Archives par mot-clé : Identity

Meetings – Colloquium – ‘Why is my pain perpetual?’ (Jer 15:18): Chronic Pain in the Middle Ages – SSHM – UCL – 29 sept. 2017

 Meetings – Colloquium – ‘Why is my pain perpetual?’ (Jer 15:18): Chronic Pain in the Middle Ages – SSHM – UCL – 29 sept. 2017

Last Booking Date for this Event
1st August 2017
DescriptionPain is a universal human experience. We have all hurt at some point, felt that inescapable sensory challenge to our physical equanimity, our health and well-being compromised. Typically, our agonies are fleeting. For some, however, suffering becomes an artefact of everyday living: our pain becomes ‘chronic’. Chronic pain is persistent, usually lasting for three months or more, does not respond well to analgesia, and does not improve after the usual healing period of any injury.

Following Elaine Scarry’s (1985) seminal work The Body in Pain, researchers from various humanities disciplines have productively studied pain as a physical phenomenon with wide-ranging emotional and socio-cultural effects. Medievalists have also analysed acute pain, elucidating a specifically medieval construction of physical distress. In almost all such scholarship – modern and medieval – chronic pain has been overlooked.

The new field of medieval disability studies has also neglected chronic pain as a primary object of study. Instead, disability scholars in the main focus on ‘visible’ and ‘mainstream’ disabilities, such as blindness, paralysis, and birth defects. Indeed, disability historian Beth Linker argued in 2013 that ‘[m]ore historical attention should be paid to the unhealthy disabled’, including those in chronic pain (‘On the Borderland’, 526). This conference seeks specifically to pay ‘historical attention’ to chronic pain in the medieval era. It brings together researchers from across disciplines working on chronic pain, functioning as a collaborative space for medievalists to enter into much-needed conversations on this highly overlooked area of scholarship.

Relevant topics for this conference include:

Medieval conceptions and theories of chronic pain, as witnessed by scientific, medical, and theological works

Paradigms of chronic pain developed in modern scholarship – and what medievalists can learn from, and contribute to, them.

Comparative analyses of chronic pain in religious versus secular narratives

Recognition or rejection of chronic pain as an affirmative subjective identity

Chronic pain and/as disability

The potential share-ability of pain in medieval narratives, such as texts which show an individual taking on the pain of another

The relationship between affect and the severity, understanding, and experience of pain

The manner in which gender impacts the experience, expression, and management of an individual’s chronic pain

Keynote address:

Prof Esther Cohen (Hebrew University of Jerusalem), one of the foremost scholars on pain in the Middle Ages, will deliver the keynote address: ‘What is Chronic Pain in a Non-Neural Age? Working Definitions, Sources, and Methodologies’.

Confirmed speakers:

-Dr Katherine Harvey (Birkbeck, University of London, UK), ‘Chronic Pain and the Saintly Bishop in Medieval England’
-Dr James McKinstry (Durham University, UK), ‘Headaches, Diseases, and Old Age: William Dunbar’s Diagnosis of Chronic Pain’
-Dr Michele Moatt (National Trust and Lancaster University, UK), ‘Chronic Pain and Prophecy in the Twelfth-century Life of Aelred of Rievaulx
-Catherine Coffey (Queen’s University, Belfast, Northern Ireland), ‘“Mit zwoelf tugenden stritet si wider das vleisch”: The Body Fighting the Flesh in Mechthild von Magdeburg’s Das fließende Licht der Gottheit
-Katherine Briant (Fordham University, New York, USA), ‘Pain as a Theological Framework in Julian of Norwich’s Vision and Revelation
-Dr Nicole Nyffenegger (Bern University, Switzerland), ‘Mary’s Perpetual Physical Pain: Affective Piety and “Doubling”’
-Prof Wendy J Turner (Augusta University, Georgia, USA), ‘Mental Complications of Pain: Age and Violence in Medieval England’
-Dr Bianca Frohne (University of Bremen, Germany), ‘Living With Pain: Constructions of a Corporeal Experience in Early and High Medieval Miracle Accounts’
-Dr William Maclehose (University College London, UK), ‘A Locus for Healing: Saints’ Shrines and Representations of Chronic Pain’

Registration:

-The conference registration fee is £20. The fee is waived completely for concessions (students, the unwaged, retired scholars), though all attendees must register for the conference.
-The registration fee covers refreshments throughout the day for attendees, including tea and coffee at breaks, a sandwich lunch, and a wine reception. If you have any dietary requirements, please list these when you confirm your attendance.
-Registration for the conference will open shortly, and be conducted via the UCL Online Shop, in the ‘Conferences and Events’ category. This page will be updated in due course with a link to the registration page.
Registration closes on 1st August 2017.

More infos on the UCL website

Call for contribution – Same Bodies, Different Women: Witches, Whores, and Handicapped – Trivent Publishing

Call for contribution – Same Bodies, Different Women: Witches, Whores, and Handicapped – Trivent Publishing

Serie : HISTORY AND ARCHEOLOGY

‘Other’ Women in the Middle Ages and the Early Modern Period
Who are the ‘other’ women of the Middle Ages and the Early Modern Period?
This volume seeks to offer a overview on female otherness concentrating on the variety of contexts in which ‘other’ women emerge:
How is their ‘otherness’ constructed?
Who are the forgotten women of the Middle Ages?
How are they perceived?
What makes them ‘other?

 

The literature on women in the Middle Ages or the Early Modern Period has the tendency to mostly emphasize models (be that
saints, queens, or women in positions of power)
and the brighter side of femininity.
This scholarship is occasionally supplemented by individual case studies of ‘other’ women, such as prostitutes, which are usually used to reinforce notions of ‘ideal’ feminine behaviour.
Nevertheless, a volume which encompasses all forms of deviance from the norm seems necessary to counterbalance and to supplement this vast literature on medieval women.
Applying a multi-disciplinary approach to these marginalized women should aid not only in uncovering a more complete picture of medieval women, but also to better understand their own agency and potential for action.

 

This volume welcomes individually – submitted papers, but will also gather the papers from the workshop entitled
“Forgotten Women from a Forgotten Region: Prostitutes and Female Slaves in Central and Eastern Europe in the Long Middle Ages” to be held at Central European University, Budapest, in May, 2017

 

They welcome papers for the volume to be titled Same Bodies, Different Women: Witches, Whores, and Handicapped. ‘Other’ Women in the Middle Ages and the Early Modern Period Aiming to reflect recent research on the construction(s) of female otherness, we call for original manuscripts focusing on (but not limited to) the following transdisciplinary topics related to women :
  • Art: visual and textual sources (the whore of Babylon/the Apocalypse, courtesans, etc)
  • Religion: impure, lapsed, possessed women, heretics
  • Medicine: disabled, mentally insane or ill women , hermaphrodites ; abortions/bodily dysfunctions/malformations
  • Society: witches, beggars, foreigners, enslaved women
  • Sexuality: prostitutes, sexually deviant women

 

Submission Guidelines
Papers should be written following the humanities template and guidelines found at www.trivent-publishing.eu and should have between minimum 7 and maximum 20 pages
We expect submissions by no later than September 2017.

 

The volume will be published open access. It will be listed in
CEEOL, Directory of Open Access Scholarly Resources, SSOAR, DOI, and will be sent for evaluation in the Book Citation Index of Thomson Reuters.

 

For information and queries on the scientific content of the volume, please contact the editors of the volume,
Andrea-Bianka Znorovszky,
American University of Central Asia,
znorovszky_a@auca.kg
Christopher Mielke, Central European University,
Mielke_Christopher@phd.ceu.edu
For information on the publication, please contact teodora.artimon@trivent-publishing.eu
or see Trivent Publishing’s website here:
www.trivent -publishing.eu

 

FInd the call for contribution on the editor’s website.

 

 

CFP – Lived religion and everyday life through earlymodern catholic hagiography – Finland Institute in Rome

Lived religion and everyday life through earlymodern catholic hagiography – Finland Institute in Rome

Final submission of articles: Autumn 2013

Studies on medieval social and cultural history have already for several decades demonstrated the rich possibilities hagiographic material can offer the historian interested in everyday life, lived religion and society. Since the late fifteenth century, this material has experienced an unprecedented growth in volume. Nevertheless. there is still a great need for studies on lived religion and everyday life portrayed through early modem catholic hagiographic material.

To address this need. we invite abstracts for contributions on the subject from scholars worthy with early modem (ca. 15km » centuries) hagiographic material. such as beatification and canonisation processes. other miracle accounts. art, vitae. and other spiritual (autobiographies. The aim is to produce a high-quality collection of articles, which offers cutting-edge and fruitful insights into early modern social and cultural history, using hagiographic texts and art as sources. We especially welcome communications, which have a sensitive approach to gender, age, health and social status.

The deadline for submitting abstracts is the end of February 2017. Twelve most promising abstracts will be selected. it funding cm be secured, the article drafts will be discussed it May 2018 in a workshop organised at the Finnish Institute in Rome (Vita Lante). The collection of articles will be submitted to an international publisher following the peer-review process soon after the meeting, in autumn 2018.

Suitable article topics for the collection will include. but are not limited to:

  • family and household, gender roles
  • health, body, dis/ability, illness, and cure
  • death and salvation
  • religious practices and materiality of religion
  • identity and community

    Please send an abstract of no more than 300 words for an English article and a short biography including name, affiliation and the most important publications, to earlymodernhagiography@gmail.com by Tuesday February 28th. 2017.

Editors and contact informations:
Jenni Kuuliala
PhD. Postdoctoral Researcher (Academy of Finland)
University of Tampere

CFP – ‘“Why is my pain perpetual?” (Jer 15:18): Chronic Pain in the Middle Ages’ – London – 29 september 2017

Conference: ‘“Why is my pain perpetual?” (Jer 15:18): Chronic Pain in the Middle Ages’
Location: Institute of Advanced Studies, University College London, London, UK
Date: Friday, 29 September 2017

Extended deadline : Wednesday, 1 March 2017

Pain is a universal human experience. We have all hurt at some point, felt that inescapable sensory challenge to our physical equanimity, our health and well-being compromised. Typically, our agonies are fleeting. For some, however, suffering becomes an artefact of everyday living: our pain becomes ‘chronic’. Chronic pain is persistent, usually lasting for three months or more, does not respond well to analgesia, and does not improve after the usual healing period of any injury.
Following Elaine Scarry’s (1985) seminal work The Body in Pain, researchers from various humanities disciplines have productively studied pain as a physical phenomenon with wide-ranging emotional and socio-cultural effects. Medievalists have also analysed acute pain, elucidating a specifically medieval construction of physical distress. In almost all such scholarship – modern and medieval – chronic pain has been overlooked.
The new field of medieval disability studies has also neglected chronic pain as a primary object of study. Instead, disability scholars in the main focus on ‘visible’ and ‘mainstream’ disabilities, such as blindness, paralysis, and birth defects. Indeed, disability historian Beth Linker argued in 2013 that ‘[m]ore historical attention should be paid to the unhealthy disabled’, including those in chronic pain (‘On the Borderland’, 526). This conference seeks specifically to pay ‘historical attention’ to chronic pain in the medieval era. It will bring together researchers from across disciplines working on chronic pain, functioning as a collaborative space for medievalists to enter into much-needed conversations on this highly overlooked area of scholarship.

Prof Esther Cohen (Hebrew University of Jerusalem), one of the foremost scholars on pain in the Middle Ages, will deliver the keynote address at the conference.

Relevant topics for this conference include:
· Medieval conceptions and theories of chronic pain, as witnessed by scientific, medical, and theological works
· Paradigms of chronic pain developed in modern scholarship – and what medievalists can learn from, and contribute to, them
· Comparative analyses of chronic pain in religious versus secular narratives
· Recognition or rejection of chronic pain as an affirmative subjective identity
· Chronic pain and/as disability
· The potential share-ability of pain in medieval narratives, such as texts which show an individual taking on the pain of another
· The relationship between affect and the severity, understanding, and experience of pain
· The manner in which gender impacts the experience, expression, and management of an individual’s chronic pain

If you’re interested in speaking at the conference, please submit an abstract of 250-300 words and a brief bio to the organiser, Alicia Spencer-Hall (a.spencer-hall [at] qmul.ac.uk), by 15 January 2017. Please also stipulate your audio-visual requirements in your submission (e.g. projector, speakers, and so forth).

NB Speakers will need to register for the conference in due course. The registration fee is £20. The fee is waived completely for concessions (students, the unwaged, retired scholars).

If you have any queries, including access requirements, please do not hesitate to contact the organiser.

This conference contributes to the ‘Sense and Sensation’ research strand at UCL’s Institute of Advanced Studies. This strand also comprises a Reading Group focused on chronic pain. To join the Reading Group, please email the organiser, Alicia Spencer-Hall.

More info on Alicia’s blog