Archives par mot-clé : Interdisciplinarity

CFP – The Old and the Young: Medieval Bodies Ignored – ICMS Kalamazoo 2018

The Old and the Young:
Medieval Bodies Ignored

Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Sponsored Sessions at Kalamazoo, May 1043 2018

These sessions will concentrate upon the experiences and bodies of the old and the young, Recognising that the medieval normative body (male,
middle aged and white) has influenced the way we look at the MA, the intention of these sessions is to highlight the experiences of children and the elderly which are outside the boundaries of said norm. Furthermore, we wish to gain a greater understanding of how other factors (gender, race, ability, wealth, bodily status, power) intersect with and impact upon the experiences of elderly and young people. While medieval childhood studies is by no means a neglected field, historiography has recently turned away from a ‘panhistorical and essentialist’ child-centric model. This allows us to examine the experiences of a child within culturally specific contexts in which it might be neglected, abandoned or dismissed. Meanwhile, the old are often marginalised in scholarship, within the medieval discourse and in our lived reality. The hope is that by examining their experiences in concert with one another, we will be able to build up a clearer understanding of the lived experience of the old and the young in the Middle Ages.

Intersectional, interdisciplinary abstracts would be particularly welcomed.
Possible Topics Include:
‘ Specific historical experiences of being young and old
‘ Body as physical entity and as a site of rhetoric
‘ Dual nature of body: site of discourse and identity
‘ Descriptions of old and young bodies

Please submit a 250-word proposal for a 15- to 20-minute paper as well as a Participant Information Form to medievalbodiesignored@gmail.com by September 15, 2017.

 

CFP – IMC Leeds – Medieval Bodies Ignored

Medieval Bodies Ignored
CfP IMC 2018: Deadline 31St August 2017

Since Caroline Walker Bynum’s 1995 article ‘Why All the Fuss
About the Body?’, the discussion around bodies as historical
bodies has flourished. In these sessions, the intent is to pick out,
from ‘the cacophony of discourses’ that medieval people used to
discuss the body, a few of the notes that are sometimes
overlooked. Discussion post—Caroline Walker Bynum has often
focused on the human body, but her work has also opened up a
wider examination of the ways in which non —human bodies were
conceptualised. Non-human animals, environmental bodies and
socio-political bodies are all discussed in relation to humans and
the non-human body. Equally, humans could also be discussed in
relation to non-human bodies, either in a positive or a derogatory
sense. These sessions will explore how human and non-human
bodies have influenced each other during the Middle Ages and in
scholarship. By examining these seemingly separate discourses in
concert with one another the impact of ideas around
embodiment upon the study of the Middle Ages is revealed and parallels and connections can be exploited.

Themes

‘ Discourses around human and non-human animal bodies:
scientific, literary, juridico—legal.

‘ Concepts of environmental bodies: bodies of water,
geological and geographical bodies, human / non—human
geography.

‘ Political and social bodies: the body politic, the politicised
body, guilds and professional bodies, military bodies.

 

The deadline for 200 – 300 word abstracts is 31st August 2017. Please email: medievalbodiesignored@gmail.com. And follow them on Twitter: @BodiesIgnored

 

CFP – Interiority and Alterity- Hortulus Journal – Fall 2017

Call for Papers: Fall 2017 Themed Issue, “Interiority and Alterity”

Hortulus: The Online Graduate Journal of Medieval Studies is a refereed, peer-reviewed, and born-digital journal devoted to the culture, literature, history, and society of the medieval past. Published semi-annually, the journal collects exceptional examples of work by graduate students on a number of themes, disciplines, subjects, and periods of medieval studies. We also welcome book reviews of monographs published or re-released in the past five years that are of interest to medievalists. For the Fall issue we are particularly interested in reviews of books which fall under the current special topic.

Interiority refers to personal emotions, ideals, and beliefs in addition to self-reflection and inner consciousness. Recent scholarship in Cultural Studies asks how these elements of interiority may impact upon culture more broadly, and the extent to which culture impacts interiority. With alterity we refer not only to the state of being ‘other’ or different, but also to the study of how this difference is created. Within the framework of such study a mutual interrogation between center and periphery remains critical in order to prevent a reproduction of cycles of hegemony. In this context, the concepts of interiority and alterity both complement and contrast with each other: to echo Iain Chambers (himself echoing Heidegger), we refer to what unfolds towards us and away from us, to what both envelopes and exceeds us (“Signs of Silence, Lines of Listening”, The Postcolonial Question: Common Skies, Divided Horizons ed. I. Chambers and L. Curti, pp. 47-63 at p. 54).

For our Fall 2017 themed issue we invite proposals that critically engage with the concepts of interiority and alterity, both as separate concepts and in relation to each other. We hope to attract articles offering comparative and multidisciplinary perspectives, and welcome contributions from the fields of history, art history, literary scholarship, archeology, anthropology, or any other discipline that will contribute to our thinking about the application of these concepts and their broader theoretical contexts in the medieval period. We are particularly interested in submissions that take a more methodology-focused approach and those which engage with the materiality of interiority and alterity in the Middle Ages. Hortulus additionally suggests that contributors familiarize themselves with the current scholarship surrounding the use of the terms ‘Otherness’ and alterity.

Contributions should be in English and roughly 6,000–12,000 words, including all documentation and citational apparatus; book reviews are typically between 500-1,000 words but cannot exceed 2,000. All notes must be endnotes, and a bibliography must be included; submission guidelines can be found here. Contributions may be submitted to hortulus[at]hortulus-journal[dot]com and are due 25 September 2017. If you are interested in submitting a paper but feel you would need additional time, please send a query email and details about an expected time-scale for your submission. Queries about submissions or the journal more generally can also be sent to this address.

More on the Hortulus Journal website

CFP – ‘THE ALL-SEEING EYE’: Vision and Eyesight Across Time and Cultures Workshop, 2018

‘THE ALL-SEEING EYE’: Vision and Eyesight Across Time and Cultures Workshop, 2018

The workshop will take place at Swansea University on Wednesday 11 April 2018. It is hosted by the Research Group for Health, History and Culture, and the Effaced from History? research network on facial appearance.

 

A call for papers has been issued for this workshop which will explore medical, social, and cultural meanings of the eye and vision in contemporary and historical perspective. Vision has often provoked fascination within societies and cultures as the most revered sense. In Western Europe, the eye has been viewed scientifically as the most ‘exquisite’ organ, or spiritually as a ‘window to the soul’. These positions have had an influence on how the eye has been perceived, both as a vital organ and, by implication, one that needed to be protected. Whilst the eye could bring delight to its holder, and be symbolic in a variety of ways, it could also, when lost, incur significant impairment. The workshop will explore this vision impairment and correction, and the extent to which sight loss has been stigmatised. It will welcome papers that explore eyesight and its meanings across time and place, to encourage trans-historical and interdisciplinary discussion. Possible subjects include but are not restricted to:

  • Concepts of the eye within scientific, medical, theological or cultural texts and images
  • Vision in relation to the other senses
  • Testing vision
  • Experiences of sight loss, total and partial
  • Restoring and regaining vision
  • Eye loss: stigma and disfigurement
  • Eye contact, staring and social interaction
  • Adornments to the eye: cosmetics, masks, vision aids and prosthetics
  • Visual and literary representations of the eye
  • Challenges to ableist narratives relating to sight loss and visual impairment.

‌The workshop will take place at Swansea University on Wednesday 11 April 2018. It is hosted by the Research Group for Health, History and Culture, and the Effaced from History? research network on facial appearance.

We invite proposals for twenty-minute papers. Proposals of no more than 200 words, together with the name and institutional affiliation of the speaker should be sent to Gemma Almond at gemma.almond@sciencemuseum.ac.uk or 655580@swansea.ac.uk. The closing date for submissions is 1st December 2017.

RIAH branding - long

The workshop is convened by Professor David Turner, Swansea University and PhD candidate Gemma Almond, Swansea University and the Science Museum, London.

More info on the effaces history project.

 

New publication – Premodern Dis/ability history. A Companion – Didymos pub.

Cordula Nolte, Bianca Frohne, Uta Halle, Sonja Kerth (Eds): A Handbook of Pre-Modern Dis/ability History (Didymos)

 

 

Pre-order here

 

« Covering the period from 500 to 1800, this volume serves as a comprehensive guide into the growing field of dis/ability history. Its contributions by 80 international scholars present groundbreaking research in various historical disciplines, often unearthing hitherto unknown material and highlighting premodern societies from unfamiliar perspectives. The wide range of approaches and subjects comprises theoretical and methodological frameworks, general questions of gender, life-cycle and social status, daily life experiences,work and sustenance, legal norms and practices, strategies of coping and of self-help, medical therapies, organisation of care, emotions and religious interpretations. Compact information, vivid case studies and rich visual material grant an enjoyable and instructive reading for audiences who wish to explore premodern culture on innovative paths. »

 

Since the turn of the century, dis/ability history has been established as a promising, international field of research that enables us to look at historical cultures and societies from a completely new point of view, based on the analytical category of dis/ability. The number of relevant projects and publications is growing, methods and topics are in constant development. At the same time, various intersections with different current approaches within historical scholarship and cultural studies emerge. The combination of these aspects turns the attention of the academia and the wider public to this new research perspective.
However, there is hardly any information available about the self-conception of dis/ability history, about its theories, methods and sources, and about its specific aims, subjects and leading questions. Whereas international dis/ability studies, which laid the groundwork for dis/ability history, have already put forth several handbooks, introductions and readers, dis/ability history is still in need of reference works wherein its basics are presented in a concise, readable, and systematic fashion.
This deficit is especially noticeable with regard to pre-modern dis/ability history, which is even more recent than modern dis/ability history, and where particular challenges have to be met, mainly due to the specifics of medieval and early modern sources. As there has been considerable output within a growing number of essays and edited volumes, but not often in form of monographs yet, it is quite difficult to keep track of research activities and to gain advanced insight into central fields of research.

This is where our handbook comes in. It addresses a diverse audience, including students and renowned scholars as well as interest groups, activists within the fields of politics, culture, education and social work who advocate empowerment and work towards social inclusion, as well as the general public with an interest in history.
The handbook aims to present the current state of research with regard to various disciplines, combining concise information with an accessible presentation based on primary sources and an arrangement of topics that captivates the reader’s interest.

The handbook

  • values interdisciplinarity: topics will be addressed by various disciplines, especially history, literary studies and linguistics, archaeology, anthropology, art history, sociology, religious studies, and theology.
  • brings together international authors (about 80 contributors).
  • is based on primary sources throughout.
  • explicitly addresses controversies regarding different research tendencies and methodologies.
  • combines diachronic and synchronic perspectives, applying a perspective of longue durée whenever possible.
  • entails articles in English and German (the latter being accompanied by English summaries).

 

Didymos-Verlag

Lange Straße 11 · D-71563 Affalterbach

Postfach 11 08 · D-71561 Affalterbach

Tel +49 71 44 › 26 11 791 · Fax +49 71 44 › 26 11 792

für Bestellungen / for orders

info@didymos-verlag.de · www.didymos-verlag.de

More infos on the Homo debilis Creative Unite website

CFP « Re-imagining the Christian Body » Univ. Turku (Finland) 2-3 Nov. ’17.

Re-imagining the Christian Body
Interdisciplinary Conference University of Turku 2-3 November 2017

 
This conference concentrates on the ways in which the human body has been imagined and re-imagined in different Christian cultures at different times from Late Antiquity to present day. In Christianity the human body is often perceived as a privileged site not only for the God-Man relationship but also for the formation of and relationships within and between, communities of believers. These perceptions emerge from and generate different imaginaries of the body. Imagination can be understood as a human faculty that in many ways plays a central part in people’s religious lives and experiences. The notion does not imply something that is false or untrue but rather denotes the ways people go about constituting and perceiving their lived world and their immanent and transcendent environments and relationships. Therefore, Christian imaginaries of the body are not static but depend on the Christian culture in question and are subject to negotiation and change. They also are often central to religious schisms and conflicts but shared imaginaries of the body also have the capacity to unite.

This conference focuses especially upon changes and alterations: how and why does the Christian body become re-imagined in different Christian cultures? What is the role of such imaginations of the body in religious practice, art, museums, and science, for example? What are the methods and technologies for imagining the body in these contexts? What ethical and other consequences do different imaginations of the body and alterations in them have for Christians and for society at large?

 

Keynote speakers in the conference are:

Bonnie Effros, Department of History, University of Florida http://history.ufl.edu/directory/current-faculty/bonnie-effros/

Annelin Eriksen, Department of Social Anthropology, University of Bergen http://www.uib.noien/persons/Annelin.Eriksen
We encourage submissions from different disciplines and from a variety of perspectives. Potential topics include, but are not restricted, to the following:

  • Historical imaginations of the body
  • Saints and relics
  • Body and identity
  • Gender, sexuality and imagination
  • Illness and health
  • Power and authority in limiting or expanding the imagination of bodies
  • Body in religious art
  • Christian utopias and dystopias and the body
  • Limits of imagining the body
  • Methods, practices and technologies for imagining the body
  • Epistemology and imagination of the body
  • Imagination as researcher’s tool

Proposals for individual papers should be sent to cscc@utu.fi by 20 June 2017. Please include in the submission a paper abstract of no more than 250 words and your name, affiliation and e-mail address.

Notifications of abstract acceptance will be sent by June 30.

The conference fee is 50 euros (reduced fee available for graduate students). This covers the programme, coffees and banquet on Thursday evening.

Conference homepage can be found at: reimagining.utu.fi.

The conference is organised by the Turku Institute for Advanced Studies (TIAS), the Centre for the Study of Christian Cultures (CSCC) and the Turku Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies (TUCEM EMS).

Call for contribution – Same Bodies, Different Women: Witches, Whores, and Handicapped – Trivent Publishing

Call for contribution – Same Bodies, Different Women: Witches, Whores, and Handicapped – Trivent Publishing

Serie : HISTORY AND ARCHEOLOGY

‘Other’ Women in the Middle Ages and the Early Modern Period
Who are the ‘other’ women of the Middle Ages and the Early Modern Period?
This volume seeks to offer a overview on female otherness concentrating on the variety of contexts in which ‘other’ women emerge:
How is their ‘otherness’ constructed?
Who are the forgotten women of the Middle Ages?
How are they perceived?
What makes them ‘other?

 

The literature on women in the Middle Ages or the Early Modern Period has the tendency to mostly emphasize models (be that
saints, queens, or women in positions of power)
and the brighter side of femininity.
This scholarship is occasionally supplemented by individual case studies of ‘other’ women, such as prostitutes, which are usually used to reinforce notions of ‘ideal’ feminine behaviour.
Nevertheless, a volume which encompasses all forms of deviance from the norm seems necessary to counterbalance and to supplement this vast literature on medieval women.
Applying a multi-disciplinary approach to these marginalized women should aid not only in uncovering a more complete picture of medieval women, but also to better understand their own agency and potential for action.

 

This volume welcomes individually – submitted papers, but will also gather the papers from the workshop entitled
“Forgotten Women from a Forgotten Region: Prostitutes and Female Slaves in Central and Eastern Europe in the Long Middle Ages” to be held at Central European University, Budapest, in May, 2017

 

They welcome papers for the volume to be titled Same Bodies, Different Women: Witches, Whores, and Handicapped. ‘Other’ Women in the Middle Ages and the Early Modern Period Aiming to reflect recent research on the construction(s) of female otherness, we call for original manuscripts focusing on (but not limited to) the following transdisciplinary topics related to women :
  • Art: visual and textual sources (the whore of Babylon/the Apocalypse, courtesans, etc)
  • Religion: impure, lapsed, possessed women, heretics
  • Medicine: disabled, mentally insane or ill women , hermaphrodites ; abortions/bodily dysfunctions/malformations
  • Society: witches, beggars, foreigners, enslaved women
  • Sexuality: prostitutes, sexually deviant women

 

Submission Guidelines
Papers should be written following the humanities template and guidelines found at www.trivent-publishing.eu and should have between minimum 7 and maximum 20 pages
We expect submissions by no later than September 2017.

 

The volume will be published open access. It will be listed in
CEEOL, Directory of Open Access Scholarly Resources, SSOAR, DOI, and will be sent for evaluation in the Book Citation Index of Thomson Reuters.

 

For information and queries on the scientific content of the volume, please contact the editors of the volume,
Andrea-Bianka Znorovszky,
American University of Central Asia,
znorovszky_a@auca.kg
Christopher Mielke, Central European University,
Mielke_Christopher@phd.ceu.edu
For information on the publication, please contact teodora.artimon@trivent-publishing.eu
or see Trivent Publishing’s website here:
www.trivent -publishing.eu

 

FInd the call for contribution on the editor’s website.

 

 

Sessions on Disability History – The 52nd International Congress on Medieval Studies – campus of Western Michigan University – May 11-14, 2017.

Sessions on Disability History – The 52nd International Congress on Medieval Studies – campus of Western Michigan University – May 11-14, 2017.

 

Friday, May 12 – Evening Events
Society for the Study of Disability in the Middle Ages
=> Valley II, LeFevre Lounge Business Meeting

 

Friday 10 AM

214 – BERNHARD 210

Landscape Approaches to the Plague

Sponsor: Contagions: Society for Historic Infectious Disease Studies
Organizer: Michelle Ziegler, Independent Scholar
Presider: Philip Slavin, Univ. of Kent
1. Michelle Ziegler – Plague in the Sixth-Century Bavarian Landscape
2. Carenza Lewis, Univ. of Lincoln – 44.7%: New archaeological Evidence for the Impact of the Black Death in
England and Its Implications for Future Research
3. Fabian Crespo, Univ. of Louisville – Heterogeneous Immunological Landscapes and Medieval Plague

 

Saturday 10 AM
345 – VALLEY III ELDRIDGE 309
Piers Plowman and Disability
Sponsor: International Piers Plowman Society
Organizer: Curtis Gruenler, Hope College
Presider: Curtis Gruenler
1. Dana Roders, Purdue Univ. – Intersections of Disability and Sin in Piers Plowman
2. Laura Godfrey, Univ. of Connecticut – Must I Here-Wel to Do-Wel? Sensory Impairments in Piers Plowman
3. Richard H. Godden, Loyola Univ. New Orleans – Dismodern Will

 

Saturday 10 AM
393 – BERNHARD BROWN & GOLD ROOM
Fair Unknowns (A Roundtable)
Sponsor: Arthuriana
Organizer: Dorsey Armstrong, Purdue Univ./Arthuriana
Presider: Dorsey Armstrong,
1. Joseph M. Sullivan, Univ. of Oklahoma – What’s So Interesting About Fair Unknown Romances in Germanic Arthurian Literatures?
2. Kevin J. Harty, La Salle Univ. – Rescued from the Archives: The Fair Unknown on CBS TV in 1951: Mr. I. Magina-tion’s “Sir Gareth, Knight of the Round Table”
3. Christopher A. Snyder, Mississippi State Univ. – Jay Gatsby as the Fair Unknown: Arthurian Resonances in Fitzgerald
4. Tory V. Pearman, Miami Univ. Hamilton – (Dis)abling the Fair Unknown: Disability and Gender in Malory’s “Alexander the Orphan”
5. Ryan Naughton, Arizona State Univ.  – Natural Nobility and Fair Unknowns

 

Saturday 10:30 PM
 436 – BERNHARD 158
Space, Place, and Disability (A Panel Discussion)
Sponsor: Society for the Study of Disability in the Middle Ages
Organizer: Joshua Eyler, Rice Univ.
Presider: Tory V. Pearman, Miami Univ. Hamilton
1. Julie Paulson, San Francisco State Univ. – “Fooles that Goon in Goddis Weys”: Mental Disability and Moral Personhood in Late Medieval Literature
2. Danielle Allor, Rutgers Univ.  – “Mobile as Wishes”: Disability, Intersubjectivity, and Community in the Liber confortatorius
3. Leah Pope, Univ. of Wisconsin–Madison – The Grave’s a Fine and Private Place: Death and the Embodied Anglo-Saxon Subject
4. Aleksandra Pfau, Hendrix College – Disability in the Village: Household Care in Late Medieval France

 

Sunday 8:30 AM
527 – BERNHARD 158
Medievalism and Disability (A Roundtable)
Sponsor: Society for the Study of Disability in the Middle Ages
Organizer: Joshua Eyler, Rice Univ.
Presider :John P. Sexton, Bridgewater State Univ.
1. Jess Genevieve Bailey, Univ. of California–Berkeley – Urs Graf ’s Daughter Courage: Violence and Disability in Late Medieval Europe
2. Christopher Baswell, Barnard College – A Visual Database for Medieval Disability
3. Tirumular Narayanan, California State Univ.–Chico – Impaired in Camelot: An Analysis of Ableism in Hal Foster’s Prince Valiant
4. Kisha G. Tracy, Fitchburg State Univ. – Trope or Truth? Medievalism and the Ubiquity of Disability
5. Elizabeth Wawrzyniak, Marquette Univ.  – Life Was Like That: The Grotesque Medieval in the Modern Imagination

 

Sunday 10:30 AM

556 – SCHNEIDER 1325
Gray Matter: Brains, Diseases, and Disorders
Organizer: Deborah Thorpe, Univ. of York
Presider: Aleksandra Pfau, Hendrix College
1. Wendy J. Turner, Augusta Univ. – Treatment of Learning Disabilities and Other Mental Health Issues in Medieval English Medicine and Law
2. Agnes Karpinski, Univ. des Saarlandes  – Madness, Nightmares, Melancholy: Exceptional Mental States in Medieval Com-
mentaries on Aristotle’s De somno
3. Eliza Buhrer, Loyola Univ. New Orleans – Attention and Distraction in Medieval Thought

 

 

Full program of the Medieval congress here

 

Le laboratoire ICT (Identités, Cultures, Territoires, Université Paris 7 – Paris Diderot) et le Groupe de Recherche sur l’Eugénisme et le Racisme (UFR EILA, Université Paris 7 – Paris Diderot) sont heureux de vous inviter à une discussion sur Anthropologie et Histoire du Handicap autour de la présentation des derniers ouvrages de Henri-Jacques Stiker (chercheur associé au laboratoire ICT, Université Paris 7 – Paris Diderot).

Cette rencontre, suivie d’un verre de l’amitié, se tiendra le mercredi 22 mars 2017 de 17h à 19h à l’université Paris 7 – Paris Diderot, bâtiment Sophie Germain, amphithéâtre Turing (8 Place Aurélie Nemours, 75013 Paris, plan en pièce jointe, accessible aux Personnes à mobilité réduite).

Pour toutes demandes complémentaires merci de contacter ninon.dubourg@gmail.com.

En espérant vous accueillir nombreux à cette présentation d’ouvrages,

Nos cordiales salutations.

CFP – ALTER – Handicap, Recognition and “Living Together”. Diversity of practices and plurality of values – University of Lausanne

6th annual conference ALTER

Handicap, Recognition and “Living Together”. Diversity of practices and plurality of values

University of Lausanne

 

La Société européenne de recherche sur le handicap – ALTER a retenu la Suisse pour l’organisation de sa 6ème conférence annuelle, qui se déroulera les 6 et 7 juillet 2017 à l’Université de Lausanne. Cette conférence, qui réunit chaque année une centaine de chercheurs et chercheuses venant d’Europe et d’autres continents, aura pour thème en 2017: «Handicap, Reconnaissance et “Vivre ensemble”. Diversité des pratiques et pluralité des valeurs».
L’appel à communications (délai de soumission: 22 janvier 2017), des informations complémentaires et les indications pour vous inscrire se trouvent sous le lien: http://alterconf2017.sciencesconf.org/

The European Society for Disability Research – ALTER chose Switzerland to host its 6th annual conference, to be held on 6 and 7 July 2017 at the University of Lausanne. This conference, which annually brings together more than one hundred researchers from Europe and from other continents, in 2017 will have the following theme: «Handicap, Recognition and “Living Together”. Diversity of practices and plurality of values».

For the call for papers (deadline: 22 January 2017), additional information and instructions to register, please see the link below:
http://alterconf2017.sciencesconf.org/

History of Disease, Disability & Medicine in Medieval Europe