentatively entitled “Historic Landscapes of Disease,” and “The Great Transition: Climate, Disease, and Society in the Late Medieval World: A Roundtable on Bruce Campbell’s New Book.” For info on those sessions, please contact Michelle Ziegler, zieglerm@slu.edu.

 

More information on the American Association for the History of Medicine website

CFP – Sponsored Panel on « Gendered Experiences of Pain » at 52nd – ICMS Kalamazoo 2017

CfP – Sponsored Panel on « Gendered Experiences of Pain » at 52nd International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, 2017

Panel title: “Everybody’s (Gender) Hurts: Gendered Experiences of Pain”

Sponsored by: Society for Medieval Feminist Scholarship

Conference: 52nd International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, (MI, USA), 11-14 May, 2017

 

Following Elaine Scarry’s (1985) seminal work The Body in Pain, researchers from various disciplines have productively studied pain as a physical phenomenon with wide-ranging emotional and socio-cultural effects (e.g. Boddice 2014; Cohen et al 2012; Davies 2014; Morris 1991; Moscoso 2012).  Academics and scientist-clinicians have demonstrated that the experience of pain is highly gendered (see e.g. Bendelow 1993; Bernardes et al 2014; Hoffmann and Tarzian 2001). For example, the severity of women’s pain is often less readily accepted by medics. Women in pain are more likely to be dismissed as attention-seeking or suffering from psycho-somatic conditions than men. Painful conditions that affect many women, such as endometriosis, are woefully under-studied.

Medievalists have also analysed pain, including its’ gendered dimension, elucidating a specifically medieval construction of physical distress (see e.g. Cohen 1995, 2000, 2010; Easton 2002; Mills 2005; Mowbray, 2009). In particular, Caroline Walker Bynum’s ground-breaking feminist scholarship (see e.g. 1988, 1992) has shown the specific ways in which medieval holy women harnessed ascetic suffering as forms of empowering worship praxes.

This panel will examine the gendered experience of pain in the medieval period, engaging with, and moving beyond, the limited context of holy women established by Bynum. It will dissect the ways in which men and women experienced — or were understood to experience — pain differerently, to elucidate the wider framework of gender-specific suffering in the period. The subjective experiences of medieval men and women in pain will be unearthed, allowing their marginalised voices to add context and further urgency to contemporary debates about inadequate medical care for modern men and women in pain.

 

Relevant questions for this session include:

· How are the pains of  “women’s complaints” — including menstruation and childbirth — depicted, and understood in the medieval era? Are other forms of physical discomfort coded as predominantly feminineeven if they have no direct biological link to womanhood? Are there similar “male” forms of pain?

· How are men and women socialised differently to understand, to contextualise, and ultimately to experience their pain? How do men and women express their pain? And share their pain with those around them? Are specific patterns of lexis, imagery, or metaphor routinely used by either men and women, or both?

· What differences can we observe between the ways in which men and women in pain are treated by medical practitioners, the religious community, and their families? What was the contemporary rationale for classifying and treating men and women’s pain differently? As a counterpoint: what similarities are there in the treatment of pain for men and women? Does the pain experience ever unite suffering men and women as a cohesive group, a group in which pain — and not genderis the most important identity marker?
If you’re interested in speaking on this panel, please submit the following documents to the panel organiser, Alicia Spencer-Hall (a.spencer-hall [at] qmul.ac.uk), by 15 September 2017:

1) One-page abstract

2) Completed Participant Information Form (downloadable in .pdf and Word format from the Conference website)
N.B. Conference regulations stipulate that speakers may only present on one panel each year at Kalamazoo. As such, we cannot consider papers from individuals who have already submitted abstract proposals to other sessions at the conference. Nevertheless, if a paper submission is not selected for the “Gendered Experiences of Pain” panel, we will forward the submission to the Conference organisers for potential inclusion in a General Session.

View this CfP online , via @aspencerhall

 

CFP – Le CESCM à Kalamazoo en 2017 – Signs of Identity, Marks of Otherness: New Approaches to Visual Culture

Le CESCM à Kalamazoo en 2017 – L’altérité (sociale, religieuse, politique, linguistique) et ses implications dans le domaine du visuel – 11  au 14 mai 2017

 

Le Centre d’études supérieures de civilisation médiévale et l’International Medieval Society-Paris lancent un appel à communication pour une session de communications organisée dans le cadre de l’International Congress on Medieval Studies qui se déroulera à Kalamazoo (USA) du 11  au 14 mai 2017 et qui réunit tous les ans dans le Michigan plus de 3000 médiévistes venus du monde entier. Cet appel conjoint est l’occasion pour le CESCM d’organiser pour la première fois un événement scientifique lors de l’ICMS,  sur le thème de l’altérité (sociale, religieuse, politique, linguistique) et ses implications dans le domaine du visuel.

Les propositions de communication (CV et résumé) sont à adresser à Vincent Debiais avant le 15 septembre 2016 ; merci aussi de renseigner la fiche d’inscription de l’ICMS. Pour tout renseignement, contacter Vincent Debiais : vincent.debiais@univ-poitiers.fr

Signs of Identity, Marks of Otherness: New Approaches to Visual Culture

This session will explore new avenues of research on visual signs marking the identity of social, religious, and political groups in different spaces (real or imaginary), and the ways in which these groups distinguished themselves.  Recent advances in the auxiliary sciences, which take into account social phenomena in the origin, creation and usage of systems of signs, permit  to revisit questions posed by emblems, armor, inscriptions, and images that mark the landscape and establish hierarchical spaces, both separate and connected.  In the dialectic of inclusion/exclusion, signs become references of identity included, integrated, claimed or rejected in reaction to historical circumstances and power relations.  This session brings together specialists from different disciplines to explore how visual signs work in real spaces, such as cities, monasteries, and castles; and literary spaces where such signs appear frequently in motifs and narratives.

This session welcomes interdisciplinary submissions.  Scholars working on original approaches to signs of identity through social history, visual culture, and the auxiliary sciences are encouraged to submit abstracts.  In this way, the session will have very broad appeal to participants at Kalamazoo.  Possible themes are: disputes, divisions, and heraldic claims; banners, standards, and flags; epigraphic marking and destruction; the role of written culture/visual culture in the strength of social groups.

 

Voir l’appel sur les carnets du CESCM

CFP – ICMS Kalamazoo 2017: “Grey Matter: Brains, Diseases, and Disorders”

Call for papers: ICMS Kalamazoo 2017

“Grey Matter: Brains, Diseases, and Disorders”

Special session organised by Deborah Thorpe, Centre for Chronic Diseases and Disorders at the University of York, UK.

Description:

This session invites papers that examine any aspect of medieval cognition, neurology, and/or psychiatry through medieval source material. This topic can be approached through any one or combination of disciplines, and novel combinations of disciplines are encoraged. Especially welcome are papers that consider the relationships between modern medicine and medieval source material, such as the benefits and/or inherent problems of retrospective diagnosis and the value of the study of medieval history for our medical understanding today.

The session also encourages papers that explore terminology for diseases and disorders both modern and premodern, the diagnosis of conditions involving the brain, and the impact of neurological/psychiatric diseases and disorders on medieval lives.

Send abstracts of no more than 250 words, or any questions about this session, to Deborah.thorpe@york.ac.uk

 

See the CFP on Deborah’s Thorpe blog « The scribe Unbound ».