Archives par mot-clé : IMC Leeds

Colloquium – Must see panels at IMCL – 3-6 July 2017 – ‘Otherness’

Colloquium – Must see panels at IMCL – 3-6 July 2017 – on ‘Otherness’

Please, feel free to contact us if you are giving a speech on something close to disability history that we miss.

Session 1018
Title Exceptionally Healthy?: Exploring Disease, Disfigurement, and Disability as the Norm in Medieval Culture
Date/Time Wednesday 5 July 2017: 09.00-10.30
Sponsor Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Research (MEMO), Swansea University / Wellcome ‘Effaced’ Project, Swansea University
Organiser Patricia E. Skinner, Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Research (MEMO), Swansea University
Moderator/Chair Elma Brenner, Wellcome Library, London
Paper 1018-a Epilepsy and Otherness: The Prophet and His Detractors
(Language: English)
Hillary Burgardt, Department of Classics, Ancient History & Egyptology, Swansea University
Index Terms: Medicine; Rhetoric; Sermons and Preaching; Social History
Paper 1018-b ‘Normality’ and the ‘Other’ at the End of the World: Sickness and Disability in the Passio Olavi
(Language: English)
Karl Christian Alvestad, Department of History, University of Winchester
Index Terms: Medicine; Religious Life; Social History
Paper 1018-c Looking Strange: A Positive Asset?
(Language: English)
Patricia E. Skinner, Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Research (MEMO), Swansea University
Index Terms: Medicine; Religious Life; Social History
Abstract Engaging with the problematic category ‘others’, this sessions takes as its starting point the sheer ubiquity of sick, disfigured and disabled persons in medieval narrative and legal texts, and ask whether it is tenable to propose good health as a ‘normal’ human state between 500 and 1500CE. The panellists take a queer view that challenges the paradigmatic position of those who were sick, disfigured or incapacitated as excluded or ‘on the margins’, and instead illustrates the necessity of inclusion of these groups in discourses of power and piety.
Session 1110
Title ‘For I am a woman, ignorant, weak, and frail’: Feminising Death and Disease in the Later Middle Ages
Date/Time Wednesday 5 July 2017: 11.15-12.45
Organiser Victoria Baker, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Rachael Gillibrand, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Moderator/Chair Rachael Gillibrand, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Paper 1110-a Death and the Maiden: Exploring the Feminisation of Death
(Language: English)
Victoria Baker, Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds
Index Terms: Daily Life; Gender Studies
Abstract Within late medieval society, to be valued was to look and behave according to the societal ‘norm’ – dependency was largely represented as a feminine trait, whereas to be independent was to be masculine. How then did medieval people respond to deviations from these gendered expectations as a result of death (or dying) and chronic diseases? This session will consider the feminisation of death and disease through an interdisciplinary lens, in order to answer questions about the perceived ‘feminine’ dependency of the marginal ‘third state’ between being fully healthy and fully sick (i.e. to be dying or diseased). It will consider the contradictory nature of disease and the female response to death and disease as elements of daily life which were (largely) out of their control; the effect of death, disability, and disease on medieval constructions of masculinity; and whether – if death and disease dehumanise the body – is it even important to consider the effect of these states on an individual’s gendered identity?
Session 1118
Title Social Exclusion: Leprosy, Madness, and Wardrobe Malfunctions
Date/Time Wednesday 5 July 2017: 11.15-12.45
Organiser IMC Programming Committee
Moderator/Chair Patricia E. Skinner, Centre for Medieval & Early Modern Research (MEMO), Swansea University
Paper 1118-a The Transitory Convention of Madness in Arthurian Literature
(Language: English)
Erwann Hollevoet, Faculteit Letteren, KU Leuven / Group for Early Modern Studies, Universiteit Gent
Index Terms: Language and Literature – Middle English; Medicine; Philosophy; Social History
Paper 1118-b Clothing as a Means of Exclusion in Wolfram’s Parzival
(Language: English)
Alissa Theiss, Institut für Deutsche Philologie des Mittelalters, Philipps-Universität Marburg
Index Terms: Daily Life; Gender Studies; Language and Literature – German; Mentalities
Paper 1118-c ‘…with fleschelie lust sa maculait…’: Leprosy as Otherness in R. Henryson’s Testament of Cresseid
(Language: English)
Maria Luisa Maggioni, Dipartimento di Scienze linguistiche e letterature straniere, Università Cattolica del Sacro Cuore, Milano
Index Terms: Language and Literature – Middle English; Religious Life
Abstract Paper -a:
When Jacques Derrida in Cogito and the History of Madness denounced Michel Foucault’s project of providing the madman with a voice as the ‘greatest merit but also the very infeasibility of his book’ on the basis of its reliance on the reason-dominated language of philosophical tradition, he could have irrevocably silenced those madmen that have been exclusionary prohibited from participating within our constitutively reasonable society. However, there are other types of language that escape the constitutive dominance of reason and periods of history that preclude the exclusion of madness by reason and thus allow the true voice of madness to be heard. The voice of madness is not merely awakened in Arthurian literature; it also reveals the performative construction of medieval identificatory categories, as madness functions as a transitory literary convention within the construction of Arthurian knightly identity.

Paper -b:
In Wolfram of Eschenbach’s Parzival the young and naive Parzival sets forth for fame and fortune wearing a fool’s dress made by his mother. His clothing mirrors his manners. Due to Parzival’s foolish behaviour Lady Jeschute is being punished and humiliated without cause by her husband. She is no longer allowed to change her clothes. Parzival’s dress and Jeschute’s torn clothing are tantamount to a divestiture. The actions of Parzival, dressed up like a villain, lead to Jeschute becoming an outlaw herself. Lacking appropriate clothing she cannot take part in courtly society any longer. When eventually Parzival is able to prove her innocence, Jeschute’s re-entry into society is marked by being cloaked with her husband’s surcoat.

Paper -c:
‘Mass illnesses – from syphilis to cholera, from the Black Death to leprosy – have been linked to otherness both historically and cross-culturally’ (Yardley, 2013). In R. Henryson’s poem The Testament of Cresseid (mid-15th century) the protagonist’s punishment for her blasphemy is leprosy. This makes her a symbol for sexually transmitted diseases (in accordance with medieval belief) and for the persecuted and marginalized victim. The dramatic physical changes Cressida undergoes, which mark the beginning of her conversion, also cause her estrangement from her previous life. In order to highlight the connotative value of the vocabulary chosen by the Henryson, this study focuses on the linguistic means chosen by the Scottish poet to describe Cressida’s downfall and her becoming ‘other’ both physically and psychologically.

 

Session 1218
Title Leprosy and Power in the High Middle Ages
Date/Time Wednesday 5 July 2017: 14.15-15.45
Sponsor Graduate Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Reading
Organiser Katie Phillips, Graduate Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Reading
Moderator/Chair Elma Brenner, Wellcome Library, London
Paper 1218-a From Heinrich to Tristan: The Changing Function of Lepers in Middle High German Literature
(Language: English)
Madelon Köhler-Busch, Department of Humanities, University of Wisconsin-Platteville
Index Terms: Canon Law; Language and Literature – German; Pagan Religions; Social History
Paper 1218-b ‘The Conspicuous Patron of Lepers’?: Lepers and the King in the 12th and Early 13th Centuries
(Language: English)
Paul Webster, School of History, Archaeology & Religion, Cardiff University
Index Terms: Medicine; Politics and Diplomacy; Religious Life
Paper 1218-c Locus (in)honestus: Early Franciscan Attitudes towards the Leper Hospital
(Language: English)
Edward Sutcliffe, Department of Religion & Theology, University of Bristol
Index Terms: Ecclesiastical History; Hagiography; Religious Life
Abstract The papers in this session will explore the relationship between lepers and authority, focussing particularly on England and France in the central Middle Ages. The complex and ambiguous perceptions of the disease resulted in similarly complicated responses, both towards individuals diagnosed with leprosy, and towards groups of lepers living in dedicated leper houses. The session will explore the way in which lepers may have used their diagnosis to their advantage, and perhaps exploited their ‘Otherness’. In addition, the responses of kings and legal bodies are examined as a means of understanding contemporary reactions to leprosy.
Session 1240
Title Health and Medicine in the Early Medieval West, I: Situating Medical Texts and Practices
Date/Time Wednesday 5 July 2017: 14.15-15.45
Organiser Claire Burridge, Faculty of History, University of Cambridge
Zubin Mistry, School of History, Classics & Archaeology, University of Edinburgh
Moderator/Chair Claire Burridge, Faculty of History, University of Cambridge
Paper 1240-a The Female Patient, the Physician, and Medical Responsibility in Late Antiquity
(Language: English)
Caroline Musgrove, Faculty of Classics, University of Cambridge
Index Terms: Daily Life; Gender Studies; Medicine; Women’s Studies
Paper 1240-b Teraupetica (sic) : Manuscript Context and Christian Ideology in an Early Medieval Book of Medical Recipes
(Language: English)
Arsenio Ferraces-Rodríguez, Departamento de Letras, Universidade da Coruña
Index Terms: Manuscripts and Palaeography; Medicine; Theology
Paper 1240-c ‘Mirubalanus est genus coriote nascitur in egypto’: Mapping Pharmaceutical Provenance in Early Medieval Recipe Collections
(Language: English)
Jeffrey Doolittle, Department of History, Fordham University
Index Terms: Daily Life; Medicine
Abstract Despite important new work, early medieval medicine still remains quarantined from the mainstream of early medieval historiography. The aim of these sessions is to diagnose and treat this historiographical ‘otherness’ by using health and medicine as ways of exploring early medieval societies. This first session focuses on situating medical texts, traditions and practices. Papers will use medical texts to explore a range of questions including the relationship between practical medicine and Christian ideology, gender and medical practice, the nature of learning, and connections across space and time.
Session 1319
Title Body, Soul, and Otherness, II: Religious and Medical Definitions of Mental and Physical Difference
Date/Time Wednesday 5 July 2017: 16.30-18.00
Sponsor ‘The Body in the City’ Consortium & Trivium, Tampere Centre for Classical, Medieval & Early Modern Studies, University of Tampere
Organiser Jenni Kuuliala, School of Social Sciences & Humanities, University of Tampere
Moderator/Chair Gordon Whyte, School of Philosophical, Historical & International Studies, Monash University, Victoria
Paper 1319-a Demonic Possession and the Physical, Spiritual, and Social ‘Other’
(Language: English)
Sari Katajala-Peltomaa, School of Social Sciences & Humanities, University of Tampere
Index Terms: Hagiography; Lay Piety; Medicine; Mentalities
Paper 1319-b Effacing Demons: Ritual and Medical Care in Medieval Drama
(Language: English)
Andreea-Dana Marculescu, Department of Women’s & Gender Studies, University of Oklahoma
Index Terms: Language and Literature – French or Occitan; Lay Piety; Medicine; Mentalities
Paper 1319-c Sainthood, Physical Deviance, and Otherness in the Late Middle Ages
(Language: English)
Jenni Kuuliala, School of Social Sciences & Humanities, University of Tampere
Index Terms: Hagiography; Lay Piety; Medicine; Social History
Abstract Religion and medicine were in many ways intertwined in the Middle Ages, both in explaining deviance, illness, and impairment as well as in the healing practices. Religion and medicine also offered methods, which sometimes overlapped and sometimes contradicted each other, for cure and for ways to integrate deviant people back into a community. This session analyses healing as a cultural practice; the focal questions are how religious and medical explanations intermingled in the construction of ‘the Other’, and in what ways they complemented or competed in explaining, categorising, and treating different mental and bodily conditions.
Session 1340
Title Health and Medicine in the Early Medieval West, II: Beyond Medical Texts
Date/Time Wednesday 5 July 2017: 16.30-18.00
Organiser Claire Burridge, Faculty of History, University of Cambridge
Zubin Mistry, School of History, Classics & Archaeology, University of Edinburgh
Moderator/Chair Richard Sowerby, School of History, Classics & Archaeology, University of Edinburgh
Paper 1340-a Incorporating Palaeopathological Evidence in the Study of Early Medieval Health and Medicine
(Language: English)
Claire Burridge, Faculty of History, University of Cambridge
Index Terms: Archaeology – General; Daily Life; Medicine; Technology
Paper 1340-b Soul-Searching: Some Carolingian Answers
(Language: English)
Meg Leja, History Department, Binghamton University
Index Terms: Learning (The Classical Inheritance); Medicine; Theology
Paper 1340-c ‘There are three reasons why sterilitas affects women’: Thinking about Fertility in Carolingian Monasteries
(Language: English)
Zubin Mistry, School of History, Classics & Archaeology, University of Edinburgh
Index Terms: Biblical Studies; Gender Studies; Learning (The Classical Inheritance); Medicine
Abstract Despite important new work, early medieval medicine still remains quarantined from the mainstream of early medieval historiography. The aim of these sessions is to diagnose and treat this historiographical ‘otherness’ by using health and medicine as ways of exploring early medieval societies. This second session uses medical and non-medical texts to explore ideas about body and soul as well as non-textual approaches to investigate the health of early medieval populations.
Session 1508
Title Crusading, Identity, and Otherness, I: Women, Children, and the Old
Date/Time Thursday 6 July 2017: 09.00-10.30
Sponsor Northern Network for the Study of the Crusades
Organiser Kathryn Hurlock, Department of History, Politics & Philosophy, Manchester Metropolitan University
Sini Kangas, School of Social Sciences & Humanities, University of Tampere
Jason T. Roche, Department of History, Politics & Philosophy, Manchester Metropolitan University
Moderator/Chair Jason T. Roche, Department of History, Politics & Philosophy, Manchester Metropolitan University
Paper 1508-a The Young and The Old – Feeble Crusaders?: Age in the 12th- and 13th-Century Sources of the Crusades
(Language: English)
Sini Kangas, School of Social Sciences & Humanities, University of Tampere
Index Terms: Crusades; Pagan Religions
Paper 1508-b Women and Children as Victims of the Baltic Crusades: A Case of ‘Ritual Violence’?
(Language: English)
Torben Kjersgaard Nielsen, Institut for Kultur og Globale Studier / Cultural Encounters in Pre-Modern Societies, Aalborg Universitet
Index Terms: Crusades; Pagan Religions
Paper 1508-c The Damascene Frontier, 1099-1128: Frankish / Turkish Conflict and Peacemaking during the Post-First Crusade Era
(Language: English)
Nicholas E. Morton, School of Arts & Humanities, Nottingham Trent University
Index Terms: Crusades; Military History
Abstract In the first of a series of linked sessions on the interrelated themes of crusading, identity, and otherness, Sini Kangas explores the understanding of youth and old age in the 12th- and 13th-century chronicles and chansons of the Crusades, showing how age is employed to shed light on specific contexts, offer additional information, and emphasise small but important details. Tørben Nielsen discusses the Christian expansion in pagan Livonia and Estonia between the years 1184 and 1227 as reported in the Chronicon Livoniae, and seeks to understand why women and children appear repeatedly in the text as the numberless and nameless victims of the crusading warfare. Nic Morton considers the Damascene frontier during the first three decades of the 12th century, and explains why the city’s ruler, Tughtakin, was reluctant to risk a direct confrontation with the newly established Frankish settlers.
Session 1625
Title Apocalyptic Alterity: Otherness and the End Times
Date/Time Thursday 6 July 2017: 11.15-12.45
Organiser Brett E. Whalen, Department of History, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Moderator/Chair Felicitas Schmieder, Historisches Institut, FernUniversität Hagen
Respondent James Palmer, St Andrews Institute of Mediaeval Studies, University of St Andrews
Paper 1625-a Everybody Wants to Rule the World: Crusading Soldiers of Christ at the End of Time
(Language: English)
Matthew Gabriele, Department of Religion & Culture, Virginia Technical Institute
Index Terms: Crusades; Historiography – Medieval; Theology
Paper 1625-b Church, Empire, and Apocalypse in the 13th Century
(Language: English)
Brett E. Whalen, Department of History, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Index Terms: Ecclesiastical History; Historiography – Medieval; Political Thought
Paper 1625-c Heavenly Hermaphrodites: Sexual Difference and the End of Time
(Language: English)
Leah DeVun, Department of History, Rutgers University, New Jersey
Index Terms: Gender Studies; Historiography – Medieval; Sexuality
Abstract Medieval Europe’s apocalyptic imagination provided a compelling field of ideas, texts, and images for Christians to project and contest the norms of their society, framed by the envisioned progress of time from its beginning to its end. This proposed panel will explore some of the ways that apocalyptic and eschatological views of salvation history informed attitudes towards the ‘self’ and ‘others’, past, present, and future, shaping religious, political, and sexual identities. The papers and commentary will also suggest some of the ways that studies of apocalypticism during the Middle Ages have changed over recent years, looking past long-standing debates and issues in the field (e.g. the year 1000, the radical nature of millennialism) to embrace new questions and problems relating to the significance of the apocalypse for medieval intellectual life, society, and spirituality.

 

All Leeds infos here !

CFP – Sanctifying the Crip, Cripping the Sacred – IMCL 2018

Panel title: “Sanctifying the Crip, Cripping the Sacred: Disability, Holiness, and Non-Normative Bodies”

Sponsored by: Hagiography Society

Conference: International Medieval Congress, Leeds (UK), 2-5 July 2018

In her 2006 monograph Disability in Medieval Europe, Irina Metzler conducted the first in-depth analyses of medieval miracle narratives in the context of disability studies. This ground-breaking work demonstrated the ways in which such an approach productively expands – and complicates – out understanding of medieval impairment and medieval hagiography alike. This panel seeks to harness the methodological vigour of Metzler’s intervention, and move the discussion forward to reap the benefits of the efflorescence in medieval disability studies that has taken place since 2006. What can frameworks from disability studies add to studies of medieval holiness, and vice versa? What happens when we sanctify the crip, and crip the sacred?

A vast amount of our knowledge of the experience of impairment in the Middle Ages comes from religious works. An important manifestation of a presumptive saint’s holiness was their capacity to perform mystically curative healings, to return their devotees to an able-bodied state. But medieval saints did not just tend to those with impairment. Some saints were themselves explicitly physically impaired, either permanently or temporarily. Saints’ ascetic self-mortification could also lead to impairment. In all instances, the saint’s body is divergent to the able-bodied norm of those around them, the non-saintly. It operates as a vector of the divine in miraculous healing of others; a receptacle of the divine in their ability to withstand extreme ascetic degradation. What is at stake if we consider the medieval saint’s body as impaired, disabled, emphatically non-able-bodied?

If you’re interested in speaking on this panel, please submit an abstract of roughly 250-300 words, and a brief bio to the panel organiser, Alicia Spencer-Hall (a.spencer-hall [at] ucl.ac.uk), by 1 August 2017. Please also stipulate your audio-visual requirements in your submission (e.g. projector, speakers, and so forth).

N.B. Conference regulations stipulate that speakers may only present on one panel each year at Leeds. As such, we cannot consider papers from individuals who have already submitted abstract proposals to other sessions at the conference.

Link to the organisator’s website

CFP – Religious and/or Medicinal definitions of Otherness – IMC

Religious and/or Medicinal definitions of Otherness,

IMC Leeds 2017

Religion and medicine were in many ways intertwined in the Middle Ages, both in explaining deviance, illness and impairment as well as in the healing practices. They are not anymore seen as competing but rather as supporting, even complementing each other.  Both religion and medicine had their own ways of defining the undesirable, which could lead to the construction of ‘The Other’ – be it disability, mental disorder, or heterodoxy. Some features, like lunacy, leprosy, impotence, or infertility were in the nexus of both religious and medicinal explanations. Both religion and medicine could also offer methods for cure and ways to integrate the deviant persons back into a community. The interconnection of both concepts can be found, for example, in hagiography, sermons, medical treatises and herbals. These sessions aim to analyse healing as cultural practice; the focal questions are how religious and medicinal explanation intermingled in the construction of ‘the Other’ and in what ways they complemented or competed in explaining, categorizing and treating different spiritual, mental and bodily conditions.

We aim at organizing a double session focusing on following questions:

  • Role of medicine and/or religion in constructing the Other
  • Role of medicine and/or religion in experiences of the patient
  • Religion and medicine – rivalling, complementing or symbiotic?
  • Treating the patient, curing the ailment – integration or permanent marginalization?
  • Faith healing and placebo – synonyms, interconnection, anachronisms?

We encourage proposals sensitive to temporal and/or geographical changes focusing on various cultural levels and social contexts. Those interested in presenting a paper in this panel, please submit an abstract of roughly 250-300 words to the organisers by 23 September 2016.

Contacts:
Jenni Kuuliala jenni.kuuliala@uta.fi
Sari Katajala-Peltomaa sari.katajala-peltomaa@uta.fi
Trivium, Tampere Centre for Classical, Medieval, and Early Modern Studies

Call for Papers – ‘For I am a woman, ignorant, weak and frail’: Feminising Death, Disability and Disease in the later Middle Ages – IMC Leeds

‘For I am a woman, ignorant, weak and frail’: Feminising Death, Disability and Disease in the later Middle Ages

International Medieval Congress University of Leeds 3rd – 6th July 2017

Conference Details

The International Medieval Congress is the largest interdisciplinary medieval conference of its kind – attracting over 2,200 attendees from over 50 countries, and boasting approximately 1,700 individual papers within 580 academic sessions. Every year, the IMC chooses a special thematic strand which, for 2017, is ‘Otherness’. This focus has been chosen for its wide application across all centuries and regions and its impact on all disciplines devoted to this epoch. For further information on the Congress, see: http://www.leeds.ac.uk/ims/imc/imc2017_call.html 

Session Details

**Should this session attract enough interest it will become a three-part series, with each session focussing more deeply on the individual themes of death, disability and disease. Within late-medieval society, to be valued was to look and behave according to the societal ‘norm’ – dependency was largely represented as a feminine trait, whereas to be independent was to be masculine. How then did medieval people respond to deviations from these gendered expectations as a result of death (or dying), disabilities and chronic diseases? This session will consider the feminisation of death, disability and disease through an interdisciplinary lens, in order to answer questions about the perceived ‘feminine’ dependency of the marginal ‘third state’ between being fully healthy and fully sick (i.e. to be dying, diseased or disabled). It will hope to consider the contradictory nature of female disease and disability which both engendered an elevated sense of holiness and, conversely, a sense of physical monstrosity; the female response to death, disability and disease as elements of daily life which were (largely) out of their control; the effect of death, disability and disease on medieval constructions of masculinity; and whether – if death, disease and disability dehumanise the body – is it even important to consider the effect of these states on an individual’s gendered identity? We welcome multi-disciplinary papers from all geographical locations, c.1300-c.1500, which engage with themes such as (but not limited to): representations of death, disease and/or (dis)ability; literature either for or by women dealing with the themes of death, disease and/or disability; the tradition of Memento Mori and/or the Danse Macabre; the gendering of ‘Death’ ; the Black Death’s impact on traditional gender roles; obstetric death; female piety and holy anorexia; the effect of chronic disease and/or disability on late-medieval constructions of masculinity; women and disease (as the developers of cures, writers of recipes, carers or patients, etc.); female use of disability aids and/or prosthetics; and self-inflicted disfigurement.

Submission Guidelines

Please send a paper title and an abstract of 100-200 words to Rachael Gillibrand at the Institute for Medieval Studies, University of Leeds (hy11rg@leeds.ac.uk) by 23rd September 2016.

CFP – Leeds 2017 – Leprosy and Power

Leeds IMC 2017 – Leprosy and Power

As next year’s IMC theme of ‘Otherness’ lends itself perfectly to the topic of medieval leprosy, I would like to propose a session on the subject of Leprosy and Power, following on from this year’s successful sessions about Leprosy and Identity. In this session, I would like to explore the various ways in which lepers interacted with medieval authorities – how authorities may have attempted to control the behaviour of lepers in their community, how lepers related to those in power, and how they fitted into a social hierarchy.

Possible topics could include:

· Leprosy and the elite

· Municipal authority and common law

· Canon law and the church

· The power of leprosy in society

· Lepers and social status – before / after diagnosis

Proposals should include a title, abstract (approximately 100 words), and institutional affiliation.

Please submit paper proposals by email to Katie Phillips, University of Reading – k.phillips@pgr.reading.ac.uk – by Friday 9th September.

Via Katie Phillips on Academia

CFP – Leeds 2017 – Pilgrimage: restoring physical, mental and spiritual health

Call for Papers: IMC Leeds 2017

Pilgrimage: Restoring Physical, Mental, and Spiritual Health

Sponsored by the Graduate Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Reading.
The thematic strand for the next International Medieval Congress (3-6 July 2017) at University of Leeds is Otherness. We invite you to submit proposals for 20-minute papers to take part in one or more sessions on the theme of pilgrimage as a restorative process between physical, mental, and spiritual sickness and health. We are particularly interested in papers that address identifications of pilgrims as « others » who were undertaking a unique physical and spiritual journey. Relevant topics include but are not limited to:
• Miraculous healing.

• Penitential pilgrimage.

• Proxy pilgrimage.

• Pilgrimage journeys.

• Experiences of pilgrims at shrines.

• Relics and saintly intercession.

• Monastic and lay interactions with the cult of saints.

If you would like to take part in these sessions, please send an abstract of no more than 200 words as well as a short bio to claire.trenery.2008@live.rhul.ac.uk by Friday 16 September 2016.

Organisers Ruth Salter (University of Reading, ) & Claire Treneryand (Royal Holloway, University of London, )

CFP – Leeds 2017 – Health and Medicine in the Early Medieval West

Call for papers – Health and Medicine in the Early Medieval West – IMC Leeds 2017

We are inviting papers for sessions at IMC Leeds 2017 on Health and Medicine in the Early Medieval West. Despite important new work, early medieval medicine still remains quarantined from the mainstream of early medieval historiography. The aim of these sessions is to diagnose and treat this historiographical “otherness” by bringing health and medicine into conversation with other areas of early medieval historiography, and by using health and medicine as ways of exploring early medieval societies.

Papers on post-Roman, pre-university medicine and/or health from c.500-c.1000 are welcomed on any of the following themes:

a) Situating medical texts and traditions

Possible topics: what counts (and counted) as a medical text/tradition in the early middle ages; continuation of, adaptation of or deviation from medical traditions; manuscript contexts of medical texts; authors and audiences; social, political and/or intellectual contexts of medical learning.

b) Medical ideas outside medical texts

Possible topics: migration of ideas within or outside medical texts; bibliographical evidence (e.g. library catalogues) for medical learning; medical learning and the laity; medical metaphors; health and medicine in pastoral rhetoric; liturgy as medicinal.

c) Moving beyond texts

Possible topics: interdisciplinary approaches to early medieval health; use of aDNA, palaeopathology and bioarchaeology; material culture of health; comparative history.

d) Humans and other animals

Possible topics: animal products in medical practice; health implications of interactions between humans and animals; analogies between human and animal medicine; veterinary medicine.

If interested, please send your details, paper title and an informal abstract to Zubin Mistry (zubin.mistry@ed.ac.uk) and Claire Burridge (cpsb2@cam.ac.uk) by Friday 9th September. Please get in touch if you have any questions and please do pass on the CFP to anyone who may be interested.

CFP – Landscapes/Seascapes – Leeds IMC 2016

Call for papers: Leeds International Medieval Congress 4-7 July 2016

The Medieval Landscape/Seascape

Following on from a successful strand of sessions for the last two years, it has been suggested that we continue in 2016!

Writing about the medieval landscape and environment has a rich and long tradition and is an area in which many of the disciplines that comprise medieval studies have made significant contributions. Scholars working on ideas of the landscape, concepts of space and place as well as in the developing field of environmental humanities have added to our theoretical framework for understanding people’s relationships with the environment in the past. We hope to organise a series of sessions focusing on medieval landscapes/seascapes broadly conceived. We welcome proposals that draw on historical, literary, archaeological, art-historical and musicological approaches and sources.

For 2016, we would like to focus on these themes related to landscapes/seascapes:

  1. Performance: Walking, perambulation, pilgrimage, plays/drama, battle rituals, movement, hunting, magic, rituals;
  2. Memory: Reclamation of empty places, re-use of place, how places in the past are remembered in the present, recording and memory tools,  forgetting/remembering, memorials, post- Black death and spaces/place, connections to past places (e.g. ancient wells, forests);
  3. Journey/Journeys: Itineraries, migrations, pilgrimage, crusades, travel narratives, roads and movement to and thru places, exploration, navigation, map making;
  4. Food & Famine: Production, fishing, preserving, designed spaces (gardens), field usage, empty spaces post plague or famine, images of landscape/seascape in manuscripts, activities related to food.

Potential contributors might like to think about the following ideas/concepts when suggesting a paper in the above themes:

  • the place of the landscape/seascape in historical writing
  • landscape/maritime archaeology
  • medieval urban landscapes
  • the landscape of particular events
  • experiencing the landscape/seascape
  • tools and theories for understanding the medieval landscape/seascape: e.g. digital humanities, knowledge exchange, mapping, etc.
  • different national landscape traditions, including antiquarian and chorographic traditions, and how they affect our understanding of the medieval past.

 

It is hoped that, through these sessions we will raise and begin to answer a number of key questions about landscapes/seascapes in the Middle Ages. What is the relationship between the experience and conceptualisation of landscapes/seascape? What gaps exist in the evidence for the landscape/seascape as a physical, economic, social and cultural phenomenon, and can interdisciplinary work help us to bridge these? What innovative methods and approaches can we bring to the study of medieval landscape/seascape?

Please send abstracts for 20 minute papers to Kimm Curran, University of Glasgow by no later than 15 September 2015. By clicking here and provide the following:

  • Title
  • Abstract (max 200 words)
  • Your name, institution, and role
  • Full postal and electronic contact details (these will be used by Leeds IMC to contact you, post the programme, etc.)

All information on their website !

CFP – Less than two weeks remaining to get your individual paper proposals for IMC Leeds on « Otherness »

The twenty-third International Medieval Congress, Leeds, 3-6 July 2017.

The International Medieval Congress (IMC) is organised and administered by the Institute for Medieval Studies (IMS). Since its start in 1994, the Congress has established itself as an annual event with an attendance of over 2,200 medievalists from all over the world. It is the largest conference of its kind in Europe.

Drawing medievalists from over 50 countries, with over 1,700 individual papers and 580 academic sessions and a wide range of concerts, performances, readings, round tables, excursions, bookfair and associated events, the Leeds International Medieval Congress is Europe’s largest annual gathering in the humanities.

The IMC provides an interdisciplinary forum for the discussion of all aspects of Medieval Studies. Paper and session proposals on any topic related to the Middle Ages are welcome. However, every year, the IMC chooses a special thematic strand which – for 2017 – is ‘Otherness’. This focus has been chosen for its wide application across all centuries and regions and its impact on all disciplines devoted to this epoch.

‘Others’ can be found everywhere: outside one’s own community (from foreigners to non-human monsters) and inside it (for example, religious and social minorities, or individual newcomers in towns, villages, or at court). One could encounter the ‘Others’ while travelling, in writing, reading and thinking about them, by assessing and judging them, by ‘feelings’ ranging from curiosity to contempt, and behaviour towards them which, in turn, can lead to integration or exclusion, friendship or hostility, and support or persecution.

The demarcation of the ‘Self’ from ‘Others’ applies to all areas of life, to concepts of thinking and mentalité as well as to social ‘reality’, social intercourse and transmission of knowledge and opinions. Forms and concepts of the ‘Other’, and attitudes towards ‘Others’, imply and reveal concepts of ‘Self’, self-awareness and identity, whether expressed explicitly or implicitly. There is no ‘Other’ without ‘Self’. A classification as ‘Others’ results from a comparison with oneself and one’s own identity groups. Thus, attitudes towards ‘Others’ oscillate between admiring and detesting, and invite questioning into when the ‘Other’ becomes the ‘Strange’.

The aim of the IMC is to cover the entire spectrum of ‘Otherness’ through multi-disciplinary approaches, on a geographical, ethnic, political, social, legal, intellectual and even personal level, to analyse sources from all genres, areas, and regions.

Possible entities to research for ‘Otherness’ could include (but are not limited to):
• Peoples, kingdoms, languages, towns, villages, migrants, refugees, bishoprics, trades, guilds, or seigneurial systems
• Faiths and religions, religious groups (including deviation from the ‘true’ faith) and religious orders
• Different social classes, minorities, or marginal groups
• The spectrum from ‘Strange’ to ‘Familiar’
• Individuals or ‘strangers’ of any kind, newcomers as well as people exhibiting strange behaviour
• Otherness related to art, music, liturgical practices, or forms of worship
• Any further specific determinations of ‘alterity’

Methodologies and Approaches to ‘Otherness’ (not necessarily distinct, but overlapping) could include:
• Definitions, concepts, and constructions of ‘Otherness’
• Indicators of, criteria and reasons for demarcation
• Relation(s) between ‘Otherness’ and concepts of ‘Self’
• Communication, encounters, and social intercourse with ‘Others’ (in embassies, travels, writings, quarrels, conflicts, and persecution)
• Knowledge, perception, and assessment of the ‘Others’
• Attitudes and behaviour towards ‘Others’
• Deviation from any ‘norms’ of life and thought (from the superficial to the fundamental)
• Gender and transgender perspectives
• Co-existence and segregation
• Methodological problems when inquiring into ‘Otherness’
• The Middle Ages as the ‘Other’ compared with contemporary times (‘Othering’ the Middle Ages).

The Special Thematic Strand ‘Otherness‘ will be co-ordinated by Hans-Werner Goetz (Historisches Seminar, Universität Hamburg).

 

Please find by cliking this link or below all informations:

Session Proposal

Paper Proposal

Round Table Proposal